100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 14, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-04-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

, 14, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PA

THE_.. _MICHIGAN DATTIY__

BULL SSSION
by b. s. brown, sports editor

Wings Drop Third Straight, 3-1

J. Paul Sheedy* Switched to Wildroot Cream-Oil
Because Ile Flunked The Finger-Nail Test

a-

BASEBAWL S HARRY HOUDINI, the inimitable Casey Stengel,
will have to pull more than a sparrow from his hat if he hopes
to pilot the Yankees into the first division this year.
Casey's biggest headache is Joe DiMaggio's ailing heel. The
$100,000 slugger probably will be released from the hospital today
but there was no indication that he would be ready for action early
in the season, or at any time during the campaign, for that matter.
If Joe doesn't come through and is forced to the inactive
list, Stengel will have to rely on either Hank Bauer, who has seen
limited service with the Yanks but isn't ready to step into
DiMag's shoes, or Gene Woodling, one of the newer additions to
the squad. Winning a pennant entails gambles here and there,
but Casey is trying for a good showing (after comparatively lean
years in the managerial ranks) and gambling on a newcomer
in place of one of the greatest sluggers of all time is a little
too much to expect.
Then there's the problem of Charley Keller. A series of injuries,
especially the one to his back, almost brought down the curtain on
his playing career. King Kong insists he is in ship-shape condition,
but he has yet to begin thumping the sphere with any authority.
There's always Big John Lindell to replace the Maryland Mauler,
but Casey has been toying with re-converting handsome Johnny to a
pitcher-because of his fine knuckle ball.
And what to do with Snuffy Stirnweiss? Joe Gordon is about
the only second sacker around who can out-shine the pudgy Stirn-
weiss afield. But at the bat, Snuffy leaves much to be desired. Casey
could always play Bobby Brown, the golden-haired medic, at second
but he'll never be the fielder Stirnweiss has proved himself to be.
First base is another problem. Stengel could use Ole Reliable
Tommy Henrich on the first sack, but that leaves a vacancy
out in right-one that might be a little difficult to fill with either
Woodling or Bauer in center, Lindell in left and Berra behind
the bat. Rookie Dick Kryhoski, a Leonia, N.J., product, has
been coming along, but from all reports, he still isn't ready for
full time action at the initial bag.
And it sems almost a certainty that Yogi Berra will be confining
his activities to receiving come opening day at the Stadium. With
the' old master, Bill Dickey, coaching the backstop, it seems a good
bet to predict that Yogi's days as an outfielder are over.
So give the Yanks a good third baseman-Billy Johnson-and
a pretty fair crop of pitchers, and what do you have? The need for
Mgr. Casey Stengel to brush up on his Houdini handbook and start
pulling some players out of that well-worn cap of his.

Lone Detrolt
Score Made
By Stew art
TORONTO -(')-The Toronto
Maple Leafs moved within a game
of becoming the first team in
modern professional hockey to win
the Stanley Cup three successive
times last night as they downed
Detroit Red Wings 3-1 last night.
it was their third straight victory
without defeat in the best of seven
final National Hockey League se-
ries.
Once the Leafs moved on even
terms, there wasno doubt of the
outcome as the Detroit team
flapped along on one wing. In the
final 20 minutes, although they
were two goals down, the Wings
directed only four shots at Turk
Broda, Toronto's steady goaltend-
er.
BLACK JACK Stewart put D-
troit in front early in the first
period when he fired a long shot
into the open corner of the Tor-
onto net after Pete k{oreck passed
out from the corner. For 31 min-
utes the Wings held the lead and
seemed to be headed for their first
victory of the series when Toronto
put on a burst of power that could
not be denied.
At one time in the second pe-
riod, the Leafs played two men
short for 20 seconds. Just as
Bill Ezinicki returned to bring
the teams to full strength he
caught up with an attack to tie
the score.
But on Toronto's other two
goals, Lumley didn't look so good.
Ted Kennedy squeezed a back-
hander between his pads and the
post for what proved to be the de-
ciding tally, Gus Mortson's shot
for the final goal skimmed under
Lumley's stick.
AFTER BEING outshot 11-8 in
the first period, the Leafs pelted
the puck at Lumley with regular-
ity. In the final stanza they tested
him 13 times and outshot the
Wings for the night, 34-23.
The teams meet here in the
fourth game Saturday night.
Group Studies
MSC Request
CHICAGO - (/P)--A three-man
committee from the Western Con-
ferencewasgscheduled to depart
from Chicago yesterday for a
three day study of Michigan State
College in connection with its pro-
posed admission to the "Big Ten."
Conference faculty representa-
tives voted unanimously last De-
cember to admit Michigan State,
contingent on a survey by the
special committee.
Kenneth Little of Wisconsin is
chairman of the committee, which
also includes Paul J. Bloomers of
Iowa and Conference Commission-
er Kenneth L. (Tug) Wilson.
The group will study Michigan
State's scholarship program, its
football training table policies and
school procedure in connection
with campus jobs for athletes.
If Michigan State's athletic pro-
gram conforms to the Conference
code it is presumed the committee
will recommend formal approval
of Conference membership, pos-
sibly at the spring meeting in
Evanston, Ill.

Daiy-Tyson
CAPTAIN SHOWS WAY-Varsity golf captain, Ed Schalon,
pictured above took a three stroke lead in the first round of the
current spring qualifying tourney by firing a sub-par 71 on the
University course yesterday.
EXC USE US PLEASE:
C iferenee Holds Drills
s West Coast Laments

Paton Tops
In Western
Court Ranks
Wolverine net prospects got a
double shot in the arm over vaca-
tion with Andy Paton's win of
the Western Indoor Championship
and Bill Mikulich being declared
eligible for another court season.
Top netter for Michigan and
singles champ of the Big Nine,
Paton teamed up with Tony Tra-
bert of Cincinnati to sweep the
doubles matches after notching
his singles win.
Paton was in top form in Chi-
cago, winning in the semi's from
Trabert, three sets out of four.
Trabert last year was National
Indoor Junior Champ and is now
rated the best tennis prospect in
the country.
In the finals, Paton met North-
western's Grant Golden, downing
him in three straight sets, 6-4, 6-4,
7-5. Golden is spotted to play'
number one singles for the Wild-
cats.
After the singles matches, Paton
and Trabert teamed up against
Lennis Brose of Michigan State
and Jack Sunderland of Kalama-
zoo College to win 6-2, 6-2, 6-2.
Although the net squad failed
to make a spring tour, they have
beeii practicing on the Varsity
courts since their return from va-
cation. Mikulich is a welcome ad-
dition to the squad and strength-
ens an already strong team. "Mik"
is a three-year letterman and was
captain of the Maize and Blue
last year when he played in the
number two berth.
The net squad boasts a solid
punch for any Big Nine contend-
er. Paton tops the list and al-
though "Mik" is still to be rated,
lie will probably be number two
along with Al Hetzeck and Pred
Otto. Naugle and Mackay are vet-
eran netters and will probably fill
out the squad although Don Lin-
coln, a newcomer to "M" net
ranks, is a close contender.
Regular practice is scheduled
until the first meet of the season
at East Lansing against the Spar-
tans, April 28, although an ex-
hibition match possibly may be
held according to Coach Murphy.
VET'S
WATCH REPAIR
Earliest deadline in the state
of Michigan
12:30
BE ON TIME!
Blue Front-Packard and State
West Lodge PX-Willow Lodge
YOUR EASTER
HAIR STYLE-
is blended, and shaped to your
Personality in a popular Short
or Long Cut to please you.
9 Tonsorial Artists
No Waiting
DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty off State

r.

s

FRESH FISH

For the finest in
SEA FOOD
during
every season

Liberty Fish & Chips
RESTA URANT
301 EAST LIBERTY STREET
Hours: 11 A.M.-12 P.M. 'til 1 A.M. Fri. & Sat.

By PRFS HOLMES
Regular spring football drills
are under way at every school in
the Big Nine, much to the discom-
fort of the West Coast-the scribes
in particular.
Last year the western sports
writers claimed that the reason
why the Western Conference foot-
ball teams so consistently beat the
home town squads was because of
the six weeks of spring practice
taken by the Big Nine gridders.
ONE LOS ANGELES expert, last
season, after Ohio State had beat-
en Southern California, 20-0, in
the Trojans' third game of the
season, explained the defeat by
stating that the Pacific Coast Con-
ference teams had had only a
month of spring drills.
In the same breath he write
off the 49-0 drubbing Michigan
had handed the Trojans in the
Rose Bowl the first day of the
year. The way he made it sound
the Wolverines won the game
because of two extra weeks of
practice they had had seven
months before the game was
played.
Big Nine teams play six games
against squads from the Pacific
Coast Conference this coming fall.
The sports writers have the same
loophole since all the Western
Conference teams are going strong
in the usual month-and-a-half
long spring drill.
* *. *
THEY HAVE especial cause to
moan when they look at Iowa. The
Hawkeyes are the only Big Nine
team to play the West Coast twice,
meeting U.CL.A. and Oregon, and
Iowa has been practicing since

March 7 with intentions of going
on into the middle of May.
Minnesota, although they
play only Washington, will un-
doubtedly receive some West
Coast onions. Coach Bernie Bier-
man held winter practice ses-
sions this year in addition to
the spring drill now in progress.
The other intersectional games
are Michigan at Stanford, Ohio
State at Southern California, and
California at Wisconsin.
THE WAY it works out, figuring
only the days drills are held, rath-
er than the length of time in
weeks, eight of the Big Nine teams
practice on the average of 34 days.
Iowa is scheduled to drill for 45
days.
This doesn't seem like such a
terrific advantage. In fact the
West Coast writer's whole case
can be made useless by the fact
that Michigan beat Oregon,
14-0, last fall.
Although at first this example
may tend to back up the claim, in
reality it seems to do just the op-
posite. Oregon, a full-fledged
member of the Pacific Coast Con-
ference, had practiced football all
summer long as a part of what
they termed some sort of a physi-
cal education program. This, of
course, in addition to the spring
practice.
The Los Angeles scribe didn't
attempt to explain this circum-
stance. Maybe the West Coast
writers had better hunt for an-
other "here's why we lost."

POOR old Sheedy had a hang dog look before he tried the
Finger-Nail Test and switched to Wildroot Cream-Oil.
Today-he's a blue ribbon winner. Regular use of Wildroot
Cream-Oil now gives him a snappy, well-groomed look. No
longer is he bothered by dryness and loose, ugly dandruff.
He's out of the dog house for good with his girl friends. Why
not dog trot down to your nearest drug store for a bottle or
tube of non-alcoholic Wildroot Cream-Oil right now! And ask
your barber for professional applications. You'll find that once
you start using Wildroot Cream-Oil containing Lanolin, you're o~ ua
a gay dog in even the best society.
* of 327 Burroughs Dr., Snyder, N. Y. . swnto !
Wildroot Company, Inc., Buffalo 11, N. Y.
/Tw~o things ever r
E
ik
a This is a Fraternity Brother.
Always happy to paddle other p('ople's
N canoes. Spends days in haze. College
is mostly Greek to him. Rushes . ..
or a 4Man44aan" Fraternity S h
I'M
1
y~
^ : This is a "Manhauan" Fraternity
Sportshirt. Properly initiate. with
authentic fraternity insignia and pins.
Also gets straight "A's" for smart
tailoring and easyfit.
In washable cotton-rayon mixture.
Choice of exclusive Manhttan" colors.
CAMP US F A V O R ITE
THE MANHATTAN SHIRT COMPANY
InCwasha1949,otton-raon mixtre .
Ch fcla c
7X

Superlative Sound From
LONDON RECORDS
Hear Your Machine At Its Best.
London Records Reproduce The
Full Hearing Range.
"
BRITTEN: Folk Ballads-La 30
Peter Pears and Britten.............. $3.99
SUPPE: Famous Overtures-La 24

g-

BUSINESS OR PLEASURE

COMING SOON!

Ann
TH
ANI

National Symphony of England. . .

. ... $7.35

Arbor's 4Sporfs
IRD Sh
NUAL April,
TWO
DA"

ow
23-24
,BIG
YS!

KETELBY: In a Monastery Garden, etc.-La 22

0.*
^ 'Nt1 G
j.IG"f . " }t1.
}}r :: t
C
S t
t

:0 : O
.,........ t ':.

New Promenade Orchestra.......
Songs of Old Vienna-La 11
Erna Sack....................
COATES: Four Centuries Suite-La 35
National Symphony with Coates ....

....$3.99

YOU'RE~
WITH
7 '-LEY

.$7.35

.... $5.25

Songs of Old Vienna-La 25
Max Lichtegg...... ............ .

.$7.35

BIGGER.
BETTER!
HUGER!
GREATER!
Ptno o
to see
tis shore

We are constantly watching for outstanding recordings
by progressive Independents, and believe that you will
find much to attract your interest where music on
records is a pleasure as well as a business.

r

I

Ask
i 1S c
G
t
r

&N
¢ t -. n :.+.. r. " ,. 'tx?..
Fraternity men. You'll get a bang
out of our complete line of
-- shirts, neckwear,
pajamas, sportshirts, handkerchiefs,
underwear and beachwear.

$3 45
Essley "Blount" Shirt
Whatever the occasion, you're well-dressed with Essley White.
Take a look at Essley "Blount," for example. It's one of the slickest,
brighest whites you've ever laid eyes on! Terrific tailoring! Sanforized
broadcloth so smooth it's a treat to touch! And the exclusive

I

I

:'?

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan