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April 12, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-04-12

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~R~ 12 19S~THE MICHIGAN DAILYS °

PAGE TH

Baseball

T our

ets

Five

..
Aff lk WWS Aff IL
AOL-JM
. , AOL 4--%A L o squ

Twice

Moundsme n Overcome
Lack of Fielding, l itting

n. tam -- ..-..

"We've received good pitching
3o far, but we'll need better field-
irg and hitting support." So spoke
VMichigan baseball coach Ray
Risher in summarizing the vaca-
tion southern trip which saw the
team win five starts, lose a pair
and gain a disputed tie with Vir-,
ginia.
The Maize and Blue victories
were over Maryland (4-0), Quan-
tico Marines (4-2), Richmond
(15-3), Navy (5-4) and VMI (18-
4), while the losses were inflicted
by George Washington (5-4) and
Washington and Lee (6-3).
SOUTHPAW DICK SMITH was
the only two-game winner, throw-
ing a three-hitter against Mary-
land and giving up four safeties
to the Navy outfit.
The other victories were
pitched by Bill Taft, who also
hurdled the d(eadlock against
Weatherman
k' Outdoor
Track Work
Michigan trackmen took ad-
vantage of a warm sun and dry
track as they indulged in their
first official outdoor practice yes-
terday afternoon.
The Wolverine thinclads had
been running outdoors whenever
weather permitted since tho end
of the indoor season, but this was
the first time that Coach Don
Canham has had all of his
charges outdoors simultaneously.
THE LONG LIST of injuries
which plagued the cinder squad
throughout the indoor season has
been cut down to one name-Herb
Barten.
The blonde Olympic middle
distance star who has been
bothered by a bad foot all sea-
son is still a question mark in
the Wolverine track picture.
Most of the varsity trackmen
remained in Ann Arbor to work
out during the spring recess while
several others came from nearby
homes to join in the drills.
First outdoor meet for the Wol-
verines will be held April 27
against the University of Cali-
fornia. The Bears, boasting terrific
depth in the dashes and middle
distances, will be here for the only
twilight meet of the season.

Virginia, a 10-inning affair, Bud
Rankin and Bob Hicks.
Dave 'Settle pitched for eight
innings against George Washing-
ton, but was'relieved when Pete
Palmer batted for him in the
ninth frame, an inning in which
the Maize and Blue scored two
runs to gain a 4-3 edge.
* * *
BUT PAT MORRISON, pitching
for the Wolverines in the last half
of the ninth, walked the first two
men to face him and then un-
corked a wild pitch.
Coach Fisher quicikly put in
Rankin, who had thrown a four-
hitter the previous day against
Richmond, and the southpaw
put out the firg with only one
marker crossing the plate. In
the tenth, however, the General
third baseman singled with two
out to drive home the winning
run from second.
Rankin started the contest with
Washington and Lee, and was fol-
lowed on the mound by Settle and
Morrison in that order.
THE SOUTHERNERS combed
the offerings of the Wolverine
moundesmen for 11 safeties, in-
oluding a double and triple, and
the Maize and Blue pitchers were
also the victim.h of some very
sloppy fielding as their mates
made seven miscues.
In the Virginia contest, a dis-
puted run by the Cavaliers in
the eighth inning forced the vis-
itors to settle for a 1-1 deadlock.
For seven frames Taft and
Buddy Charles, the Virginia hurler
locked horns in a scoreless game.
AFTER CHARLES had held the
Maize and Blue in the top of the
eighth, righthander Tom Phillips
walked and was sacrificed to sec-
ond.
Leftfielder Dave Carr beat out
a slow roller to shortstop and,
after Taft got by the next batter,
Pitcher Charles walked up to
the plate.
Three times he tired to bunt
and three times he missed the ball.
But, after missing the third time,
blocked Wolverine receiver Hal
Raymond from tagging Phillips,
who was racing in from third.
Umpire Bill Mylam, apparently,
unsure of his ground, sent the
runner back to third from where
he came home when Ted Kobrin
messed up Bill Berner's grounder.
Detroit (A) 2, Memphis (SA) 2
(Called at end of 13th, dark-
ness.)

Lazenineyer Optimistic
Despite Southern Defeats
Although Michigan golfers THE SQUAD'S average for
dropped two matches and tied the practice and competition rounds
other on their southern tour, combined was a neat 75.7 strokes
Coach Bert Katzenmeyer was a per round per manewle in (om-
victure of optimnstic sun-tan eon- petition only the Wolverine ;olf-
< <in trtam's chances this ptinol h oeiegl-
en.tee c s ers cut that down to a scant 74.4
eAdd that Ihe Authern c - average per man.
Add lcours-
:s were quite unfamiliar to the Katzenmeyer comwented that
Wolvehrie visitors and that the he expects this year's team to

of
a
E

Sports Notes
There wvill be an 3V Club
mneeting at ;7:30 this evening in
the Field llouse.
Tennis courts at Palmer and
Ferry Fields will be opened to
students today.
As was the case last spring
there will be a fee of 25 cents
per hour per player. Season
passes may be purchased for
* '* '
All candidates for freshman
baseball should report to Ferry
Field today and bring their
own equipment.
+ M *
All second semecter fresh-
men and 1st semester sopho-
mores who would like to try-
out for Soph. Football man-
ager, see Howard Cooper at
Ferry Field between 3 and 5
p.m. today.

2eginning tomorrow after-
noon there will be 72 holes of
medal play to qualify all golf-
s s for freshman, jayvee and
arsit y positions on the golf
team.a
-Bert Katzenmeyer

be a strong, well balanced team
capable of making a healthy
bid for the conference title.
Ed. Schalon, Rog Kessler, Pete
Elliott, Leo Hauser, Bob Olsen and
Chuck MacCallum, all of whom
did well on the trip, will be the
men to beat for varsity positions.
Plenty of practice is on the
schedule until the Wolverines
open their season with the Uni-
versity of Detroit here April 20.

I I

Dixie teams have
practicing for most
and the record isn'tI

been outside
of the winter,
too bad at all.

Daly -
IHONORED FEW--The eleven who received Fielding HI. Yost Awards from Mrs. Yost are pi tured
with her. They are from left to right, Top Row: Tom Peterson, Boyd McCaslin, Dan Dworsky, lim
Atchison, Bill Upthegrove, Pete Elliott, Ed Ulvestad. Bottom Row: Dick Fashbaugh, Ed McNeill,
Mrs. Yost, Dick Starrak, and Bob Sohl. The presentations were made at the annual Yost Banquet,
Eleven Reeive YOst ono Awards

3
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I
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NORTH CAROLINA was the
roughest as they pounded out a
18-9 win over the Wolverines.
The other two were closer.
Duke edged the Wolverines
I -12 "'i a nice match, then
1e VI olverines squeezed Wake
lst with a 13,,2-131 tie
ma h.
A glance at the team's average
shows the brand of golf the team
shot even while being whipped.

r

- - - ---- - -- -----

l

1'

ITI

-.

Eleven Michigan athletes were
named as the 1948-49 recipients
of the Fielding Yost Honor Awards
last night at a banquet held in the
Michigan Union.
The award winners are: James
L. Atchison; Dan L. Dworsky;
Peter R. Elliott; Richard H. Fash-
baugh; Boyd L. McCaslin: Edward
D. McNeill: Thomas R. Peterson;
Robert Sohl; Richard Starrak;

Edward A. Uulestad; and William'
R. Upthegrove.
OF THE 45 candidates for the
awards, only three had scholastic
averages of less than 2.5 while 161
had a 3.0 or better.
The average scholarship of
the 11 winners is 3.16 and the
lowest mark achieved by any of
the recipients is 2.8.

iuclaian Wins as Gymnasts
Finish Fifth in Midwest Open

Announcement of the various
grade averages was obviously di-
rected at the criticism which has
been levelled at extra-curricular
activities to the effect that medio-
cre scholarship records are a di-
rect result of those activities
which are time-consuming and are
of meaningful chlarac i r.
THE AWARDS were based on
four standards, namely: moral
character and good citizenship;
scholastic ability and interrectual
capacity and achievement; physi-
cal ability and vigor; and capacity
and promise of leadership and suc-
cess.
Peterson, who was first string
fullback on Michigan's National
Championship football squad last
year, Ulvestad, pole vault expert
for the Wolverine thinclads, and
Upthegrove, whose activities arc
confined to swimming the breast-
stroke for Matt Mann's natators, i
are juniors. The other eight men'
are graduating seniors.

A. J. Sturzenegger, 64, a for-
mer Michigan grid coach, died
over the week-end in Los An-
geles, where he has been con-
nected with the UCLA athletic
department. "Sturzy" was
backfield coach under Fielding
it. Yost until 1924.

I

Michigan's Ed. Buchanan came
through again with flying colors
as he placed first on the tramp-
poline in the Midwestern Open
Gymnastics Meet held April 2 at
the Navy Pier in Chicago.
In team scoring, Coach Newt
Loken's men finished fifth with
19 points. Leading the field was
the host team, Navy Pier (Branch
of University of Illinois) with 40% 1
points, followed by Michigan
State, Minnesota, Kent State of
Ohio, Michigan, Iowa and Chi-
cago.
ALTHOUGH Buchanan paced
the field of entries in the tram-
poline event, he was the only
Wolverine to take a first place.
Entering in two events, Pete Bar-
thell garnered second place be-
hind Irvin Bedard of Navy Pier
in the tumbling contest and set-
tled for fourth in parallel bars.
Bettiti"y Baii
LANSING, Mich. - (P) - The
Michigan Senate voted 24 to 2 last
night to outlaw pari-mutuel bet-
ting on horse racing.
A bill, sponsored by 21 Repub-
lican senators, went through the
Senate after brief debate and pro-
ceeded to the House where its fate
is uncertain.

SENIORS
The Officdal Universit
of Michigan Ring
PLAIN SIGNET AND STONE SET STYLES
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
Fraternity and sorority coat of arms or Greek letters
encrusted by special order only. Your initials and last
name beautifully engraved with our compliments.
Try one on in your size today. There is no obligation,
and a very small deposit will reserve yours until you
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Wolverine Tom Tillman cop-
ped fifth place honors in tum-
bling, while sixth spot was held
down by Captain Dick Fash-
baugh in all-around scoring and
Bob Schoendube in the tram-
poline event.
Michigan State's Mel Stout took
two firsts as he placed in six of
seven events and accounted forl
all but two of the Spartan's 28
points.
'M'Rifle Club
Cops Honors
Competing without varsity sta-
tus, the Michigan Rifle Club is
upholding the Wolverine winning
tradition on the target ranges.
In the Third Annual Motor City
Rifle Tournament, sponsored by
the Ford Gun Club of Dearborn,
three men representing the club
walked off with several top hon-
ors.
Pacing the winners was William
Powell, who copped the aggregate
in the sharpshooter class, the high
sharpshooter titles in the prone,
kneeling and standing positions,
prone sitting and standing posi-
tions, and in the 30'-shot standing
competition.

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