100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 31, 1949 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCIII

"ll

WHE MICHIGAN STORY:
Schools of Applied Sciences,. Arts

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 1)
tory through the gift of the "Sag-
inaw Forest" on Liberty St.
DURING THE next two decades
the newly - formed department
grew steadily in numbers, influ-
ence and prestige. Prof. Roth
proved to be an inspiring force
until his resignation in 1912 to
accept a post at Cornell.
But joy followed gloom as he
decided to remain here after all;
Prof. Roth retired from teach-
ing in 1923 amid well-earned
eulogies.
Three years later after much
deliberation, the Regents decided
to expand and strengthen the
work in forestry through the es-
tablishment of an independent
unit-the School of Forestry and
Conservation.
* * *
THE REGENTS provided that
the school should handle "instruc-
tion, research and cooperation
with other institutions and groups
relating to the protection, produc-
tion, management, utilization and
influence of forests and their re-
sources," including trees and oth-
er forms of wild life.
Engineering..,
The Act of 1837 founding the
University provided for courses in
engineering, but it was not until
1853 that engineering was offered,
under the title of Engineering and
Architecture. Alexander Winchell,
the first professor, taught civil
engineering and courses in archi-
tecture.
However, Prof. Winchell, for
whom Winchell House in the
West Quadrangle is named, was
a geologist. and a zoologist at
heart. The first professor of
engineering for engineering's
sake was DeVolson Wood, ap-
pointed by President Tappan in
1857.
The first two engineering stu-
dents were graduated in 1860.
Ten years later the number was
15, but in 1872 Wood proposed to
the Regents a separate college
to teach civil engineering and
"unique courses" in a machine
tools laboratory and technical
physics and chemistry.
RARE OPPORTUNITY!
STUDY ... TRAVEL
it SPAIN
CASTILIAN GROUP, ANDALUSIAN
GROUP, BASQUE-CATALAN GROUP
65 Days ... $975.00
DEPARTURES JUNE 29 TO JULY 2
Sponsored by:
UNIVERSITY of MADRID
For Descriptive Folder Write:
SPANISH STUDENT TOURS
500 Fifth Ave., N.Y. 18, N.Y.

CHARLES E. Green took over
after Wood's death in 1872.
The year 1881 marked the ad-
vent of the college's first sep-
arate building, a tiny $1500
shop with $1000 worth of equip-
ment.
Green's big accomplishment in
building was the first large struc-
ture of the college, a brick shop
built in 1886 with a fancy clock
tower, the West Engineering An-
nex.
ONE OF TIlE professors' homes
was taken over in 1891 for general
classes but was razed in 1923 to
make way for the Clements Li-
brary.
The West Engineering Build-
ing, which has the unique fea-
ture of being undercut by an
arch, was Green's last major
program in 1902.
Mortimer E. Cooley became
dean after Green's death in 1904,
and his 24-year term was marked
by the College's growing pains in
which there was a series of abrupt
changes in attendance due to
cycles of business prosperity. Since
that time the attendance has
steadily climbed to its present en-
rollment of nearly 4,000.
AN OLD red brick school build-
ing near the campus was con-
demned in 1922 as unsafe and
obsolete by educational officials
in Ann Arbor, but was sold to
anxious engineering officials who
were pressed for space, and re-
named East Hall.
After Dean Cooley's retirement
in 1928, Herbert C. Sadler became
dean. H. C. Anderson was dean
from 1937 to 1940, when the Col-
lege of Engineering's fifth and
present head, Dean Crawford,
came into office.
Architecture...
The teaching of architecture
and allied arts was provided for
when the University was estab-
lished in 1837, but did not actual-
ly begin until forty years had
passed. ®In 1878, Irving K. Pond,
who was later to design the Union
and the League, was its sole stu-
dent,
BUT ARCHITECTURAL stud-
ies were discontinued the next
year; Pond took his degree in en-
gineering.
And it was in the engineering
college that a department of ar-

chitecture was finally set up
in 1906, under President Angell.
Prof. Emil Lorch was its first
chairman; the department be-
gan with an enrollment of 17
students.
It also provided for a profes-
sorship in fine arts, the teaching
of decorative design and model-
ing, and the first discussions of
city planning by visiting lecturers.
** *
DURING THE next few years,
the first study of Detroit' water-
front was made by students under
a visiting professor in the depart-
men t.
By 1926 enrollment surpassed
most schools of its type. But
courses in architecture and de-
sign were scattered through the
engineering and present phar-
inacology buildings.
In 1927, the building now occu-
pied by the architecture college
was erected. It was proposed and
designe dby Director Lorch, and
is one of the few buildings in a
harmonious group.on the campus.
THE OTHERS in this group
are Martha Cook residence hall
and the University High School-
University Elementary School
building.
(The only other such group
is the triad made up of the
General Library, the Natural
Science building and Hill Aud-
itorium.)
The department was renamed
a college in 1931, when it acquired
separate status. And seven years
later it became the College of Ar-
chitecture and Design, incorpor-
ating the literary college's Depart-
ment of Landscape Design.

Prof. Loch retired in 1939 after
a 33-year tenure. The present
dean, Wells I. Bennett, is his suc-
cessor.
Music..."
It was Henry Simmons Frieze,
called the "St. John of the fac-
ulty", who laid the foundations
of musical culture in Ann Arbor.
Among the many facets of his
genius was a remarkable ability
as a musician, and it was during
his tenure as head of the Uni-
versity Latin department and
acting president of the Univer-
sity that the Choral Union was
formed in 1879 and the Univer-
sity Musical Society the follow-
ing year.
About this time, Prof, Calvin B.
Cady entered upon his duties as
instructor in the Literary college's
Department of Music. Thorough-
ly in .sympathy with one another,
Dr. Frieze and Prof. Cady worked
unremittingly for the advance-
ment of music, both in instruction
and performance.
* * *
FROM ITS inception in 1892
until 1929, the School of Music
was maintained by the Univer-
sity Musical Society.
During this period, music was
in the literary college curricu-
lum, and it was the professor of
music in this school who served
as a liaison between the Uni-
versity and the music school.
It was not until 1923 that the
music school began to offer de-
grees upon the completion of a
four-year program which provid-
ed a more intensive and sharply-
focused training than was prev-
iously offered.

THE MUSIC school entered up-
on the second broad phase of its
existence in 1929, when the Uni-
versity assumed the responsibility
of giving the Bachelor of Music
degree and added the Master of
Music.
In 1940, through the action,
of the Board of Regents, the
music school became an integral
part of the University and both
the school and orchestra were
separated from the Musical So-
ciety.
Earl V. Moore, Director of the
music school continued to serve
both in the University Musical
Society and as head of the music
school until their separation in
1940. Until 1946 he continued as
director of the music school, when
his title was changed to that of
'Dean'.
Ten JEngineers
Join Triangle
Ten engineers were initiated
into Triangle, national social en-
gineering society, at its last meet-
ing.
Triangle, which is one of the
few fraternal organizations de-
voted entirely to persons in the
engineering field, initiated the
following juniors:
Joseph Isole, James Crane, Rob-
ert Sandell, Anthony Carnevale,
James Wright, George Barker.
Seniors initiated were: Eugene
Hicks, Edwin Brinkel, Bruce Sin-
clair, John Lyngklip.

Publication in The Iaily Official
Blletil in i oflt it1tli 1nolicc tO Atl
inembers rof the Uivesiy otices
for the Bullet in should be sent in
typewritten forn to the Office of the
Assistant to the Pa ident, Room 2:52
Admlinistraition Building, by :90 pi .m.
on the day preceding publication
(11:00 a.m. saturdavs),
THURSDAY, MAR('II 31, 1949
VOL. LIX, No. 1'9
Not ices
Faculty of the College of Liter-
ature, Science, and the Arts: There
will be no Faculty Meeting in
April. The next meeting will be
held May 2.
Hayward Keniston
Library Hours During Spring Re-
cess
From Fri., April 1, through
Sat., April 9, the General Library
will be open week-days from 8 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Study Halls within the
building and Angell Hall Study
Hall will be closed during this
time except on Sat., April 2, when
the hours will be 10 a.m. to 12
noon. Graduate Reading Rooms
will be open from 9 a.m. to 12 noon
and from 1 to 5 p.m., except on
Saturdays when they will close at
noon. There will be no Sunday
service on April 3 and 10.
In general, Divisional Libraries
will be open on short schedules,
i.e. 10-12 and 2-4 daily. Exceptions
are: the East and West Engineer-
ing Libraries which will be open
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily except
on Saturdays when they will close
at noon; the Physics Library, open
9 a.m. to 12 noon daily, closed af-
ternoons: the West Lodge Study
Hall at Willow Run which will be
closed.

Automobile Regulations, Spring
Vacation.
The automobile regulations will
be lifted for all students from noon
on Fri., April 1. until 8 a.m., April
11.
Men interested in work during
Spring vacation are advised to
imake application at the Personnel
Office, 3012 Administatio Build-
ing, 10 to 12 noon, and 3 to 5 p.m.
Men having experience in carpen-
try and painting arc especially
wanted,
Graduate students are remind -
ed that courses dropped after
noon of April 2 will be recorded
with the grade of E. Courses
dropped prior to this date will be
listed as dropped but no grade will
appear.
Women's iousing Applications
for the Fall Semester, 1949: Wom-
en students on campus now who
are not living in dormitories but
who would like to apply for dormi-
tory accommodations for the
school year 1949-50 may do so at
the Office of the Dean of Women
on April 1, 1949, beginning at 7:30
a.m. They will be accepted up to
the number of spaces available
for them. Applications will be ac-
Continuous Daily from 1:30 P.M]

eeptecd from both graduates and
undergraduates.
Women stnluents now on cam-
pus may apply for supplementary
housing for the fall semester, 1949,
at the Office of the Dean of Wom-
en on April 11. 1949. Those from
whom dormitory applications can-
not be accepted and all who prefer
this type of residence may apply
at that time.
Faculty. College of Literary,
Science and the Arts: Midsemester
reports are due not later than Fri.,
April 1.
Report, cards are being distrib-
uted to all departmental offices.
Green cards are provided for re-
porting freshmen and sophomores,
white cards for reporting juniors
and seniors. Reports of freshmen
and sophomores should be sent to
108 Mason Hall: those of juniors
and seniors to 1120 Angell Hall.
Mids em es ter reports should
name those students, freshmen,
whose standing at midsemestcr is
"D" or "E," not merely those who
receive "D" or "E" in so-called
midscinester examinations.
Students electing our courses,
but registered in other schools or
colleges of the University should
be reported to the school or col-
lege in which they are registered.
Additional cards may be had at
(Continued on Page 4)

Weekday
Matinees 25c

Evenings
& Sundays 35c

LAST DAY
at 2:40 - 6:00 & 9:15 P.M.

CLASSIFIED

ADVERTISING

- , -- -

a

FOR
SALE

VET'S
WATCH REPAIR
Is your watch a-
U. of M. Watch?----always lote.
Child's watch?-can't tell time.
Devil's watch?-gone to----
Blue Front-Packard and State
West Lodge PX-Willow Lodge

...

LAST PERFORMANCE
(The Women Have Their Way)
Delightful Comedy 'by Quintero Brothers
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

'36 CHEVY deluxe coupe, good mechan-
ical condition, good tires, radio, new
battery. Ph. days 3-1511, Ext. 2537.
Evenings 2-9671. )33
FIVE SCATTER PINS in all white or
colored rhinestones. $1.00 pr. and up.
COUSIN'S
State St.
SPECIALS AT SAM'S STORE
Genuine Levi's $3.45
100% Wool Flannel Pants $5.88
Navy "T" Shirts 49c )
TYPEWRITER --- Fine Royal portable,
$69; floure~scent desk lamp, $8; gold
Bulova man's curvex; 539 S. 5 Ave.,
day or evening. Basement Apt. )26
Tlake Home a
MICHIGAN ALBUM
by the
NOVELAI RES
See- Local Record Dealers
Write-P.O. Box 111.
Phone 2-6683 )29
1933 FORD-Good intchanical condi-
tion. Will sell cheap. 555 Packard.
) 31
SPRING STATIONERY of distinctive
design-personalized stationery-also
close-outs to suit your pocketbook.
OVERBECK'S
1216 S. University)A
RAIN OR SHINE COATS
Corduroys -- Cabardines - Taffetas
$14.95 to $16.95. All Sizes.
THE ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP
309 S. State )2
BRING SPRING to your face and use
Tussy Creamy Masque.
A $1.75 value for only $1.00.
CALKINS-FLETCHER, State St. )5
MICHIGAN Glasses and Ashtrays for
those Spring Vacation Parties.
Glasses are $4.50 a doz.
Ash Trays in two sizes at 25c and 75c.
CALKINS-FLETCHER
State St. )5
1942 NASH--26.8 miles per gal., with
overdrive and air-cond. Ph. 8618. )28
COMPLETE supply of golf equipment;
Blag Boy collapsible caddy carts,
Phone 2-2058. Johnny Malloy, Pro.
)30B
TELEVISION
Franchise Dealers for R.C.A., Motorola,
General Electric anti Stewart-Warner.
Aero Radio Sales & Service, Phone 4997.
)7
NASH 600 1948 4-door, 6,000 miles.
Radio, heater, defroster, seat covers,
hack-up lights, extra mirrors. Call
5928, 6-8 p.m. )19
IT'S A CRIME-I've outgrown my beau-
tiul $60 spring suit. Light tan her-
ringbonc weave, 37 long, 2-piece.
Coroe take it away for $35. Phone
2-6605. )22
191. PLYMOUTH sedan, new engine In
!9'), new pailt .iob in 1948. Price
1,ea:3onablc, Call Bob Gregg, 4896.
)23
CANARIES, Parrakeets, Finches, Tame
Young (ocketiel. Bird supplies and
4 gqs. t562 S. Seventh, phone 5330. )4
TUCKAWAY HOUSE
Sweatv r-Matc --Make them Yourself.
Matching Skirt and Sweater
See display 522 E. Liberty, Ph. 9582.
Margaret Nickelson Martin )9

ROOMS FOR RENT
WEEK-END rooms available in private
homes. Call Student Room Bureau,
2-8827, 11:30-12, 6:30-7:00. 1R
PRIVATE ROOM for student. Close to
campus. Call 2-3445.
iE TRANSPORTATION
DRIVING round trip to Washington,
D.C. Have space for two or three
passengers. Call 2-0786. )31T
DRIVING to Albany, April 2. Return
April 9. Can take 2 passengers. Ph.
8298. 32T
RIDE Wanted to Miami, Fia. Share ex-
penses. Call Tom 2-7444 after 6. )27T
RIDE to Denver wanted. Share expen-
ses. Call Warner, 102 Hayden, 2-4591.
26T
DRIVING to Rochester, N. Y., April 1
or 2. 2-2521 Ext. 331 or 474 after 5.
WANTED-Ride to Phila. or New York
for two students. Share expenses.
Call Vallorani, A. A. 9183, 8-10 p.m.
) 23T
COUPLE desire ride vicinity N.Y.C.
spring vac., share driving, expenses.
Atkins, 1611 Monson Ct., W.R.V. )21T
LOST
and
FOUND
LOST--Wed., blue and gold Schaei'r
pen. Ph. 2-4401, 328 Mich. Hse. )5L
LOST-Black and silver Ronson lighter.
Initials RLB, phone 8064. )2L
LOST-1 pr. plastib rim glasses in
brown leather case in the Washte-
naw - S. Univ. area. Ph. James Knox,
2-0949. )3L'
LOST-Gray Parker 51 set. Friday af-
ternoon, between new Women's Dornn
and Chem. Bldg. Call Betty, Room
5007, ph. 2-6581. )4L
LOST--Partly done needlepoint. Brown
background. Call 5100 after 7:00 p.m.
and leave message. Barbara Cook.
LOST at Odonto Ball - Pearl setting
from ring. Ph. 2-9266. Reward. 99L
PICKED UP wrong jacket at Michigan
Theater Saturday. Will exchange for
my own. Call Herron, 4183. )98L
BROWN SILK scarf lost vicinity of
Fisher's Drug. If found, please call
Robert Kuhn, ph. 2-4591. )96L
BLUE FABRIC WALLET lost In Burton
Tower on Feb. 28. Contents needed
desperately. Reward. Mary Hammond.
Ph. 2-7328, 1014 Vaughn St. )58L

BACHELOR apartment with privat e
bath, one block from Hutchins Hall.
Call 2-8565. )18F
SINGLE and % of double room, near
campus. Ph. 5224. )11R
For good accommodations
bring your overnight or
weekend guests to the'
PIERCE TRANSIENT HOME
1133 . Ann Phone 8144
/ HELP WANTED
VETERAN of K-9 Corps to train dog;
short period of day. Convenient time
arrangements. Call 9836. )21H
BUSINESS
SERVICES
SPEED-O-TYPING SERVICE - Clean,
neat, accurate. Phone 2-6441. Reas-
onable rates (free pick-up and de-
livery). )34B
2 Day Service on Shirts
HOME QUALITY LAUNDRY
215 E. Washington Tel. 9035 )33B
WASHINGS and Ironing done in pri-
vate home. Free pick up and de-
livery. Ph. 25-0767. )323
EXCESS HAIR removed permanently
by Short Wave Method. Approved by
Am. Med. Ass'n. Call L. Gagalis at
Marie's Beauty Shop, 2-6696. )31B
EXPERT repair service done on all
typewriters. Mosely Typewriter Co.,
214 E. Washington. )23B
DANCE MUSIC
Chuck Downer and his orchestra
Ph. 25-0031 )27B
DRESSMAKING ALTERATIONS
TAILORING
Orders 'T'aken for
Aniy Type of Uniform
Reasonable Rates 2-20201
)3B1
LAUNDRY - Washing and/or ironing.
Done in my own home. Have stretch-
er for wool socks. Free pickup and
delivery. Phone 2-9020. )2B
LEARN TO [DANCE
JIMMIE HUNT DANCE STUDIOS
209 S. State St. Ph. 8161 )5B
CUSTOM CLOTHES. Restyling. Alter-
ations. Prompt service on all altera-
tions. Hildegarde Shoppe. 109 E.
Washington. Phone 2-4669. )4B

I

PERSONALS

COOLEY-Mackenzie Alumni Basketball
game followed by dance at Mackenzie
gym., Sat., April 2, 7:30 p.m. )29P
A MESSAGE-To our missing salesman:
We don't fix parking tickets and stop
sending people iin for parking mi-eter
change. Office Equipment Service
Company. 1116S . University. ) lB
SHIP 'N Shore Blouses. Sanforized cot-
ton, whites, colors and plaids, $2.95.
Randall's Specialty Shop, 306 S. State.
)1P
SUCCESSFUL SENIORS subscribe to
TIME. Your last chance to save $1.50
by subscribing at the low college
rates. $5.00 for yr. Phone 2-82-42,
Student Periodical Agency. Order
now. Your subscription starts when
you have a permanent address.
BABY SITTERS - Call Kiddie Kare,
2-93 fno answer, 25-7364. )28B3
CORSAGES
CAMPUS CORSAGE SERVICE
Phone 2-7032 )25B
jLOVE YOU DOLL
)28P
to 5 P.M.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
-- Now Thru Saturday -

JOTN
WALTER BRENNAN
Montgomery, CLI Ft ea nne DRU
REIA',0 "rU Uft~ .R' F
Plu ! Happy Fun!
"LET'S LIVE AGAIN"
Coming Friday
PRESTON FOSTER
"THUNDERHOOF"
Pius!
EAST SIDE KIDS
"SMUGGLER'S COVE"

81f1

FOR RENT

WANTED TO RENT
APT. WANTED by student and wife for
summer session only. Call collect.
Dearborn, Cedar 6645 after 5. )9W

A NEW UASTLE FUN FILAi
4N
Abbott talks Costello into a wrestling match
with The Masked Marvel and it's a strangle-
'hold of laughs to a roaring finish! Own il!
AND HERE'S ANOTHER CASTLE
LAUGH HIT YOU CAN OWNI
ABBOTT AND COSTELLO
in
"No Indians, Please"
The wildest, wackiest Western
ever filmed!
Available for rent or sale
in 16 mm. and 8 mm.
Purchase Radio
& Camera Shop
605 Church

MICIGA~N

NOW!
35c until 5 P.M.

Curtain at 8:00 P.M.

All Seats Reserved .. .

75c

nsr iwwiwm-

Whether you want a tasty
snack, or delicious dinner,
you'll have an enjoyable
time in our relaxing at-
mosphere. Be pleasantly
surprised, when you pick
up the modest check.

At the te
9
WOLVERINE
DEN
1309 South University
Open: 11 A.M. to 12 P,M.

ORPH E
From All N
Em ily Bronte's po
adapted to t,
Bea Hecht and Chi
thur . . . produced
wvyn --radition of o~

This Weekend
UM For students and faculty
remaining in Ann Arbor.
ations
werfult novel
he screen by
~arles MacAr*
SAMUEL GOLDWYN presents
HEIGHTS"
MERLE OBERON . LAURENCE OLIVIER
DAVID NIVEN
S et lls

POR SALE-Tails. size 38.
and shoes. Call 5054 after:

accessories
5 p.m.

F
3z
:
s

TWO
CHARMING
PEOPLE
WHO
LEARNED
TO RELAX
AND
ENJOY.-

TONIGHT 8:30 P.M.
* * kK.
1948=49 LECTURE COURSE
presents

Gene
TIERNEY

r

in
tr

"is
I

I

I

- '~&~ IL A~ ~ I I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan