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March 30, 1949 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WtIEDNTSDA , NM

..,.

LOCAL VIEWPOINT:
MedisGiveVaried Replies
To Army's 'Reenlist' Plea

By DON KOTITE
An Army Medical Corps appeal
for former ASTP and V-12 stu-
dents to "realize their moral obli-
gation" and re-enlist in the armed
forces has prompted a variety of
opinions from affected men on
campus.
Ranging from a complete favor'
to partial sympathies and outright
denials of the plea, sentiments
were obtained from young in-
ternes serving at University Hos-
pital.
* ~* *
ALSO contacted were members
of campus medical and dental fra-
ternities.
The general belief is that two
years in the Army Medical Corps
now would be a waste of time pro-
fessionally. Many expressed the
view that reenlistment would set
their medical careers back two
years.
Those interviewed receivedall
or part of their pre-medical
education at government ex -
pense during the war, and are
now deferred from the draft to.
complete their studies.
Army medical authorities are
now faced with an acute shortage
of physicians and dentists, and
have termed the situation a "criti-
cal handicap." By July of this
year, one-third of the 4900 medi-
cal officers now in Army service
will have been lost due to comple-
tion of tours of duty, they esti-
mated.
A STATEMENT by Secretary
Forrestal at a recent press con-
ference underscored the alleged
need for an influx of medical en-
listmente.
"A 27 per cent decrease in Med-
ical Corps officer ranks and a sim-
ilar drop in Dental Corps numbers
has made the outlook dark. "I be-
lieve deferred physicians and den-
tists recognize our right of ap-
peal," he declared.
But despite Army :lures, most
of the interviewees feel they
have no special obligation to
fulfill. -
"I think the overall sentiment is

anti-reenlistment," said Donald
Frederickson, president of Phi
Rho Sigma medical fraternity and
an ASTP member for 15 months.
"Some may be joining for mon-
ey, but it seems to me finances are
secondary to- professional consid-
eration. And our careers would be
somewhat retarded," he added.
Graydon Forrer, three years
under the ASTP program, rec-
ognizes the "issue of indebted-
ness" involved but feels the
Army makes too many promises
that never come true.
"I understand the Army is cur-
rently trying to improve their
training procedures, but as yet
training is not up to par. It's just
one of those chances you take
when you join ASTP or V-12," he
said.
* * *
MANY professional men were
wasted in Army service, according
to former V-12 student Richard
Alford, an ex-worker in Bain-
bridge Navy Hospital.
"At Bainbridge, one doctor was
assigned to the care of every 70
men, with an ensuing reluctance
to work. I can't see it as a fur-
thering of medical education," he
commented.
On the other hand, however,
Thomas Stowkowowski feels
this "moral obligation" to the
Army.
"I worked my way through pre-
med courses for two years, and it
was rough. But I am definitely,
rejoining the army after finishing
my interneship."
Robert Pierce, a 2-year ASTP
man, reported a new slant on the
affair. Although he can't see any
obligation, "I am still interested
in making a career of the Arniy
Medical Corps, no matter what,"
he said.
* * *
"NO COMMENT" was the an-
swer of 'U' Hospital intern Dr.
Paul Campbell, quizzed at his hos-
pital quarters.
But Dr. William Powell, a fel-
low intern of Campbell's who
plans to finish his apprenticeship
in July, definitely thought there
is an obligation.
"Specialists' jobs are the main
thing with us. In the Army we
could work as general practi-
tioners for a while, but mean-
while our training doesn't get
much of an impetus."
"A career in the Army would
definitely be a delayed step," he
said.
Dr. Paul V. Kiehl, in charge of
Medical ROTC and a Resident in
Surgery here, called a Washington
proposal to pass a draft law' for
men reluctant to recall their for-
mer ASTP service "the fairest so-
lution."

Spanish Club
The thespians of La Sociedad
Hispanica will pres ent "La Puebla "
de las Mujeres" t 8 p.m. tod y
and tomorrow night at Lydi Men-
delssohn Theatre.
The play, a comedy by the y
brothers Quintero, reveals life in
a small town in southern Spain.4
It is the story of what happens r
to an innocent young man who
comes to the town on business.
THE YOUNG MAN, played by
Carlos Soares, becomes involved in
a romance with the belle of the!
town, played by Nanette Emery.
The affair is perpetrated by
the gossiping women of the
town, but ends happily for all1
concerned, for, as the sub-title
tells us, "the women have their
way."
Others in the cast are Joseph,
Plazonja as the village priest, Al-
vin Mendelson as the town doctor,
Elizabeth Clapham as the big
gossip, John Riccardo as the town
bully, Georgina Fierro, Ethel Cada,
Murray Budney, Elizabeth Iden,
Thelma Fife, Naomi Gaberman,
Rose Marie Levin and Jack Stein-
helper.
THE PRODUCTION is under
the direction of Anthony Pasquar-
iello of the Spanish department.
"Puebla de las Mujeres" was
performed for the first time in
1912 in Madrid. It was presented HISPANOI
first . in the United States in Clapham,r
1930 in New York City where year's Spa
it met with much success, re- brothers(
ceiving the praise of such twns i
critics as Brooks Atkinson.
The Quintero brothers, who were tomorrowr
born in southern Spain, specialized
in portraying the customs and
people of their homeland. their optimi
: ,:"Puebla de 1
THEY DID ALL their writing matize a fa
as a team and were known for power of gos

I

Joint Meet
The Atlantic Pact was the Sub-
ject of a debate last night spon-
sored jointly by the United World
Federalists and the United Na-
tions Council.
David P. Leonard, of the his-
tory department. argued negative-
ly on the question "Is the Atlantic
Pact a Move for Peace?" George
A. Peek, of the political science
department, took t he affirmative
stand.
PEEK MAINTAINED that this
is a world of power politics and
the only realistic way to main-
tain peace is to achieve a balance
of power. He said that the Pact
would achieve such a balance, and
as such, it Ls a positive move to-
ward peace.
On the other hand Leonard
said, "History has never shown
that power alliances have pre-
vented wars. In many instances
they can be traced as the cause
of wars."
"One of the things about the
pact I especially object to," said
Leonard, "is the manner in which
the State Department has com-
mitted this country to accept the!
pact before the public even knew
its contents." *
BOTH SPEAKERS agreed that
the Pact would easily receive Sen-
ate approval.
Peek emphasized the import-
ance of the Pact in making our
policy clear to Russia. "The prob-
lem today," he said, "is not so
much one of Russian aggrandize-
ment as it is of American weak-
ness."

The woild of tomorrow faces an
economy saddIled with go enment
regulat ions an1 toi'i in the tur-
lilils01 01 )lu '4su e goups.
predicted Prof. II oward Ellis, of
the Univer Aty of California, who
spoke here y('strdlay.
Speaking: on 1Ihe Economist's
Way of Thinkig.," Ellis said,
Hgh standards of living, coupled
with r recdom of choice among va-
rious goods and jobs, are the basic
goa:I of the economi:t.
THESE VREEI)OMS must be
S iensSeek
Spriongsjobs
More than 150 University stu-
dents are looking for jobs helping
with spring cleaning or (arly gar-
den work during ithe Spring vaca-
tion.
Planning to remain in Ann Ar-
bor during the holidays, these stu-
dents are available for full or part-
time yard work, window washing
or other odd jobs. according to
University Personnel officers. A
few are skilled in carpentry, paint-
ing and gardening.
Arrangements for employment
of any of these studcents may be
macle by calling Gordon Critchell,
University P e rson n elil Office,
3-1511, Extension 2621.

based on a syste n of political
guarantees, he said. "But.. when
the group making the choice be-
comes tOO big, Iolitics step in and
the economists fade out.
"No one will deny the neces-
sity for economic planning,"
Ellis stated. "But all our plans
seem to abridge individual
choice, and replace it with the
decisions of the bureaucratic of-
ficial."
Here, he added, lies the ground-
work for the totalitarian world of
tomorrow.
* *
"THE ECONOMIST faces the
problem of applying a set of a
analytical tools in a world where
supply of goods is limited, and de-
mand for them never satisfied,"
Ellis explained.
It is the duty of thO econom-
ist, he continued, to deserve the
methods that people employ in
making their choices among the
various goods that they may
have.
Prof. Ellis was the seventh in a
series of distinguished lecturers.
Sponsored by the economics de-
partment.
TRY OUR GENUINE
ITALIAN
SPAGHETTI
Served Daily and
To Take Ou.
Also
* SANDWICHES
* FRENCH FRIES
* PLATE LUNCHES
0 FOUNTAIN
SERVICE
302 South Main
Phone 8916

Tr, Give Play

Recent Pact Ellis Sees More Eeononie
Debuied aI Coiltrols, Pressure groups

Daily-Barth
PIIILES--Pictured from left to right are Elizabeth
Carlos Soares and Nanette Emery in a scene from this
nish play, "La Puebla de las Mujeres," a comedy by the
Quintero portraying the power of gossip in a small
outhern Spain. The play is being given tonight and
night at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.

* -

'5

stic outlook on life. In All seats for tre two perform-
as Mujeres" they dra- ances are reserved. Tickets are
vorable result of the $.75 and may be purchased at the
sip. Lydia Mendelssohn box office.

Cliff Hoff
Every
FRI. and SAT. NIGHT
211 S. State St.

1 9

CLASSIFIED

ADVEBTISING

liII

i3

A

ANT-ED TO RENT
ROOM WANTED-Very near University
Terrace for British ar-bride's mo-
ther on 2 month's visit, starting April
19. Call 2-6221.

II

1 /

HELP WANTED

AL.

LOST
and
FOUND

. '

FOR
SALE

' Qa

FOR RENT

Dance
Every
FRI. and SAT. NIGHT
211 S. State St.

VETERAN of K-9 Corps to train dog
short period of day. Convenient time
arrangements. Call 9836. )2111
3 YOUNG Men, 3 Young women for
p~art-timne work. (:olefge st udeni
preferred. Apply Mr. :Baker, Hot.e I
Allenel, Tues. and Wed. from 3 p.m
to 7 p.m. )20H

Where
GOOD STUDENTS
Meet for
GOOD FOOD
Open Daily
7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.
Closed Sundays
MI ELKE'S
Cafe
120 E. Washington St.
35c to 5 P.M.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
Last Day
ABT.COSTELLO
Sta T
Starts Thursday

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of
the Assistant to the President, Room
2552 Administration Building, by 3:00
p.m. on the day preceding publica-
tion (11:00 a.m. Saturdays).

SINGLE and % of double room, near
campus. Ph. 5224. )11R
For good accommodations
bring your overnight or
weekend guests to the
PIERCE TRANSIENT HOME
1133 E. Ann Phone 8144
WANTED TO RENT
FURNISHED apartment for three Uni-
versity staff members. Summer and
winter occupancy beginning June 15.
Call Mr. Jacobson or Mr. Charters.
evenings after 8 at 7605. )8W
____TRANSPORTATION
CHICAGO AREA: Leaving Union 5:15
Friday for Gary. Call Earl Borseth,
Dearborn LOgan 14082 after 8. )30T
FOR SALE-One way R.R. ticket to
N.Y.C. $19. Call McLean 9559. )28r
COUPLE hiking to Ithaca, N.Y.-and
back, over vacation. Will share ex-
penses, change tires and babies, tell
amusing stories, sing, dance, and
drive. Can leave any time. Call Tom
and Mary Lough, 6852. ) 29T
RIDE Wanted to Miami. Fla. Share ex-
penses. Call Tom 2-7444 after 6. )27T
RIDE to Denver wanted. Share expen-
ses. Call Warner, 102 Hayden, 2-4591.
26T
DRIVING to Rochester, N. Y., April 1
or 2. 2-2521 Ext. 331 or 474 after 5.
COUPLE will share expenses with driv-
er in direction of Evansville, Mem-
phis, New Orleans on April 1. Phone
2-7986.
WANTED-Ride to Phila. or New York
for two students. Share expenses.
Call Vallorani, A. A. 9183, 8-10 p.m.
)23T
COUPLE desire ride vicinity N.Y.C.
spring vac., share driving, expenses.1
Atkins, 1611 Monson Ct., w.R.V. )21T
DRIVING to Akron, Ohio, April 1. Room1
for 4-5 passengers. Ph. 2-2035. )20T
WANTED-Ride to Upper Michigan,
Gladstone or vicinity, will share ex-
pensesand driving on April 1 or 2.
Call Sam Cassidy, 5476. })19T
COUPLE desires ride to N.Y. April 1st.
Share driving, expenses. Call Irv.,
2-8797. )7T
--i

2 Day Service on Shirts
HOME QUALITY LAUNDRY
215 E. Washington Tel. 9035 )33B
WASHINGS and Ironing done in pri-
vate home. Five pak U, ) ( and de-
livery. Ph. 25-0767.)31
SPECIALS AT SAMS STORE
uine Levi', $3.45,
100, Woo] Ilannel Pants. $5.88
Nuv'"' lirs, 49c.
)3
EXCESS HAIR removed permanently
by Short Wave Method. Approved by
Am. Med. Ass'n. Call L. Gagalis at
Marie's Beauty Shop, 2-6696. )31B
EXPERT repair service done on all
typewriters. Mosely Typewriter Co.,
214 E. Washington. )23B
DANCE MUSIC
Chuck Downer and his orel'iestra
Ph. 25-0031 )27B
DRESSMAKING ALTERATIONS
TAILORING
Orders Taken for
Any Type of Uniform
Reasonabl Raes U 2-2020
3F3
LAUNDRY -- washing and/or ironing.
Done in my own home. Have stretch-
er for wool socks. Free pickup and
delivery. Phone 2-9020. )2B
LEARN TODAINCE
JIMMIE HUNT DANCE STUDIOS
209 S. State St. Ph. 8161 )5B
CUSTOM CLOTHES. Restyling. Alter-
ations. Prompt service on all altera-
tions. Hildegarde Shoppe. 109 E.
Washington. Phone 2-4669. )4B
Read and Use T&

BUSINESS
SERVICES

wZ

PERSONALS

ltzz

UNION OPERA, FROGGY BOTTOM,
cast and staff only, meeting 7 p.m.
tonight, room 3G Union. Finance re-
port, play back of entire show, re-
cordings, photographs, discuss possi-
bilities of permanent organization.
AN OVERSEAS cablegram x Missing
salesman x 210004 Bt. What are you
doing on a slow boat to China x
Royal makes foreign language type-
writers but not Chinese. Return to
Ann Arbor x Office Equipment Ser-
vice Co., 1116 S. University. )IB
SHIP 'N Shore Blouses. Sanforized cot-
ton, whites, colors and plaids, $2.95.
Randall's Specialty Shop, 306 S. State.
-lop
SUCCESSFUL SENIORS subscribe to
TIME. Your last chance to save $1.50
by subscribing at the low college
rates. $5.00 for yr. Phone 2-82-42,
Student Periodi al Agency. Order
flow. Your subscription starts when
you have a permanent address.
BABY SITTERS - Call Kiddie Kare,
2-1903; if no answer, 25-7364. )28B
CORSAGES
CAMPUS CORSAGE SERVICE
Phone 2-7032 )25B
w Daily Classified

LOST-Partly done needlepoint. Brown
background. Call 5100 after 7:00 p.m.
and leave message. Barbara Cook.
)lL
LOST at. Odonto P3U-1earl1 settig
from ring. Ph.-t;. Reward. 991,
PICKED UP wroingjalkot at Michigan
Theater Saiturd-y. Will excliange for
my own. Cal 11 om. 418:. )9811
LOST Glasse; iti H llelzapoppln. IP1.
1B0b Stahl, 42 1, 971L
BROWN SILK scarf lost vleinity of
Fisher's Drug. If found, please call
Robert Kuhn, ph. 2-4591. )90L
BLUE FABRIC WALLET lost in Burton
Tower on Feb. 28. Contents needed
desperately. Reward. Mary Hammond.
Ph. 2-7328, 1014 Vaughn St. )58L

TWO 'TICKETS for all concerts to
May Festival for sale. $21.60. Call
Betty Parmenter, 24217. )27
TYPEWRITER - Fine Royal portable.
$69: flourescent desk lamp, $$8; gold
Bulova ma n's curvex:: 539 .5.5 Ave.,
dy or evening. Ba-melnt Apt . 26
..... .. Take Home a
M I C H IGA AL L BUM
by Ihe
NOVELAIRES
See-Local 'ecordt1 atd'
Wl'ite- P0 .Boy; 111
Phone 2-6683 )29
A GIRL'S English Bicycle with gears,
never used. Also light weight Schwin
two months old. Phone 2-1581, Room
308. );30
1933 FORD--Good mechanical condi-
tion. Will sell cheap. 555 Packard.
) 31
All Nylon Slips. Lace Trimmed at
$4.69. Sizes 30-38.
COUSINS
State St. )
SPRING STATIONERY of distinctive
design-personalized stationery--aiso
close-outs to suit your pocketbook.
OVERBECK'S
1216 S. University )0
RAIN OR SHINE COATS
Corduroys -- Gabardines - Taffetas
$14.95 to $16.95. All Sizes.
THE ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP
309 S. State )2
BRING SPRING to your face and use
Tussy Creamy Masque.
A $1.75 value for only $1.00.
CALKINS-FLETCHER, State St. )5
MICHIGAN Glasses and Ashtrays for
those Spring Vacation Parties.
Glasses are $4.50 a doz.
Ash Trays in two sizes at 25c and 75c.
CALKINS-FLE'rCHE'R
State St. )5
1942 NASH-26.8 miles per gal., with
overdrive and air-cond. Ph. 8618. )28
PLY. '37 exc. condition. Newly painted.
Best offer. Call 7 p.m., Ypsi., 9268.
Rm. 7. )25
COMPLETE supply of golf equipment;
Bag Boy collapsible caddy carts.
Phone 2-2058. Johnny Malloy, Pro.
30B
TELEVISION
Franchise Dealers for R.C.A, Motorola,
General Electric and Stewart-Warner.
Aero Radio Sales & Service, Phone 4997.
)7
NASH 600 1948 4-door, 6,000 miles.
Radio, heater, defroster, seat covers,
back-up lights, extra mirrors. Call
5928, 6-8 p.m. )19
IT'S A CRIME-I've outgrown my beau-
tiful $60 spring suit.- Light tan her-
ringbone w a % (% 37lo. 2-piece.
Come take it away for $.;5. Phone
2-6605. )22
1941 PLYMOUTH sedan, new engine in
1947, new paint job in 1948. Price
reasonable. Call Bob Gregg, 4896.
)23
CANARIES, Parrakeets, Finches, Tame
Young Cocketiel. Bird supplies and
cages. 562 S. Seventh, phone 5330. )4
TUCKAWAY HOUSE
Sweater-Mates-Make them Your'self,
MV~athiag Skirt aind Sweate'r
See display "122 1-,. Literty, Ph. 9532.
Margaret Nickelsun Martin )9
FOR SALE-Tails, size 38. accessories
and shoes. Call 5054 after 5 p.m. s

1I " -onriU OLS Mu 1:,5V u r .n -
mow71J p!J NOW1 & THURS.!
ADVENTURE... HOWARD HAWKS GREAT PRODUCTION
EA ITEMENT...
SrPECTACLE...

OPENING TONIGHT!
da q 1a d ATiElt E4
Delightful Comedy by Quintero Brothers
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

Curtain at 8:00 P.M.

\..AJI I'll iLJ~J'..4Z, I IUI I ,J'.J V

RELEASED TH~RU UNITED ARTISTS

F

A

All Seats Rescrvcd . . 75c

Starring JOHN WAYNE 0 MONTGOMERY CLIFT
Shown At 2:40 - 6:00 & 9:15 P.M.

Plus!---
Happy "t's L Agi"
Fun! "-ets Live Again"

JOHN EMERY
HILLIARY BROOKE

("nr)Fini " ic. rrnm 1 - in P m

I

FRESH FISH

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30,
VOL. LIX, No. 128

For the finest in
SEA FOOD
during
every season

1949

Notices
Spring Recess begins Friday
evening, April 1. Classes resume
Monday morning, April 11.
Regents' Meeting: April 30, 9
a.m. Communications for consid-
eration at this meeting must be
in the President's hands not later
than April 21.
Herbert G. Watkins, Secretary
(Continued on Page 4)

0
Liberty Fish& Chips
RESTAURANT
301 EAST LIBERTY STREET
Hlours: 11 A.M.-12 P.M. 'til 1 A.M. Fri. & Sat.

'_ 1

,

Ending
TODAY

MICHIGAN

35c until
5 o'clock

99.3% of All Patrons Like This Show!
CAN YOU ASK FOR MORE?
THERE SHOULDBEA
SPECIAL AWARD
FOR MAKING 3 V *Figure dreamed up

STARTS TODAY
TkEru Friday
Mat. 'til 5 30c Nights 40c
No. Main Opp. Court House PLUS -_ ---_____
-- ~DISCJOCKEY -
JIVE
CRASHNG THRe"r

OR PH E
neFrom All
E, mit Brionte 'p
adpedIo ea Hiechit and Cl
t hur . ..)podu~(ced

This Weekend
UM For studentsand faculty
u ps remaining in Ann Arbor.
lotions
oWerful novel r
hai le.> MacAr'
ill the Gold-
SAMUEL GOLf)WYN peet
HEIGHT~S"
cELEcER rrirg
MERLE OBERON " LAURENCE OLIVIER
DAVID NLVEN

5
r

PEOPLE LAUGH

ny press agenr..poa
non-scent.f . p .ll

THE LOUDEST And this picture would get it!

1948-49 LECTURE COURSE
presents
CLFINF D-A

Jack Carson

Ronald Reagan

Edward Arnold

I

11 "John Loves Mary"

a ,.

I

I

i f

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