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March 29, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-29

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PAGE. SIX

TE AT-IC IGAUSSAALY

TUESDAY. i

r c.

1 Ir I t

Swinton Cites
Correspondent'
Requirements
Stresses Background
In Country's Affairs
"You must know the language,
the politics and the people of the
nation or area you are covering if
you are going to gather and inter-
pret the news accurately and ef-
fectively," Stan Swinton, '40, said
in yesterday's journalism lecture.
According to the former chief
of the Associated Press' Southeast
Asia Bureau, a correspondent
should figure on doing a lot of
intensive reading about his assign-
ment before he actually reaches
it.
"OTHERWISE, he will be
spending much of his first few
months on the job studying local
conditions."
A diplomat's tact and suavity
are also pretty essential for a
a foreign correspondent, Swin-
ton said.
uiting problems encountered
during the Indonesian revolt,
Swinton remarked that the corre-
spondent must be especially care-
ful in handling' news coming from
two opposing governments or
forces.
Fadiman Talk
To End Series
Clifton Fadiman, seventh lec-
turer for the Oratorical Series, will
close the 1948-49 season at 8:30
p.m. Thursday when he speaks on
"Our Writers, Our Country and
Our Planets" in Hill Auditorium.
Fadiman is replacing Rebecca
West who was originally sched-
uled. West tickets will be accepted
for admission.
A NATIVE NEW YORKER and
a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of
Columbia University, Fadiman has
been a steady contributor to mag-
azines and newspapers for almost
a quarter of a century. He is per-
haps best known for his job as
master of ceremonies of the "In-
formation Please" program.
Tickets to the Fadiman lecture
will go on sale at the auditorium'
box office tomorrow.

Xtaftat in ht...
with Herb Rovner

There's been a new addition to
the radio world . . unwelcome as
it may be.
The dull piece of trivia is called
for some obscure reason the Henry
Morgan Show and stars such well-
known personalities as Fred Allen
(its eager sponsor), Patsy Kelley
and Arnold Stang, to mention
three ingredients of this unsavory
potage.
AS I UNDERSTAND it, Mr.
Allen decided to revive Henry
Morgan-though as far as this re-
viewer is concerned he might have
let him enjoy a tranquil death-
in an attempt to divert radio fans
from "Stop the Music," which is
broadcast at the some time as the
Henry Morgan Show.
However, the world-wise, wise-
cracking Mr. Allen should cer-
tainly be aware of the fact that
as long at "Stop the Music"
continues to offer thousands of
greenbacks to its radio public,
Mr. Morgan and company don't
stand a chance.
In fact, Morgan has already
conceded his defeat. Or, at least, so
I assumed from listening to one of
Morgan's conferees commenting
on the new show. Said Morgan's
neighborhood grocer, "My radio
has never been used so much. Cus-
tomers keep switching to other
programs."
The sad fate of Mr. Morgan,
who was for a while radio's most
engaging comic, is that his show
lacks all the zip and sparkle that

HENRY MORGAN
... Falling Star
;. *
made last year's shows tops on
the Hooper.
This year, however, Morgan's
gags sag, lag and drag. Maybe
some listeners like this new flat
and insipid comedian; but per-
sonally, I prefer the irrepressible,
sardonic lampooner who was the
scourge of the dignity-loving man
-an individual who bore the
brunt of Morgan's attacks. As far
as I am concerned, Henry Morgan
and "straight humor" is nix.

Spanish Play To Be Presented

Carlos Soares, - '49Grad., and
Nanette Emery, '49Grad., will play
the roles of the hero and heroine
respectively in the play "Puebla
de las Mujeres" which is to be
given by La Sociedad Hispanica
at 8 p.m. tomorrow and Thursday
at Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Others in the cast are Joseph
Plazonja, Georgina Fierro, Ethel
Cada, Elizabeth Clapham, Murray
Budney, Elizabeth Iden, Thelma
Fife, John Riccardo, Naomi Ga-
berman, Alvin Mendelson, Rose
Marie Levin, and Jack Steinhel-

per. Tickets may now be pur-
chased at the box office.
"Puebla de las Mujeres," which
is subtitled, "The Women Have
Their Way," is the story of a
young man who comes to a small
town in southern Spain on bus-
iness and soon finds himself en-
tangled in a romantic affair
brought about by the town gossips.
Delicate Device
WASHINGTON - Instruments
used by Navy scientists to measure
infrared sun rays were so delicate
and complex it took a year to in-
stall them in an airplane.

Vets T old To
Plan Summer
Session Now
Veterans planning to utilize G.I
Bill benefits for the coming
summer session must begin now
to make necessary arrangements
for Veterans Administration elig-
ibility certificates, the VA an-
nounced yesterday.
Those already in school under
the Bill intending to continue
their educations this summer in
a different school have been ad-
vised to apply immediately for a
supplementary certificate of elig-
ibility, VA officers added.
-* * *
THEY POINTED out that these
vets must have their supplemen-
tary certificates before they can
expect admittance to new schools
or courses.
If a veteran is not presently
in training but holds an unused
certificate of eligibility issued
prior to Sept. 1, 1948, he must
obtain a new one if he plans
to attend summer school, the
VA said.
Those without certificates of
any kind and intending to go to
summer school are advised to
make certificate application at his
nearest regional VA office.
* * *
VETERANS MAY obtain appli-
cation forms from the University's.
registrar's office or from any VA
office. The completed application
must then be sent on to the VA
regional office at 52 Starling St.,
Columbus 8, O.
Campus
Calendar
EVENTS TODAY
Bebop Session-Dizzie Gillespie,
called the foremost exponent of be-
bop today, will perform, 8 p.m.,
Pattengill Auditorium.
Phi Iota Alpha-Miguel Her-
nandez Agosto will speak on so-
cial reform in Puerto Rico, 8 p.m.,
International Center.
International Students Associ-
ation-Meets at 7 p.m. today, In-
ternational Center.
Club Europa - Discussion of
travelling in Europe for vacation-
ers and students, 8:30 p.m. in In-
ternational Center.
United Wor1d Federalists -
Round Table: "Is the North At-
lantic Pact a Move for Peace?",
7:30 p.m., Union.
Young Republicans - Election
meeting, 7:30 p.m. Cave Room,
League.
Fine Arts League-Prof. Alex-
ander Soper to discuss "Buddha in
the Cave," 4:15 p.m., Kellogg Au.
ditorium.
'U' Symplhony
To Perform
The University Symphony Or-
chestra, conducted by Wayne
Dunlap, will give its Spring con-
cert at 8 p.m. tomorrow in Hill
Auditorium.
First half of the program will
be devoted to Igor Stravinsky's
"Divertimento from 'Le Baiser de
la Fee.'"
* * *
A BALLET allegory in four tab-
leaux, "Divertimento" was in-
spired by the muse of Tchaikow-
sky, according to Dunlap.
After the intermission, the
110-piece orchestra will play

Gustav Mahler's monumental
work, "Das Lied von der Erde"
(Song of the Earth.)
The composition consists of six
Chinese songs, which will be sung
by Prof. Harold Haugh, tenor,
and Arlene Sollenberger, contralto,
both of the music school.
The program will be open to the
public.

(Continued from Page 4)
Michigan Union. Sponsored
UWF and UN Council.

by

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Square Dance Group: 7 p.m.,
Lane Hall.
Coming Events
House Directors' Institute: Final
meeting for staff members in
Women's Residence Halls, League
Houses and Sororities, Wed.,
March 30, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.,
Michigan League. Subject: "Atti-
tudes in Counseling." Lois L. Wat-
erman, Director of Student Per-
sonnel, East Grand Rapids High
School.
Phi Beta Kappa: Annual meet-
ing Wed., March 30, 4:15 p.m.,
1035 Angell Hall. Members are
urged to attend.
Union Opera, Froggy Bottom,
cast and staff only, meeting 7
Scholarships
Available Now
Applications for general under-
graduate scholarships must be
submitted to the Student Affairs
Office by Thursday.
Application blanks for the
scholarships which are open to
students with one or more semes-
ters work at the University may
be obtained from Ivan W. Parker,
assistant to the Dean of Students,
in the Student Affairs Office.
AMONG THE scholarships
which are open at this time are
the Eugene G. Fassett Scholar-
ships, consisting of three or four
awards of from $150 to $200 each,
and the Ben and Lucille Braun
Scholarships amounting to $400.
In addition, four Abbott Schol-
arships amounting to $500 each
will be awarded to Protestant,
Caucasian women of American
parentage.

p.m.. Wed.. March 30. Finance re
port, play back of entire :how,.re
cordings, photorraphs, discuss pos
sibilities of permanent organiza
tion.
Delta Sigma Pi, Professiona
business administration fraterni
ty: Meeting, Wed.. March 30, 7:3
p.m., Chapter House, 1212 Hill.
Graduate Student Council
Meeting, Wed., March 30, 7:3
p.m. West Lecture Hall, Rackhar
Bldg.
Modern Poetry Club: Wed., 7:3
p.m., 3231 Angell Hall, Prof
Greenhut will lead a discussion o
the poetry of E. E. Cummings.
Flying Club: Open meeting, 7:3
p.m., Wed., March 30, 1042 E. En
gineering Bldg. Board meeting,"
p.m.
U. of M. Theater Guild: Try
outs for Maxwell Anderson's "Win
terset," 8 p.m., Wed., March 30
Cave room, Michigan League.
Coed Folk and Square Dancin
Club: Wed., 7:30 p.m., W.A.B
Bring dues.
HILLEL UJA Central Commit
tee: Meeting, Wed., 4:15 p.m
Michigan Union, for all member
and other interested students.
I.Z.F.A.: Beginning Study Group

al
i-

Wed., March 30,
gan Union.

50 POSTERS
ROACH PRINT Ha FOR S. L.

7:45 p.m., Mich

mw

LUBRICATING

WASHING

GEO. W. CAMP
Standard Oil Service
Packard at Hill Street

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on

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Whether you want a tasty WOLVERINE
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Ask for it either way ... both
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BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY
&NN ARBOR COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY
© 1949. The Coca-Cola Company

TIRES

ACCESSORIES

. ,.. ..

li

MONTH-END SALE
CONTINUING THRU THURSDAY

NOW Is THE HOUR
Send Kyer Model Laundry your blankets be-
fore you leave for Spring Vacation. When you
return we will have them ready for you, sci-

$1000 -*$1300

- $1800

BETTER, DRESSES ORIGINALLY to $29.95
One and Two Piece Styles
This Includes a Group of Formal Gowns
Sizes 9 to 15 - 10 to 44- 121/2 to 241/

3 GROUPS OF SUITS
$45.00 - $55.00 - $65.00
Tweeds - Gabardines - Wool Crepes
Sizes 9-15 - 10-44 - 1612 to 2412

r - ° - f -
Brightest of all
8mm projectors

3-SEASON ZIP TOPPER $59.95
By Printzess - By Sycamore
Group of NYLON HOSE 1.39 by "Townwear" and Hole-
proof. Ultra-sheen 51 gauge. Originally 1.95-2.25.

-'

I

SLIPS
Lace trimmed, tailored, "Bur
Mil" crepes and taffeta. White,
black, tearose. Sizes to 50.
Originally to $5.95.
$1.98-$2.98-$3.98
Better JEWELRY
Beautiful pins set with import-
ed rhinestones, colored stones.
Values, $7.95 to $14.95.
$2.98-$3.98-$5.00

BLOUSES
Mostly crepes - jewel necks
and tie necks.
at $2.98-$5.00
HAN DBAGS
Fine leather - black, brown,
navy colors-all sizes, shapes.
Originally to $14.95.
$3.98-$5.00-$7.00
CASHMERE
Sweaters-pullovers and cardi-
gans-lovely pastel shades.
$7.95 and $10.00
FABRIC GLOVES
Black, brown, navy and colors.
Originally to $2.00.
69c and 98c

I

SKIRTS
Solid wools and plaids.
$7.95 to $10.95.

Were

at $3.98-$5.00
BETTER GLOVES
Pigskins and capeskins. Orig-
inally to $8.95.
Now $1.98 - $2.98
SWEATERS
$1.98 -$3998

TODAY
the second
BLOODY
PULP
by

BLOUSES
$1.98 -$2.98
GIRDLES
$1.98 -$2.98

EARRINGS
69c and 98c

El _ ._

11

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