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March 29, 1949 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAQE m

Assembly Board Posts Open
To Junior, Senior Women

WAA Leaders

To Di

SENIORS
TheOff11iail Unive ,rsity

1111

scuss

EDITOR'S NOTE: Tbis is the first
of a series of articles discussing the
duties of members of the Executive
Board of Assembly Association.
By LEE KALTENBACH
Petitioning is now open for po-
sitions on Assembly Association
Executive Board of 1949-1950.
Posts open to junior and senior
women include president, vice-
president, secretary, tre asurer,
personnel chairman, social chair-
man and project chairman.
The president, a senior, repre-
sents the Assembly Association at
all meetings of the Michigan
League Undergraduate Council
and at various other meetings at
which the independent women on
campus are to be represented.
SHE ALSO presides at weekly
meetingq of all dormitory presi-
dents and coordinates all Assem-
bly Association activities.
Assembly vice-president at-
tends all meetings of the Michi-
gan League Undergraduate
Council as a non-voting mem-
ber and presides at the weekly
Newly appointed. chairmen of
Frosh Weekend will meet today
in the League. The room num'
ber will be posted.

meetings of league house presi-
dents.
The vice-president, who must
also be a senior, is in charge of ac-
tivities sponsored especially for
coeds living in league houses,
such as the Christmas caroling
party and Saturday afternoon
mixers.a
THE SECRETARY'S duties in-
clude taking minutes of meetings
of the Executive Board of Assem-
bly Association and of the League
House Presidents' Council.
She is in charge of all the files
of the Assembly Association and
keeps the Assembly scrap book up
to date.
The secretary, a junior or senior,
takes care of all correspondence
pertaining to the Assembly Asso-
ciation and is responsible for mak-
ing out and turning in eligibility
lists required by the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs.
Petitions are due at 5 p.m. Wed-
nesday, Aril 13, in the Under-
graduate Office of the League.
Extra Cloth.
Extra bits of Gressmaking:cloth
can be used advantageously by
making them into glass cases to
suit every occasion.

HouseSports
House At hlet ic Managers will
attend the monthly WAA Intra-
mural managers meeting at 5 p.m.
tomorrow in the WAB to state
softball preferences and discuss
spring season sports.
Each manager must submit a list
of the number of teams they are
entering and as many individual
time preferences for each team as
possible. Two time preferences are
the minimum. Each preference
must be a time when all team
members are able to play.
MANAGERS ARE also request-
ed to hand in the number, names
and year of all members of their,
respective houses who are exempt-
ed from participation.
Sports clubs, which will or-
ganize after spring vacation,
will also be explained. The club
managers will briefly outline
tentative plans and meeting
dates.
Lantern. the annual song fest
and. WAA honors night, will be ds
d-cussed and some of the traditions
of past lantern nights will be told.
THE ATHLETIC managers, this
year, will co-operate with WAA
Board members in offering criti-
cisms on this year's athletics for
women and making suggestions
for meeting these problems next
year.
The functions of the new coach-
ing and officiating club will also be
explained. This club has been set
up to equip people from each house
with coaching methods so that
they in turn may help their teams
learn rules.

of Michigan Ring
PLAIN SIGNET ANDI) STXNF SET STY L ES
ENlAII)IrA TEI DELIER Y
Fraternity and sorority coat of arms or Greek letters
encrusted by special order only. Your initials and last
name beautifully engraved with our compliments.
Try one on in your sire today. There is no obligation,
and a very smill deposit will reserve yours until you
want it. Illustrations and prices available without
cost for mailing home.
L.- G. BA]LFOUR CO.

I"

Daily-Howe
CHEERFUL KITCHEN--Mrs. John Green's gay kitchen is the result of yards of green cotton ma-
terial, enamel, the mugs which were an anniversary gift, and the family silver. The Greens and
their infant daughter, Robin, live in a one bedroom furnished apartment at 1547 Sudbury Court.
* * *
Ingenuity With Needle, Thread, Hammer, Saw
Brings Comfort to Willow Village Apartments

Ill

K

1319 South University Phone 9533
By Appoini imenit--I)signr ers and Man ifacturvrs
of tf/h Oficial Ahic'hi,,ai. ig___

-1I

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I

1204 South University
. . .serving :
BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS
SANDWICHES andS
from
7:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. and 5:0
Closed Sunday
t~ u

There are two methods of mak-
ing a Willow Village kitchen at-
tractive, the sewing machine or
the hammer and saw techniques.
John and Alyson Green chose
the former. They sewed curtains
Y Avenue to cover the open shelves below the
sink and attractively decorated
. .the upper shelves, leaving them
and DINNERS uncovered. To give a working space
that the kitchens lack entirely,
SALADS John extended the sink top sev-
cral feet.
Some housewives, using the cur-
tain idea, have hung matching
0 P.M. to 7:00 P.M. drapes on the upper shelves. Oth-
lers have taken window shades,
y decorated them with decals and
used them to cover the open area.

ANOTHER POPULAR solution
is the building of doors. They may
be made of plywood or beaver-a
board. A less expensive venture is
the use of wood frames with card-
board panels. These prove very
satisfactory if there is no junior
member of the family who uses
kitchen equipment for a tricycle
battering ram.
Gone are the days when the
coal range and heater had to be
used. Now residents may install
oil or gas equipment for heat-
ing. Water heaters permitted by
the management include kero-
sene or gas side arm heaters, oil-
burning-units in the cook stoves
or electric immersion elements.
Many residents cook with a
roaster and hot plate; the only al-
ternatives being a bottle gas range
or the coal stove.
Families who can date their Vil-

lage residence prior to early 1947
remember that an appearance of a
government car in the neighbor-
hood meant that electrical appli-
ances had to be hidden.
A POPULAR STORY, that may
now be printed because the family
moved to another community, con-
cerns the student wife who saw a
government car in front of her
apartment. With haste she hid the
hot roaster under the bod. Survey-
ing the situation after the man-
agemen trepresentative's depart-
ure she found one sc orc h e d
mattress plus several slats.
Villagers are often asked by
well-meaning friends "How can
you stand to live out there"? In
most cases this query comes from
someone who has never had the
opportunity to visit the apart-
ments and see how attractive and
homelike they can be.

J acok~ionXL

,
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t
i
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,}
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t

Ma.rch Clecwcnce
SPECIAL OFFERINGS AT
REALLY WORTHWHILE SAVINGS

SPRING COATS
with ZIP-IN LININGS

ByICJJ.I.Ji)DNA! I)SON
MRS. MELVIN MAY and Mrs. Chairles Pierec head the planning
committee for the fashion and hobby show at 'today's meeting of Stu-
dent Wives Club.
Mrs. Ed McCallig is il charge of music for the affair at Uiver-
sity Community Center at 8 p.m.
Twelve club members will model suits, dresses, coats, housecoats,
formals and sweaters tailored by themeselves. They are Mrs. William
Tompkins, Mrs. Lyston Jaco, Mrs. Joseph Paul, Mrs. Melvin May, Mrs.
Hugh Muir, Mrs. Howard Ebersole, Mrs. William Caton, Mrs. Thomas
Quillan, Mrs. Vincent Early, Mrs. Kenneth Donaldson, Mrs. Melbern
Biddulph and Mrs. Donald McKinnon.
Narrator will be Mrs. Donald Patterson. Mrs. Early heads the
hostess committee. Serving with her are Mrs. Charles Hardy, Mrs.
Kenneth Hungerford, Mrs. Robert W. Steele and Mrs. Orrie Vandc
Visse.

Rummage Sale
First collection of clothying
for the Panhellenic Association
rummage sale will be made at
all sororities today by the
house representative. Clothing
will be taken to the Undergrad-
uate Office of the League from
1:30 to 5 p.m. Men's clothing,
as well as women's will be ac-
cepted.
9 -
TELECHRON ALARM
WOODEN CASE $7.95
HALLERS
JEWELERS
717 North University
Near Hill Auditorium

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j$ \
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Z r
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r
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C.:

NOW

$5995

An excellent selection in Spring
Sizes 10, 11, 12, 14, 16, 18,
Formerly to 85.00

colors.
20.

DRESSES
by BRITANY CLUB
NOW $25
One and two-piece knits. White and pas-
tel shades. Sizes 10 to 20.
Formerly to $35.00

LYLE & SCOTT
IMPORTED
SHETLAN D
SWEATERS
95
lhis is an exceptional oppor-
unity! The first time in
years that we've been able to
orier imported sweaters at a
reduced price. Group i-
clUdes pullovers and cardi_
gaihs in white and pastels.
Sizes 36 to 40.
were $10.95 to $12.95

Al

*

.MRS. FRANK MYERS, chahinan of the Easter party sponsired by
the Club and Co-operative Nursery April 11, announces that all moth-
ers planning to attend with their children must sign up at the Tuesday
meeting.

hm

---- - -----

SELECT GROUP $1
Rayon Gabardines, Crepes, Taffetas .
suitable for Casual or dressy wear.
few formals included in this group.

A

Sprint Vacation- Bound?

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SBLUE
* ROSE
* AQUA
* GREY
* GREEN
* BROWN
SMAIZ

SELECT GROUP $5
A select group of better dresses. Being
cleared regardless of former price.
KID GLOVES

NYLONS

NOW

$2 95

NOW

$100

You may sit

all the

way

GO everywhere
this Spring
in our classic
and brilliant

t

Black and Navy Glace Kid with white
stitched trimming.
Formerly to $5.00

Will De Laine and Puffin Nylons.
every size in every color.
Formerly to $2.25

Not

lI 01 U ,1)1 Intl di l Sit Ill.
pair1 of the-se p00Cl lookiing
SC~ll1-~Fdl'I r (ordtdl
\r 4 4-is

SELECTED GROUPS OF

DICK IES
LI PSTICKS
PERFUME STICK
SCARFS
Wool Jersey Bousces

P2
PRICE

BILLFOLDS
J EWE LRY
PAJAMA SETS
FORMAL WRAPS

CORDUROY CASUAL SUIT
Fine wale corduroy suit, blooming in Spring shades
that are as fresh as a crocus. Tailored with crafts-
manship far beyond its earthbound price, and such
a clever suit-of-all-occassions you'll wear its classic
lines everywhere. Sizes 10 to 20.
Junior sizes 9 to 15.
10.95

F0I1f~" #lla ~llogifttiae in115pair tNJLJS1

11

T\kAW ln QAI ITIP' I 1( I IIT(, (-

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