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March 13, 1949 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-13

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PAGE S i7%

I I'A L I I A 11, y

--- -- --- - - , , i 1 1
,S L' N 0."11, A I.A.Itt'l t I;

. .A G..........i....... ..... ..... ....IA-- - ---- - - -----------1940 --

Bs
ULL ESSION
by b. s. brown, sports editor

WITTH THE EXCEPTION of football and hockey, Michigan sports
teamts have had a rough year in compjarison to pastsasn
And Dick Wakefield, ex-Micohigan baseball star, didn't add to the
glory of Ann Arbor town when he camne up with two hoots in yester-
day's exhibition game between the Detroit Tigers and the Philadel-
phia Phillies ... I wonder how Dick's boxer - the one he acquired
from President Ruthven -- likes the Florida sunshine????
Dick is one of' the lads Red Rolfe is counting on. to bring
the American League pennant to the Motor City ... Red is opti-
mnistic about the coming seasons, but so are Casey Stengel, Connie
Mack, Lou Boudreau and Joe McCarthy ... And if last ;year's per-
formances have any bearing on the outcome'of the 1949 race,
Red will sooni wish he were back at the hot sack for the Brtonx
Rombers.
GLENN DAVIS, ARMY'S "Mr. Outside," reports that he would
be happy to coach at West Point. There has been no official word on
Davis' Army future, but Red Blaik, head grid mentor at the Hudson
River service school, has indicated that Davis would be a welcome
addition to Army's coaching staff .. . Davis is at Fort .Dix, New Jersey,
where he will play for the Far East (Korea) Command cage team in
the All-Army basketball tournament, beginning tomorrow.
Branch McCracken was cornered by an avid follower of the
Indiana basketball team recently and the following conversation
ensued between the Hoosier cage coach and the fan:
"Why lid they call a technical foul on Indiana in the game
last night?"
"Indiana had too many meni on the floor," McCracken replied.
"Oh, is that right--who was the sixth man?"
"Me~" said Branch, with a'slight blush.
AFTER FOLLOWING MICHIGAN'S hockey team through to the
first national championship provided for by the National Collegiate
Athletic Association last year, I can't help but wonder how the Wol-
verines will'farc next week when they make their title (defense out at
Colorado Springs, Coo.
The difference between last year's aggregation and the present
club is phenomenal. Michigan's passing in the last five or six
games has been a thing of beauty and the defense, in spite of the
loss of Ross Smith, has been just about unbeatable,
Goalie Jack McDonald has been having quite a. time for himself
in the nets. Some of the saves hie cameetup with in the latter part
of the season were unbelievable. With the experience coach Vic
Heyliger has given to this team, it seems hard to believe that the
'Wolverines will not breeze to their second national crown by next
Saturday night.
The sports publicity director at Colorado College informs mne
that Michigan is again favored this year. Host to the four teams
--Boston College, Dartmouth, Colorado College and Michigan-
the Broadmoor Hotel last year provided limosine service from
the Springs railroad station to the hotel. One of the chauffers
told a few members of the Michigan team, "Well, I guess you're
i. I took the Dartmouth boys up to the hotel yesterday and they
all but conceded. They seemed pretty dejected; I guess because
they lost to Toronto on the way out here." (Michigan had beaten
and tied the Canadians in two earlier games.)
The chauffer went on to say that he had bet ten dollars on
thck utcome ofv the, tourney with a fellow driver. He was a happy
mean when lie drove the victorious Wolverines to the airport the
morning after the crov n was presented to Michigan's 19483 captain,
Connie Hill. Waving a ten spot, at the boys, he yelled. "See you next
year and thanks!~"

Michigyan Dity
Confer'ence Scribes
Pick gluepy, IIUITisolEI
Wolver incerager Bob flu rison,
who made the AP' All-Conferene
team last week, was relegated to
the second squad by the Big Nine
sports writers in their poll of the
league's best.
Along with Bob on the second
string was teammate, Mack S-
prunowity. Both reeived 2 first
feldi. of Wistotsin lodthe 1poll
witht 4:3 ointsand 18 it 't ol
Bible '9 first la ce .,clct 10r1.
Rounding out the first. team
with the flashy Badger center
was Meyer "Whitey" Skoog of1
Minnesota, 41 points; IBik
Sehnittker of Ohio State, 39)
points; 11111 Erickson o Illinois
39 points; and Bowie W~iliams
of Purdue, 37 points.
With the exception of the sub-1
stitution of Will iams for IlarrisOD
the first teai. coincided wIit th
Associated Press sqi t .
DIKE ErlDlUAiMAN, second team
All-American cioice. missed Ithe
first tearn by 41 points, ending up
with a total of :13 ,enid3 votes for
the top five.
Big Jim M8 eltyre of Mline-
rota and Bob Raidiger of Ohio
grabbed the other Lpositils Or
the second squiad s the N did litt
the,;Al' cage seletions.
Six players were ,riven h oror-
able mention. They were Pete El-
liott of the Wolverines, Berberian
of Purdue, Grant of Minnesota,
Regelis of Northwestern, Oster-
korn of Illinois ;and Craret of
Ohio State.
The nominees were :awarded
points on a 5-3-1 basis. All tt,h
editors of Ikre :li;; Nine college,
newspapers partijmted ini thle
poll.
Leag"*1e
Baseball
fly The Associted Press
CLEARWATER, Fla.-The De-
troit Tigers kicked in three runs
with five errors, in their Grape-
fruit League exhibition game open-
er yesterday, and lost a 5 to 3d-
de cision to the Philadelphia Phillis.
An overflow crowd of :3,740 fans
a record for Clearwater, saw the
Phils beat the Tigers for the first
time in two years in the South.
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -
George ,Stirnweiss doubled to
break a tie score in the eighth
inning and the New York Yank-
ees shoved across six more runs
in the ninth yesterday to defeat
the St. Louis Cardinals, 10-3.
SARASOTA, Fla. - Cincinnati's
National League Reds helped in-
augurate baseball's preseason ex-
hibitions yesterday by humbling
the American League's highly r-
garded Red Sox 5-3 in ten innings.
WEST 'PAlM I WACI, a-
The Philadephiia At hletics holm
ped 4o11. al calvet fo' four
ru~ns in a third inning uprising
;yesterday and went on to
trounce the W4iashington Sena -
tors 7-1 in the opening sing

training exhibition gAme for
both ctlbs.
MIAI>, Fla.--Thle largest base'-
ball crowd in Miami's history, 7,-
118 fans, yesterday saw the Brook-
lyn Dodgers set back the Nation-
al League's championi Boston
Braves 5-2 in one of the opening-
games of the Citrus circuit.
Jackie Robinson clouted Johnny
Antonelli's first pitch for a 400-
foot home rein. Additional four
base blows were walloped by Tom'
Brown and Rloy Campanella. to
help provide the I>odgers Hiohir
winning margin.

(t11)I'r()lI'S NOTE: This is the first
cat thlr ee a rticle s o n th e te a m s 0v t tht e o t co i g N A t
tt-rnament. Ftutre stories will deal
%. t fi, Dartmouth and..t Colorado ('ol-
With one of the best. teams in
recent years, Boston College may
be the one to take Michigan's Na-
tional Collegiate hockey crown
should the Wolverines fall by the
wayside.
The Eagles face Colorado Col-
loge Friday night and will be fa-
vored to move into the finals
against the Michigan-Dartmouth
winner,
O)NLY a 4-2 1.088 Sat the hand cs
of the Datm~outh six mars the
oth erwise unblemished record of
B.C. New England laeague champs
for the second, straight season,
they have won 17 games, includ-
ing a 7-4 revenge victory over the
Indians, to rank on a par with
t lie once beaten Michigan sextet.
Roston has a balanced outfit
with a scoring p)unch that is
{hard. to stop. In their 18 games
this season, the Eagles have av-

craged almost eight goals a
game against the best the east
has to offer.
Dulring the course of the yvear,
they beat M.I.T. 122-5 and 1 1-5,
1)exes 22-1 and A.I.C. 10}-'', witht
other decisions o ver Brown, l lar'-'
yard, Yale, Colorado, Pinceton
and their cross city rival, lRoston
University.
THE EAGLES' defensive rec-
ord is almost as good as the of-
fensive mark. With two of the best
d]efensemen in eastern circles and
ace goalie Bernie Burke. Boston's
defense has prove(] a IowT~h nt to
crtack.
Burke was utined firs(t tam
goalie on the All NCA:A tour -
na meat team last year, and with
another season of experience
behind him, should be better
thon defensemen, coach John
K~elley has a couple of bruisers
than can make the lives of on-,
rutshing forwards very miserable.
LEADING THlE DlFENSE is Ed

Song~in, pack~ing 200-pounds o
trouble. He made the All-Nem
England teakm as a freshman an
this sea sonrtanoked sixth on til
Ealsscoringlist withItnine goal
,ltid 17 assists.
At the other defense post is
Jack Gallagher, who can be
used hoth as a forward and in
his usual rear post.
Three veterans of last year'.
tournam ent, Jack M cIntyre, W arrn L w s a d J m F t te l
make up the Eagles first Uri
These men, along with Harry MWl
horn. Connie Harrington and C:
Ceg"lar.ski g'ive' Boston its scoriln
I thrust.
Mt~lrER ISc urr-ently leadini
the team with 32 goals and 2
assists, with Lewis, Uarringtom
McIntyre anld Ceglarski roundini
out the first .five, each with :1
p)oints or better.
Kelley, in his twelfth year
cotiching in the Boston school, ha
heis best season aind boosted hi
overall record to 114 victories a
against only 44 def ea ts.

HIGHi FLYING EASTERNERS:
Enele; Pose Threattlo 1M Puck. Crown

Daily--Ohl~nger
AND 'nIl: WINNAIS-lt's a lesson in boxing by Hlal Mat-tell,
whose left jab is blocked by Jim Kanvilloto. Instrucetor' Lee Setorner
looks( over a sparrinig session betweeni two of Ltst night's -winners.

In -V 10tl I"iIoingltrrIey IPoetors Say
Al-Camnpus Boxing pu1ily~ ]Yt tits astiff defense i and- H fliig0v'

VAN HE11USEN sHii]rrs
Thce most populair white shirts on the C~ampus
VAN HEUNWu SPAS.Ofr
cloth or broadcloth with barrel or French cuffs.

foare ani en I-1-tsius t ic ga.theri rij of
fight, . tis
thea rcet. seven punilch ers had ea rly -
edti 1 i right to compete in the!
finals on Marci 23rd in the same
ring. Four others will have to
meet :semi-final foes later this
week.
IT WAS A nyaj.:or victory for thleF1
mtatch makers its every fight tea-f
t tred a close decision withImthe k
txcept i ohoa Ltechnical knockout
of Ch uck Clarke by h ard hitting;
,Jim. tanetiioto in the secondI
101111( of their lightweight clatsh1. i
Biut the best exhibition of'
boixing came in a 155 p)ound
bout in which red-headed Jim
Shelton won a bitterly contest-
ed1 decision over Morgan Ram-
sey. Both boys provided explo-
sive action in every round with
furious exchanges of hardj
punches.
Shelton piled up onough pointsj,
1o win by persistently driving hard
lefts to the face of i s opponent.
Ramsei(y was toll eing, fi lie'bbell I
((ede the bout.
T.lW) IGHIl T eavyweighcts, Ron
Soble and Jm. Brown, fought
their way to the closest decisionI
of the night with Soble getting
a one point nod. At one stage in
the secondi round, Brown fired a
fusillade of lefts and rights to
the jaw of the winner but was too
tired (,o press his 5 <Idvalttgets 8
l#i a wild nliddlewei.0it clasli
Mal Martelle raneiinto some 1111-

ced some tellinj loews ',before IKEAN.F. !P-Ha-
bowtitii t' AKLN, Iad
souie ArtIloutI etian, Itle Dkitroit
Aot her Le'sve1aIxl etliI)on !Tdigers' big right hand pitcsher
Hlawley and Doni Ileikelinen pro- whose skull was fractured .in a
vided some fireworks in their wVel- serious traffic crash Thursday
terweight encounter', with Hawley night, was "about the same" to-
winning on points. The former day and doctors grew optimistic
University of hawaii star took! over his condition.
some punishment from Heiken- He spent a fair night and was
hen's right, hand before1)111t Plig. conscious this morning when hie
his own t o work. was visited in Morrell Memorial
Hospital by his mother, Mrs. A. .1
IN *l'ic O'1'hl lt wtlter w(eigt liouttentam of Detroit. She flew
inatchx, Yon Muyashu 1ir'o outsluggetd here yesterday t~o be a.t. his bed-
Walt Wiener to ,iz asplit: d(,ci- side.
Sion. Ealchl fibghte r shook the Dr. Edgar T. Watson, who has
other vwith dlamaging blows and been treating the Tiger pitcher,
one judge called it a draw. said Houtteman was much im-
Amog te 'nhxr i Ixt, Dck proved yesterday rand was "hold-
Ani" ong'the lsteights.ovickz ing his owen"today.
Petidlieswondloe onge. over His pulse was normal, as was
1'et Anehies ad Gorg K0 his blood pressure, indicating that
zian beat MV1illard Seta. Kudner. no unforeseen troubles will de-
-was especially effective in tying velop internally, Dr. Watson said.
his opponent xxp Three Lakeland companions
Jim Izum i and George Chang who were hurt when Art's con-
won their 128 pound tests over vertible roadster collided with 'a
Grant Parker and Bill YudkinI large citrus truck were described
r'espectively and will meet in theI as only "fair."
finals. Frank Sullr,ianalso qduali--
find by defeat in !!(b A.)I a lreik in
the only 16(5 lpound bouit . -

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Pciuisyh'afnia Sta te Colle ge
changed football coaches yester
day wit hout any of' the fuss and
fturoi'e th at usually accomipanies!
Robert A. Higgins, Penn tatfte'sI
head coach for the past 19 years.
resig nedetid F'. Joseph Bedenk.
his lon-tiinie assistant, was namedt
his successor.
fligtins, whIose I icaitha has not
been good for the past year or so,
had consideredi dropping out ofj
coaching for 'some time, but lie
didl not submit a written r esi gna-I
tion until March ll. It, was acecepted
today by acting piesident ,James,
Milhiollandfc, Nwho promlotec d -
ellk.

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