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March 09, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I~l !), 19q4Q

THE MIHIGAcx"tN DAILY-

ONE OF M'S GREATEST COMBINATIONS HEARS FINAL WHI STLFZ
Harrison, Elliott Finish Long Wolverine Basketba

ll Careers

By PRES HOLMES
One of the greatest basketball combinations in Michigan's history
worked together for the last time Monday night in Yost Field House.
Playing together for the Wolverines for four years-three of them
as an incomparable guard combination- Bob Harrison and Pete El-
liott bowed out of the Michigan basketball picture in what they both
consider a great game and the cne they'll always remember.
THE COMBINATION of Harrison and Elliott has become as much
of a byword to Wolverine fans as Harmon and Evashevski or Ross and
Bobe Hume.
It seems almost impossible to mention on without the other,
and for a good reason too. These two Wolverine cagers have
been doing things together since 1945.
In that year they became the first two freshmen ever to play bas-
ketball for Michigan. Later they joined the same fraternity, and last
year they climaxed the association by both being named to the first
team of the All-Conference squad.
BACK IN '45 Harri was a sparkplug on the Michigan quintet
under the tutelage of Bennie Ocsterbaan, while Pete held down the
guard position.
When Ozzie Cowles took over the reins of the Maize and Blue
cage squad in the fall of 1946 he converted Harrison to guard, and
started one of Michigan's greatest defensive units.
The two are an almost ideal combination. Harrison generally
supplies the offensive punch, and has led the Wolverines in overall

scoring the last two years. Elliott is regarded as the best defensive'
player in the league, and is assigned the task of halting the opposi-
tion's ace almost every game. Asked who the toughest player he was
ever forced to guard he diplomatically replied, "Suprunowicz, in prac-
tice."
PETE COMES FROM a strictly athletically minded family. His
dad played football, basketball, and baseball in college, had a stretch
in professional baseball, and was a member of the Illinois Athletic
Club when they were national champions in basketball. He was head
cage coach at Northwestern and then head football coach at his
alma mater. Illinois Wesleyan, before retiring to set up his medical
practice.
Pete has proved as versatile as his dad having played four
seasons of both football and basketball, and three of golf. He in-
tends to play golf again this spring and if so will become Michi-
gan's first 12-letter man.
It was recently announced that he had been named on the All-
Opponent team by a group of San Francisco experts. This is one of his
greatest memories, but last year was really "it" according to him.
When it was announced that the cagers would play in Madison Squarc
Garden he exclaimed. "From the Rose Bowl to the Garden in three
months. It's great."
! HARRISON'S ATHLETIC exploits have been concentrated solely
on basketball, and he has proved his worth. The fact that he was cap-

tarn of the squad in his sophomore year, and has been first team Big
Nine for the last two seasons demonstrates this supposition.
Famous for his one-hand set shot from his guard position,
hlarri attributes his introduction to this shot to Cowles while he
was still a coach at Dartmouth. Cowles' quintet played in Bob's
hometown, Toledo, 0., and a lad named Monroe who was All-
American that year made frequent use of this shot.
Harri tried it in his high school practice session the next day and
it fit like a glove.
IT WAS A GREAT THRILL for Bob to play in the Garden last
year and it appears as if he is going to make it again this season. He
was informed last week that he had been chosen to play in the All
Star game there the first week in April.
Another fact about the two cagers is that neither one has ever
been injured seriously enough to prevent participation in the next
game, and it looks like it's going to take graduation to keep them
from being out on the floor for the Maize and Blue again next year.,
It sure would be great to have 'em back again.

ROB HARRISON
. . . sinks 'emr

Starrak Valuable Factor
n'l Hockey Defense

I

PETE ELLIOTT
... stops 'em

TALKING SHOP
with Bud Weidenthal
Associate S/orts Editor
DESPITE THE POOR showing of Michigan's Wolverines, the West-
ern Conference track and field championships at Champaign was
an outstanding affair both for its fine performance and its sur-
prises...
The boys from Lake Mendota way, came out from hiding in Madi-
son to provide the biggest track surprise of the year in these parts.'.
No one had given the Badgers much of a chance to cope with the tre-
mendous strength of Ohio State . . . but the Red and White proved
that track can be just as unpredictable as the rest of 'em and turned
out to be the cinderella team of the meeting.
EVERY MAN on the Wisconsin team reached his peak that
night . . . it was one of the finest clutch performances in Conference
track history . . . they couldn't possibly have done better.
Ohio would have become sole possessor of the title, despite the
Badgers, had Larry Snyder decided to run Mal Whitfield in the
half instead of scratching him at the coaches meeting ... or had
Dick Maxwell's ailing foot held up for the finals ... he was a sure
bet for points in both the low and high hurdles.
Wisconsin was responsible for two of the three Conference rec-
ords set at Champaign. . . Gehrmann's 1:53.1 lowered Herb Barten'sI
mark by eight-tenths of a second, which was not unexpected-he
breezed in without being pushed ... but the new mark in the mile
relay confounded everyone. The Badgers weren't even expected to
win the thing ... a great leg by Gehrmann was the deciding 'factor.
MICHIGAN'S DISAPPOINTING performance should have been an-
ticipated on Friday night. While headlines were screaming that
,the Wolverines were leading the Big Nine in qualifiers, it was apparent
to coach Canham that the Maize and Blue would be running out of
the money in the final tally...
Five of the nine qualifiers were in the hurdles, always a doubt-
ful quantity... Barten's injured foot was badly swollen and it was
doubtful whether he could compete in the finals at all.
Art Henrie, who qualified in.the 60 yard dash, had to be scratched
from the finals because of a leg injury and Bob Thomasson had been
badly bruised in a fall in the 880 prelims. With these men on the
doubtful list the outlook could be anything but bright.,.
AS IT WAS, the hurdlers performed brilliantly and gathered 11
of the Wolverine's 13%i/2 points. . . Jim Mitchell was alone responsible
for eight markers and was the outstanding member of his team.
But with Rod Warren disqualified in the quarter after placing
fifth and Ron Soble pulling up lame in the mile-relay the men in
Maize and Blue could do no better than seventh...
Competition in the field events was the stiffest ever . . . it was
the first time in Conference history that 50 feet has failed to place in
the shot-put ... and the first time that 13 feet could not get a point in
the pole vault.
The most astounding thing about the whole affair is the fact
that Co-Champion Wisconsin could not win a duel meet from most
of the top seven teams, while seventh place Michigan could be almost
assured of a win over any of them.
Xei4u e- Titne £jeci4

Lamer, Martin Sue Baseball

NEW YORK--(P) - Max Lanier
and Fred Martin, who once pitched
for the St. Louis Cardinals, sued
organized baseball for damages
totaling $2,500,000 yesterday, in
an attempt to break the five-year
suspensions impoF, 1 on them for
jumping tothe h xican League.
They also obtained a federal
court order directing organized
Ramblers Cop
1-H PucekTitle
I-M hockey returned to the
Michigan campus for the first
time in several seasons this year,
and the Ramblers copped the
league championship with eight
wins and two ties.
The Rambler sextet sewed up
the title in the six team league
recently when it battled the
Greene House squad to a 4-4 dead-
lock.
The Greene House pucksters'
lone defeat came at the hands
of the Ramblers, and they fin-
ished the campaign in second
place with six wins, one loss, and
one tie. The Independents took
third place with five victories, two
ties, and two defeats.
Members of the first-place team
were Lloyd Hiberd, Roy Baker,
Ward Peterson, Dan Totter, ill
Buckles, Ernie Graham, forwards;
Curt White, Don McClelland, Bob
Cutting, and Fred Jowles, defense;
and Dick Hawkes, goalie.
Stage Coach Inn
offers
Lunch and Supper
Monday thru Friday
for $10 per week
For info call Herb 8064

baseball to show cause on March
15 why it should not be temporar-
ily restrained from barring them
and from demanding that players
sign contracts containing "either
a reserve or a termination clause."
THlE SUIT is similar to one
brought last year by Danny Gar-
della, former New York Giants
outfielder who was banned for
jumping to the Mexican League.
Gardella's case was once dis-
missed by a district court but the
decision was reversed recentl-y by
the Court of Appeals which ruled
that the trial could be held.
The reserve clause, focal point
in both suits, is a portion of all
professional baseball contracts
which binds a player to one
club for life unless he is sold,
traded or released.
It was attacked as a violation of
the anti-trust laws in the suits
filed in Federal Court here by
John L. Flynn, New York Attor-
ney.
*, * *
NEW YORK - (/P)-Joe Louis
was forced to admit defeat in his
first venture here in the promo-
tional field.
Louis said that Eddie Eagan,
chairman of the New York State
Athletic Commission, had re-
jected his request to have the
proposed Ezzard Charles-Jersey
Joe Walcott bout sanctioned
here as for the world's cham-
pionship.
The principal points resulting
from this statement are:
TUXEDO and
TAILS RENTALS
ALL NEW - ALL SIZES
Locally Stocked
See
RABiDEA k-ARRQIS
119 So. Main St. Phone 6924

1-The title fight will have to
be held out of the state, probably
at Chicago
2-Lotlis said lbe definitely
wouldi not figlit again, and if lie
should change his mind he
would not consider himself
champion but a ,challenger. s
3-Louis has no other fighters'
signed up outside of Charles and
Walcott.
The last point stirred most of
the controversy since the 20th
Century Sporting Club also claims
it has Charles signed to :i con-
tract.
..CAMBRIDGE, Mass.-(I'-Har-
vardl football coach Art Valpey
vesterday named as his backfield
assistant Steve Sebo, presently
athletic director and football
coach at Alma, Mich., College.
Sebo, a 1937 alumnus of Mich-
igan where he was a varsity half-
back and baseball catcher for
three years will replace Dave Nel-
son who resigned to become head
coach at University of Maine.
BASKETBALL SCORES
N.Y.U. 65, C.C.N.Y. 52j
Iowa State 49, Kansas 45

Although highly underrated and
often overlooked when the sports-
writers and fans are handing out
accolades, Dick Starrak has proved
to be an essential cog in the
Michigan hockey machine for the
vast four years.
Michigan teams tr iditionll: i
ar rich in celifli and st t L a
and this year's puck sqIald isIm
exception.I
BUT COACHI Vic HeyliYger's?
array missed the services of the
veteran defenseman during the
Minnesota series which lie didn't
make because of a severe arm1
gash received the preceding week.;
T e , n no u i C e Iu en t thit
Dartnouth had been chosen to
Oppose Michigan in the first
game of the NCAA hockeyI
Tournament to be held March
17-19 at Colorado Springs,j
Colo., rounded out the four-
team field which will partici-
pate in the second annual tour-
nament.
The other two squads are
Boston College and Colorado
College, which make the four
teams in this year's playoffs the
same quartet that participated
in the inaugural last year.

The Wolverine defense showed
marked improvement when
Starrak returned to action for
the two games against Michigan
Tech last weekend.
Rated the most improved man
on the team by Coach Heyliger,
S. arrak is relatively new at de-
iise. He switched to this posi-
3on only last year following two
CalIl tigl; as a forward.
'1STANRAK IS SMALL for a de-
enseman weighing only 162
pounds and standing five-feet-
nine, but makes up for this handi-
cap by his speed and natural abil-
ity for playing hockey.I
Dick's work was especially
outstanding in the North Da-
kota and Colorado College con-
tests earlier this season.
The presence of his younger
brother Jim on the Colorado Col-
lege sextet spurred him to greater
heights during that series. He will
probably get another chance to
renew the family rivalry in the
NCAA playoffs.
Sporting a 3.2 scholastic aver-
age, Dick will graduate in June
with a degree in forest manage-
ment. Starrak plans to returnto
school next fall to work on his
masters' degree and hopes to play
in the International Hockey
League during his spare time.

i

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