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March 03, 1949 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'ilL tSI)AY. MARxh Z, I1: v

TIlE MICiIlGAN DAILY

NO LAUGH!NG MAT'TER:
'Ensian i)esioiers Sri ve
SPreclude D e( Look

People won't laugh at the 1949
'Ensian 50 years from now.

shots in the book was debated
J-y the staff, but the black and

Because serious art, styles white seet won out.
change so quickly, and date a
yearbook after a few years, art Accordinig to Todd, "Color
editor Stu Todd decided to keep ,)hotos make the rest of the book
the drawings down to a minimum. icok sick. People tend to over-
He has concentrated in using CioL the other shots.

photographs as his main artistic
medium.
UNDER TILE leadership of
Todd, the art staff is attempting
something revolutionary in the
realm of make-up this year. Stag-
gered section headings, as well as
integrated color techniques will
mark a new step ni layout proce-;
diwes.
The question oF' using color
'Destr Rides
A'ain' To Be
Shown Here
"Destry Rides Again," a movie
of the West, will be presented by
the Art Cinema League at 7 and
9 p.m. Friday and Saturday at
the Architecture Auditorium.
The title role of Destry, the
young sheriff who follows his fa-1
ther's footsteps to restore a wild
western town to law and order isI
played by James Stewart.
I!
Marlene Dietrich plays the fem-
,nine lead, and sings "See What1
the Boys in the Back Room Will
Have."
Tickets will be available at the
Architecture Auditorium before
each performance.

EECAUSE THE basic job of the
art staff is to supervise the corre-
lation of the yearbook, both art
and layout work iall under its jur-
isdiction.
Orders ate still being taken for
ihe book at the Publications Bldg.
1nsian sales manager, Bill Oos-
tc rinan urges all students to take
advantage of the lower price be-
fore March 9. On that date the
price will go up one dollar.
ASCEHld
Mee Tonight

10 lIMS i
Per forrii rot'
'Choral Unionl
Milstein TFPlay
IIere Tomlorrow
Nathan Milstein, violinist, will
I <gve thei ninth concert in the
Choral Union Series at 8:30 p.m.
tomorrow in Hill Auditorium.
IRussian by birth, Milstein has
lived in this country since 1929
and became a citizen over six years
ago.
TOI FRITZ KREISLER, Milstein
is t he greatest of today's younger
generation of violinists. Unlike1
mos3t Russian fiddlers, Milstein
had a wealthy father (a wool im-!
porter ).
Born in Odessa, he was sent
to the Imperial Conservatory at
the age of eleven. The revolu-
tion stopped his violin lessons,
hut he went on a Russian tour
with his lifelong friend, pianist
Yladimir Horowitz.

1 ---.

. _

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IPail I ax
&ud et grueakinavIt4t4
Leoislaltire4
AT THE MEAL-MART
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
LANSING-( )--A bill to r -
vide for capital punishment in 7:00-10:00 A.M.
Michigan after it was approved b4,
the people was defeated 44-51 in
the House yesterday, despite the T hrui The Arcadc oi M ayard4
impact of a sensational double
murder near Grand Rapids.
References in debate today to

I

Student members of the Amer!
can Society of Civil Engineers will Today, at the age of 42, Mil-
present a survey of courses in the stein is considered one of the most
Department of Civil Engineering en.sitive living interpreters of

to professional ASCE members at
their state meeting at 8 p.m. to-
day at the Union.
The student program, entitled
"Stresses, Strains and Perma-
nent Deformations, ar Foir Years
at Michigan" is to be given by one
representative from eahli section
of the department,.
The meeting will be preceded by
a dinner for members of the So-,
ciety and for student civil engi-
n:ers who have been invited at a
reduced price. The discussion is
open to all students without
charge.

FITTED IN THE STORE 61 ;
OR IN YOUR HOME

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Beethoven's and Bach's violin
music, as well as the Tchaikov-
sky and Max Bruch concertos.
BACh'S CHACONNE for violin
alone and Bruch's Concerto in G
minor are among the selections
Milstein will play for tomorrow's
t'oncert.
Tickets for the concert are on
sale now in the niversity Musical
Society's offices, Burton Tower.
They may also be purchased im-
mediately before the concert at
the Hill box office.
Qpera Society
Jiseloses Cast
Of 'Patience'
Tom Wilson, director of Gilbert
and Sullivan Society productions,
has anncunced principal cast se-
lections for "Patience," which will
be the Society's offering for the
current semester.I
The light opera will feature
Carol Neilson in the title role of
Patience; Jim Ueberhorst as Bun-
thorne, the "Fleshly Poet"; Jack
Wilcox as Col. Calverley; Jim Lo-
baugh as Maj. Murgatroyd, and Al
Johnson as the "Idyllic Poet,"
Grosvenor.
OTHER LEADING roles will be
played by Howard Wuerth, as the
Duke of Dunstable; Janet Gilder-
sleeve as Lady Angela; Doris
Kayes as Lady Saphir, Marie
Roth as Lady Ella, and Harriet
Norton as Lady Jane.
Donald Decker, dramatic di-
rector for "Patience," and Don
Razey, assistant musical direc-
tor, aided Wilson in making the
cast selections.
Many of the principal players
are veterans of past Gilbert and
Sullivan productions here on cam-
pus. Among these is Jim Ueber-
horst, who provided laughs as the
jailer in the December production
of "Yeomen of the Guard."
"PATIENCE" is scheduled for
Ipresentation on May 12, 13, and
14, at the Pattengill Auditorium of{
Ann Arbor High School.k
("o p IS Correct
CHICAGO-Whenever you use
the word "cop," you aren't using
slang; it's the initials for "con-
stable on patrol."

RUBBLE USED AS BUILDING MATERIAL-To match the
original building stones used in the 4,000-year-old Temple of
Amon, at Karnak, Egypt, archaeologists are using rubble collected
from the surrounding region in restoration of the Temple.
NEW LITERARY PLAN:
Committee Formed To
Coorditate Curriculum
(EDITOT'S NOTE: This is the last of three articles on the new literary
college curriculum.)
By PAIL DAWSON
As part of the decision to set up the new curriculum requirements,
the faculty of the literary college established a Standing Committee on
Curriculum to coordinat e and study the new plan in operation.
This committee, elected by the faculty and headed by Prof. Karl
Litzenberg of the English department, becones in effect a committee
on undergraduate educational policy
ITS IMMEDIATE TASK is to get the new plan into operation.
The committee is encouraging the various departments to
examine their elementary courses to see if they serve the pur-
poses of the new distribution requirements for general education.
And five major subcommittees, headed by members of the Cur-
riculum Committee and representative, of the faculty at large, are
considering and drafting possible interdepartmental degree programs.
They are working in the divisions of humanities, physical sciences,
biological sciences and social sciences.
THE LONG-RANGE job delegated to the Curriculum Committee
is continuous study of the curriculum in order to make appropriate
recommendations to the faculty on educational problems.
The curriculum revision aims at better general education
and greater freedom for students in choosing fields of concentra-
tion. The Curriculum Committee is the central coordinating
agency for experimental work toward these ends.
Besides Prof. Litzenberg, its members are: Prof. Otto G. Graf of
the German department, Prof. David M. Dennison of the physics de-'
partment, Prof. Alfred H. Stockard of the zoology department, Prof.
Benjamin W. Wheeler of the history department, Prof. Joseph E. Kal-
lenbach of the political science department, and Assistant Dean
Charles H. Peake (ex officio).
IN EXPLAINING the-philosophy behind the revision, Dean Hay-
ward Keniston said it may well "revolutionize our thinking about edu-
cation by provoking a re-examination of everything we're doing in
the college."
Ile said it will not only result in better education for stu-
dents, but will also make it necessary for the faculty to con-
sider and clarify their theory of undergraduate education.
For example, the honors programs peed to be related to the
new plans for interdepartmental specialization. "And while we're
at it, we should reconsider the pyre of honors progr-ns in the whole
college," bean Keniston said.
THE FACULTY have decided to "ensure a common intellectual
experience" of the major discipline through departmental rather
than through general survey courses.
"A survey course is all too likely to be a canned synthesis,"
Dean Keniston said. "The student may not have to do any any
thinking for himself."
Now that research has broken down the old barriers between com-
partments of knowledge, he said, students' specialization must also
be reorganized'so that they can synthesize for themselves what they
learn in various departments of the college.
This is the purpose of the "college programs," as the new interde-
partmen tal concentration programs are called. Departmental boun-
daries should be ignored, if necessary, in planning concentration pro-
grams, Dean Keniston said. "Life doesn't follow departmental cate-
gories; life works on a multiple front."

the lonely hearts" nurder of a
young widow and her baby daug.h-
ter did not swing enough votes to
pass the bill.
AN ATTEMPT to lay the meas-
ure on the table where it would
be eligible for future consideration
was also defeated. House parlia-
mentarians said the same motion
would be in order today.
The requirement for a popular
vote in November, 1950, w s
placed on the measure Tuesday.
Before the vote another amend-
ment was attached to permit
courts to sentence first degree
murderers to not less than 30
years' imprisonment instead of
execution.
This was the 25th unsuccessful
attempt to restore the death pen-
alty for first degree murderers in
Michigan since 1885. The pro-
posal was defeated 23 times in the
legislature, was vetoed by the gov-
ernor in 1929 and defeated by the
people in 1931.
Capital punishment was abol-
ished in the state in 1846.
BEFORE DEBATE was cut off
today by a successfui motion for
an immediate vote, the only ref-
erence 'on the floor to the Kent
County murders was made by Rep.
Eugene C. Betz (Rep., Monroe).
sponsor of the bill. .
He read an Associated Press dis-
patch which said the Attorney
General's Office had asked that
Michigan court proceedings be
delayed to permit an attempt
to extradite the man and women
to extradite the man and woman
In that state they could be ee-
trocuted if convicted of a murder
they are accused of there.
Unionii lans
Jaunt To See
Fay's 'Harvey'
Students wishing to see the De-
troit production of "Harvey,"
starring Frank Fay, may save -
money by joining the Union-spon-
sored theatre trip scheduled for
March 16, Dale Coenen, Union
publicity chairman, announced
$yesterday.
Busses will leave the Union at
7 p.m. Wed., March 16, ieturning
from Detroit immediately after the
play
Women have been granted late
permission for the trip, Coenen
said. "Tickets are limited," he
added, "so we advise buying them I
as soon as possible, since there
has been a great demand for this
excursion."
Combination theatre and bus
tickets will be on sale at the Un-
ion desk today through Monday.
Priced at $3.90, the tickets include
a $3.60 orchestra seat and trans-
portation to and from Detroit.
sEEiea 0~an

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