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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 03, 1949 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHI AN DAITY

PA 8

---- ------

...... ... .

Ulvestad Ranks as Best
Wolverine Pole Vaulter

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the second
in a series of articles on te Western
Conferene track meet to he held at
Illinois, March 4th anid 5t.)
By ROG GOELZ
Ed Ulvested broke two long
standing records at Yost Field
House Saturday night while aid-
ing the Wolverines gain their first
track meet win over Ohio State in
three years.
After two misses, the Wolverine
vaulter cleared the crossbar with
a leap of 13 feet 11 inches and
thereby set a new Yost Field
House record as well as an Ohio
State-Michigan dual meet mark.
THE #FORMER Yost Field
House high mark was set in 1941
by Charles Decker who vaulted 13
feet 10% inches.
Ulvested's jump bettered the
old Buckeye - Wolverine meet
record (13 feet 6 3/8 inches
achieved by Hunn of Michigan
in 1935) by 4 and 5/8's inches.
With the Western Conference
Indoor Track championships com-
Miellef Rates
Sword Sport
Tops inSafety
By CY CLAYTON
"Fencing is a composite sport
having the attributes of basket-
ball, baseball, boxing and even
football without any of the dan-
gers of these sports."
So speaks Ed Millef, Scimitar
Club president. This statement in-
dicates the fencer's view of the
sport which Micllef claims is the
most democratic since physical
size has little relation to ability,
and anyone can participate with
proper instruction.
THIS INSTRUCTION is offered
at Michigan by two agencies. The
Physical Education Department
sponsors fencing classes at Water-
man Gym and the I.M. building
offers instruction for interested
men.
However, both sources failed
to provide the practice necessary
to develop national champion
fencers.
The I.M. building activities are
directed by the Scimitar Club
members who can not offer ade-
quate instruction because of the
necessity of keeping fit for com-
petitive sword play,
Out of about a hundred men
who registered for instruction at
the Sport Building, only about
twenty have continued to take in-
struction.
Micllef claims this is entirely
due to what he terms "inadequate
instruction and outmoded equip-
ment" and not lack of interest.
Patton Ends
Retirenent
LOS ANGELES-(/P)-Sprinter
Mel Patton of the University of
Southern California yesterday an-
nounced the end of a retirement
that was about as brief as one of
his races.
Patton, holder of the world rec-
ord for the 100-yard dash at 9.3
seconds, said he had reconsidered
his decision of last Jan. 17 and
will compete for U.S.C. this spring.

ing up this weekend at Cham-
paign it is interesting to com-
pare the new ie "ord (which is the
best turned in by a Wolverine
vaulter in indoor competition)
against former Big Nine records
and against the one that earned
first place points in last year's
meet.
TOM BENNETT of Wisconsin
and Harry Cooper of Minnesota
tied for first position honors,
clearing the bar at 13 feet 10
inches. Michigan failed to place
in this event.
The Western Conference in-
doorl record belongs to Milton
Padway of Wisconsin, who
vaulted a height of 14 feet 1
and 5/8's inches in a dual meet
in 1939.
As an important event on any
dual track meet, the pole vault has
presented cinder fans with out-
standing athletes among which
Cornelius Warmerdam, William
Sefton and Al Haller can be con-
sidered greats.
WARMERDAM holds both the
indoor and outdoor records for the
United States as well as an of-
ficially recordedsworld'srecord of
15 feet seven and 3/4 inches estab-
lished in 1942 while he was serv-
ing in the armed forces.j
The American college record
is held by William Sefton of
Southern California who clear-
ed 14 feet 11 inches in 1937.
Haller holds the highest Con-
ference vault (indoors and out-
doors) with a jump of 14 feet 4
inches established in a dual meet
between Ohio State and Wiscon-
sin.
Dort Reldc1dc
Cops Scorng
C.'
Chamnpionship
CHICAGO -(/P)-Wisconsin's
Don Rehfeldt, 6 foot 6 inch center,
has clinched the 1949 Western
Conference basketball individual
scoring championship. He becomes
the sixth player in Conference
"modern era" history to score
more than 200 points during a
12-game schedule.
Rehfeldt scored 13 field goals
and eight free throws against
Iowa Monday night for 34 points
to boost his 11-game total to 213
with one game left against Minne-
sota at Madison this Saturday.
These are the Big Nine players
who have surpassed 200 points
during a 12-game Conference
schedule:
272-Wier, Iowa, 1948.
255-Phillip Il.. 1943.
215-Mclntyre, Minn., 1948.
208-Ives, Iowa, 1944.
204-Schnittker, OSU, 1948.
With 213 points, Rehfeldt needs
only three points against Minne-
sota Saturday to become the third
highest scorer in "modern era."
Office and Portable Models
of all makes -
Sold,..
Bought,
Repaired,
Rented
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
G. I. Requisitions Accepted
O. D. MORRILL
314 South State St.

RAt- t CCvIE' -
\A41 e4W! t
l i ccGzo vec iZ7 c ' '
R(R
I -..-y,
A N,4ewirs .J
Sailors To Law lch Activities
At Whitmore Lake Next Week

Ivy League
SquadMeet
By HERB RUSKIN
It'll be the old Ivy League
against the Big Nine in the open-
ing game of the NCAA hockey
tournament scheduled for March
17 in Colorado Springs.
In the drawing, Michigan was
pitted against either Dartmouth
or Harvard, depending on which
wins their clash on March 12. In,
the other pairing. Colorado Col-
lege will face an improved Boston
College sextet on Friday, March 18.
IF THE WOLVERINES win
their opening game, they will have
the advantage of a day's rest be-
fore entering the final on Satur-
day night.r
Last year, Michigan defeated
Boston College, 6-4, in over-,
tune in the Friday night game
and then had to come back
the next night to face D~art-
mouth.
Saturday afternoon, the losers
of the first two games will meet,
in the consolation match to decide
third place in the tournament.
THIS SEASON, the Wolverines!
have met only one of the teams
that they are likely to face out in
Colorado. During the Christmas
vacation, they defeated Colorado
College, 3-2, and tied them, 4-4,
in another game.
However important the NC'AA
tourney may be, the immediate
problem facing Michigan coach
Vic Heyliger is Michigan Tech
which comes to Ann Arbor this
weekend for a pair of games.
The Huskies are the only ones
to beat Michigan this season, de-
feating them, 6-2, between semes-
ters up in Houghton.
GOOD NEWS for the Wolvt'r-
ines appeared in the person of
captain Al Renfrew who rejoined
the team after missing both of
last week's games. Renfrew did
not see action against Minnesota
because of a stomach ailment that
put him in Health Service.
Despite Renfrew's return, the
Maize and Blue sextet will not
be at full strength against Tech,
for defenseman Dick Starrak
will still be out because of his
arm injury.
If it were- necessary, Starrak
might play against Michigan Tech,
but Heyliger decided that lae
would give his arm a rest and save
him for the NCAA.

i'atiei c To Compete in Big Nine Tussle

U' Ciff ' I rS lI ~flWidiotl-tln'cE, out of thew nine ret urning
ly uiucv :f\ et Ii ii: clb left cor
SiS 1 rinle to compete for the rown lokl1ers, Purdue may have
PiS Nine Clampionships being the necessary depth in malerial to
ield this Friday and Saturday at garner enougil po nts for top po-1
Bloomington. Ind. sition.
Althougi there are only eight
weight classes, this year's meet TOMORROW THE preliminar-
will feature nine conference ies will be run off while Saturday
champs competing for the crowns. provides the deciding matches
Since the 1948 season added two with the scheduling of semi-finals.
wei'~hts, 121 and 191, for purposes
of Olympic competition, there
were ten weiaht championships
claimed last March at Champaign.
W A.! ..NJONES, conferen c e
chamnpion at 145 pounds, isthe
only champ not returning to de SS
fend his title this year.

I
I

'1'Ice Meit, u)I;) ;O WN APPEAR

11innin-g onily tit o ut of six
conlferenc(e ma th:ies, Michigan
is not to be entirely counted out
of the running. Coach Keen re-
called the close match with Pur-
due, which the Wolverines lost
16-15, as evidence of their un-
derlying strength.
"Most of our boY have been
competing over their heads this
season," Keen stated, "but this
weekend they'll be at their right-
ful positions."
At the present time, defending
conference ch ;ullicons a;er: 115
pounds. Arnold Plaza of Purdue;
121 pounds, Garth Lappin of
Minnesota: 128 pounds, Allen Rice
of Minnesota: 136 pounds, Jim
Smith of Michigan; 155 pounds,
Ken Marlin of Illinois: 165
pounds, Clarence Self of Wiscon-
sin; 175 pounds, Joe Scarpello of
Iowa;; heavyweight. Chuck Gott-
fried of Illinois; 191 pounds, Verne
Gagne of Minnesota.
In this year's competition, the
115 and 191 pound classifications
have been eliminated.

In response to this unusualr
situation, Coach Keen termed - PRES IIOLMES, Night Editor
the forthcoming tournament "as l
promising to be the greatest dis-
play of wrestling talent in the The consolation matches are also
history of the Big Nine." run off Saturday which decide
Pre-tournament favorites going third and fourth places in the
into the finals will be Purdue, de- tourney. Contestants in the con-
fending conference champions, solation bouts are those wrestlers
Illinois and Minnesota in that or- who have been defeated by the
der. Although Minnesota has finalists.

O V E R

1 00 Y EARS

A T M I C H I G

A N

By BEV BUSSEY
Sports Feature Editora
The Michigan Sailing Club isI
leaving no stones unturned.
Although April 15 seems to be
the accepted date for commission-
ing, Ed Bainbridge, chief instruc-
tor of tile club, has hoisted sails
for the group to get underway
next week.
BAINBRIDGE has set up lhis
shore school and expects it to be
the best in the Midwest. To more
than a hundred newcomers it-
tending the first meeting, he ex-{
plained that the function of the
club is to teach everyone how to
get out and handle a sailboat. The
racing knack will come in time.
The emphasis this year will
be on practical work. During the
week they'll learn fundamentals
and concentrate on blackboard
work the same as the varsity
football team.
But starting next weekend class
room sessions will also be held out
at Whitmore Lake- despite the
fact that the ice is still thick
enough for ten-ton trucks to drive
over.
ACCORDING TO Jim Wukin,
commodore of the Michigan Sail-I

in- Club, "This supervised train-
ing is so much better than kick-
ing around and picking things up
individually. You still get the x-
perience, but you get the essen-
tials."'
The idea behind, this pro-,
gram is to ground the neweom-
will be able to pass the skipper's
test within a short time after
launching.
In the second regatta of the
,season, in competition against
Notre Dame, all the members will
get a chance to either skipper or
crew. This will serve as an elim-
ination within the club to see who
\vill compete in future regattas.
"Besides trying to beat Notre
DGame, this is the only fair way
to pick the skippers so that no
one will feel that he is being
given a raw deal," Rukin said.
BASKETBALL SCORES
Princeton 48, Columbia 45.
Syracuse 70, Canisius 58.
West Virginia 75, Geneva (Pa.)
38.
Penn State 52, Temple 41.
HOCKEY SCORES
P-troit 1. Boston 1
Chicago 5, New York 2

ji8r

it

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{'.cgitIa r quca/il - -a ll 0 fabr/cs

Slacks $8.95 to $12.95 Coats $12.50 to $22.95

(rcgularly ,12.95 to $16.50)

(regularly $25.00 to $35.00)

Street

WA4(err-

at
Liberty

I -

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I WON'T TAKE PART IN THE 7
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RAW 020
rte?

He dresses
for the ladies,...

-FH THANKYOU! EVER SINCI
SWITCHED TO PHILIP MORRIS
Y DISPOSITION HAS
~EENASNICE AS YOU
LADES AVE MADE
MEOOK! l l
M'ADEAAOISEI.LE,1
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DE LA CREME MY DEAR YOU'LL BE
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SHE '$QUITE -
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TOHELPHER'

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