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February 27, 1949 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-02-27

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, FEBkUARY 27, 1949

.. . ............... ....... . .. . . . .................. . ...

t ,

HEAD FOR THE HILLS:
Grads Drop Dignity To
Join Outing Club Events
By BUDDY ARONSON
Who said grad students are dignified?
Giving the lie to this popular misconception are the be-moc-
casined, dungaree-clad stalwarts who compose the Graduate Outing
Club.
* *
THESE OUTDOOR enthusiasts assemble at 2:15 p.m. every
Sunday at the Rackham Building prior to embarking on the after-
noon's expedition. This may include anything from hiking to canoe-
ing, depending on the weather and the whims of members.
Informality is the keynote to the extent that each Sunday
the grads participate in whatever activity they desire. Thus one
group may decide to go bicycling and another iee skating.
Automobile riding, however, is verboten.
The Club's hardier souls pride themselves on their hiking prow-
ess, labeling as "softies" their compatriots who condescend to exercise
by pushing pedals or pressing down accelerators.
UPON COMPLETION of the day's activity, the members return
to the Club's quarters at the Rackham Building for a hardy supper
prepar'ed by one of the group's aspiring chefs. A rousing songfest
terminates the day's informal program.
Overnight hikes are among the most popular of the club's
activities.
Recently such a trek was undertaken to the South Lyon Youth
Hostel, but several members complained that the trip was too easy
because all supplies were brought to the Hostel via automobile.
Club President Hugh Gundel promised to alleviate the situation on
the next overnight by requiring each member--women included-to
carry his own equipment.
WEDDING BELLS have been thinning out the . Outing Club's
ranks of late, according to Gundel. He complained that the Club's
atmosphere was apparently too conducive to romance, citing the large
number of marriages that have taken place within the ranks of the
organization.
.Gundel invited all hardy grads, "especially women," interested in
joining the Club to meet at 2:15 today at the northwestcorner of
Rackham, prepared for a vigorous afternoon's activity.
Statistics Show College Men
Face Greater Job Problem

U' Chemistry STUDENT I ROFIlE:
Biiiiig Will 'Fire Bal' c
ans,(1T11OR'S NOTE1K: Tkis i i lthe
second in a se:ries of intervi ews th
wfyAithli campus proaite ih rg
Cast of Annex Cmts «wm appar as awrsns
FUnds for Project "

I eiia Needs Own Phone

reasons for admmistrat ive
lations." she said.
Ti l.",, I ii ~ibur of te Cor-
!' oiji ; iu nt A f fairs, tle
ugan Futmii comm it'te, th

By PETE 11OT1"TEN
Workmen have transferred their
labors from the recently complet -
ed chemistry building to the old j
building which is getting its face
lifted.
Some of the plans originally
made for the face lifting have
been cancelled. because of exces-
sive expenditures on thenewu cc.-
dition, according to L. 0. Case,
chairman of the building com-
mittee.
BUT THE job isn't all face-z
lifting, he said. Much of the work
being done is rebuilding damaged
rooms and cognating the old with
the new. The work is expected to
be done before the end of the
present semester.
Many of the rooms on the
east side of the old building
were blocked from light by the
closeness of the two structures,
so they had to be changed from
offices and research rooms to
preparation rooms for experi-
ments used in the new lecture
room and for special dark rooms
and cloakrooms where light is
unnecessary.
The windows of these unlighted

B1 ROMIA I KI. Y
The girls at Gamma ihi Beta
are thinking of requestng another
phone - a Irivat One - for Pat
MVcl~inna. whose buiniss calls
keep the lines continuously tied
up.
Pat, who is l)resid(ent of t he
League Council, is oe of the busi-
est women on c(ampus, but this
gal., effervescent as a bottle 01
inger ale. k it all in 01r1
stride.
HER AMAZING energy and red
hair have earned her the name
' Fireball," but Pat says hiz job
as League Presiden. is so iuterest-
ing shue wishes every gill onm cini.
j pus could cet a t astc of 1t.
Besides ioordinating and ov-
erseeing all League activities,
she is invited to sit in on every
important administrative board
and committee on which stu-
dents are represented.
"The meetings are vastly inter-
esting, and give you an entirely1
different view of University ad-
ministration. Now that I'm look-
ing at it from the inside, I can see
I Young GOP's
Re ai, Untv

M;.

with "Miss Mac," Women's Social
Director.
"We are two hard-headed
Irishmen working hand in
glove," Pat says.
When she's not at a meeting or
in the League Undergraduate Of-
fice, Pat can be found in the vi-
cinity of the Speech department,
where her main interest lies in the
radio field. She has been doing
radio work in Buffalo since she
was in the eighth grade.
PAT'S HOME is in Snyder, N.Y.
She has spent the last few sum-
mer's doing radio or fashion work
in nearby Buffalo, and has work-
ed as a model and planned fashion
shows for a large department
store.
Pat combined her dramatic
talents and League work last
year when she directed the Jun-
ior Girl's Play. She finds that
League activities take up a great
deal of time, but "It's well worth
it--and my grade point average
has gone up since I entered ac-
tivities."
She is a member of Zeta Phi
Eta, national speech honorary sor-
ority, and Mortarboard, women's
honorary society.
After graduation this June, Pat
will spend the summer taking a
well-earned rest, and then go into

Daily-Howe
POTENTIAL PH.D. DANIEL MILLER
... digs into books in his library carrell
Potential PhD's Find Secluded
LibraryCarrells Study Haven

PAT McKENNA
.. .busy coed on campus
Advisory Board for WSSF, and the
DP Committee. Her League ac-

Record-breaking college enroll-
ments since the end of the war
will, inmthe coming years, result in
increased competition for profes-
sional and administrative workers,
according to a report by the U.S.
Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Because of the unprecedented
number of college graduates en-
tering the business fields, the re-
cent report stated, employment
Prof. Laing To
PublishArticle
An article on international law
written by Prof. Lionel H. Laing
of the political science depart-
ment, has been selected for pub-
lication in a national law review
of Mexico.
Originally published in the
December, 1946, issue of the Mich-
igan Law Review, the article is
entitled "Historic Origins of Ad-
miralty Jurisdiction in England."
It will be reprinted in the "Re-
vista de law Escuela Nacional de
Jurisprudencia," published in
Mexico City.

requirements for many kinds of
jobs are "likely to be raised."
* * *
THE REPORT suggests that, in
order to eliminate an overhigh
competitve standard, veterans
choose educational or training
courses "as closely related as pos-
sible to their interests and indi-
vidual capacities."
Those men considering an of-
fice occupation should consider
specific training, because the
preference will undoubtedly fall
to workers with business expe-
rience, rather than to holders
of liberal arts degrees only, Bu-
reau spokesmen"added.
The prospective graduates will
be well-advised to weigh more of
the less-crowded, though perhaps
less glamorous fields, they de-
clared.
* * *
"THE VETERAN should take
subjects which will enable him to
qualify for more than a single
type of job," they said.
Vocational counselors and ap-
praisers in nationwide VA guid-
ance centers are intending to use
this report as an aid in advising
disabled veterans planning edu-
cation and training courses.

By MARIAN LARSON
Ph.D.'stdon't "just grow" like
Topsy; they face language re-
quirements and subject require-
ments and theses - with the
perennial problem of how and
where to study.
Doctoral degree candidates who
have passed the preliminaries, or
will shortly, and are finishing up
theses are provided much desired
private study space by the general
library.
* - *
SCATTERED AROUND the five
floors of the library's stacks are
one hundred small, white cubicles
-or carrells-offering all the op-
portunities of stack permission
and uninterrupted study.
Students working for masters
degrees have the opportunity to
use the stacks, but the carrells
are reserved for potential Ph.
D.'s.
And they arc eager to use them.j
11E AI

Many more apply for carrells than E
can be accommodated, according1
to Fred L. Dimock. chief circula-
tion librarian, who is in charge of
distributing them.r
* *
CARRELL assignments carry
with them the privilege of reserv-;
ing books in the carrell. After a1
month in a carrell a book can be
charged out by anyone, but the
carrell occupant has the right of
reclaiming it when it is returned.
Carrell books can be used in
the building any time, provided
the carrell occupant is not using
them.
According to Dimock, not too
many students lose their carrells
from noticeable lack of work-
some spend ten hours a day in
theirs. The only way space is
created for the ever-present appli-
cants is when someone gets his
Ph.D. and leaves.

rooms are being blocked up for
eonomy, ugt wherethe neebd o Constitutional misinterpretations
them is urgent, shelves are being caused some confusion among the
built in the window frames. young Republicans but "unity" is
Sonce again reported from their
TO MAKE EACH building ac- ranks.
cessible from the inside, two con- ln attempting to comply with i
necting ramps were built on each a University deadline for sub-
floor. The ramps took up valu- 'tting the names of club of ficers,
able space, so one large room was the group held a hasty election
built where two smaller rooms meeting.
were formerly. A complaint to the Office of
Student Affairs by Ienry Willard.
Electrical outlet boxes were former chairman of the Publicity
right in the way of all the pro- Committee, revealed that an ar-
posed ramp spaces, so each box ticle in the club's Constitution
had to be changed to where requires that a nominating com-
there was wall space, at one of mittee be appointed 30 days be-
the biggest single expenses to fore elections.
the old building's repair. Since this pr'ovision has not
been complied with. it was decided
When the repair work is com- that the newly-elected officers
pleted, Case said, there will be would remain until March 24,
fewer offices and lighted research when a new election will be held.
rooms but more space for special- David Armstrong. Robert Snow-
ized work and storage, as well as berger, and Philip Berry were des-
two more laboratories in the old ignated as tie nominating con-
building. mittee.

tivities keep her in close contact teaching or radio work.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN UNION OPERA
presents
F ROGGY BOTTOM
"A Hilarious Musical Comedy"
Michigan Theater 8:30 P.M. March 23, 24, 25
Send me.................tickets at $2.40 $1.80 $1.20 for
the March 23, '24, 25 perfor e one
(circle one)
I enclose a check, money order for $.....................
(circle one)
Payable to the Michigan Union
Name ................................................
Address. ...... ..................
Please enclose self addressed stamped envelope.

L

, ' Ij'Continuous Daily from 1:30 P.M.
Playing Thru Tuesday
At 2:55 - 6:20 - 9:45 P.M. -
THE YEAR'S COMEDY HIT/
GREER GA RSON
TWALTER
PII)GEON i
EliabethrTAYLOR "Cesar ROMERO +
Plus: At 1:30 - 4:50 - 8:15PM

D THE CLASSIFIE DS

Personals?

Transportation?

Sales? Housing?

Classifieds solve your problems!

,

I

Continuous
from 1 P.M.

- Now!

FOR RENT
TWO-ROOM partly furnished apart-
ment, $75 per month. Phone 6415.
For good accommodations
bring your overnight or
weekend1 guests to t he
PIERCE TRANSIENT HOME
1133 E. Ann Phone 8144
BUSINESS SERVICES
LAUNDRY - Washing and/or ironing.
Done in my own home. Have stretch-
er for wool socks.Free pickup and
delivery. Phone 2-9020.?
LEARN TO DANCE
JIMMIE HUNT DANCE STUDIOS
209 S. State St. Ph. 8161 )5B
EXCESS HAIR removed permanently by
short wave method. Approved by
Am. Med. Ass'n. Call Marie's Beauty
Shop, 2-6696. )14
DRESSMAKING ALTERATIONS
TAILORING
Prices Reasonable 22020
)3B
CUSTOM CLOTHES. Restyling. Alter-
ations. Prompt service on all altera-
tions. Hildegarde Shoppe. 109 E.
Washington. Phone 2-4669. )4B

SPRING $PORTS
are beginning now!
Get the most from your
old equipment by selling
through a "FOR SALE"
ad in Classifieds.
Call 23-24-1
BOOKS
BARGAINS IN OLD BOOKS
On All Subjects - Good Browsing
5c and .up
on the Mezzanine
OVERBECK BOOKSTORE
1216 South University 16

TYPING
TYPING WANTED, rapid, accurate, at
Coats, and dresses. Full or part time.
Dixie Shops, 224 S. Main. )711
HELP WANTED
SALESLADIES . Experienced. Suits,
reasonable rates. Phone 2-3357. )1W
PERSONAL
COTTON SLIP by Realcraft, sanforized,
eyelet trim, sizes 32-38 $1.79. Ran-
dall's, 306 South State St. )l0P
SOCIAL CHAIRMEN: The Mack lergu-
son Trio is now boo'ing spring dates.
Leave calls at 2-4183. )13P
A MESSAGE to our missing salesman:
Stop sending people in for cold beer.
Call 2-9409 and find out what we do
sell. Office Equipment Service Com-
pany, 1116 South Universirv. )IIB
ROOMS FOR RENT

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Works of Elgin Wrist Watch. If
found. plcase call 2-2119. )itL
[OsT-lack Schaelt r li with sjivr
LOST-K&I, Slide Rule. Name on case,
P. It. Visser. Please phone 5 5 W Ply-
mouth. Reward.
LOST: Black leather pocketbook. initi-
als KT, with little ioney, but. 11 Com
caril, license, c~', ol value to mil WE
alone. on Thurs. ev, Feb. 2. In Or
around Natural Biene uilding. Re-
turn to -0:-7 NS or 121 Cam-ridge
Ct. appreciated.-

in
D, I

g "LOVES OF CARMEN"
! "SECRET SERVICE INVESTIGATOR"
Weekday Matinees 25c - Evenings and Sundays 35c

TODAY '[1[iJ O
) ,41

DRESS MAKING, Alterations and cus-
tom made clothes. Call 8350. )15B
WE PLAN TO BUILD
several exceptionally nice 3 bedroom
homes on beautiful % and 1 acre
sites. Only 3 minutes drive from
campus. Some will be for sale, others
for rent. For details address Michi-
gan Daily, Box 180. )16B

LADI ES'
Tailoring
Alterations - Remodeling
A. GINSBURG
Phone 2-3481 for appointments

18B 1.

DOUBLE ROOM for 2 male students. '
Pleasant front room. Phone 2-2052.
WEEKEND ROOMS available in private
homes. Call Student Room Bureau,'
2-8827, 11:30-12, 6:30-7:00. )1R
NOTICE GI's--Rooms for rent for sum-
mer months with or without board.
1108 Hill, 2-8266. ;
DOUBLE room equipped for studentsaV i
comfort. Would consider single oc- -J U! Y' V L GA"l t p
cupant. Ph. 8278. )35R" '
ARBORETUM at the door, shower, sep-
arate entrance. Room for male stud-
ent to share with graduate. Cali
2-3080. )36R
FOR SALEM
CLARINET, B Flat Ebonite. Write Box
179, Michigan Daily. )56
TUXEDO-Excellent condition, size 38.
Phone 2-1909 Sunday until 5 p.m.
weekdays 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. )58
TYPEWRITER-Old, but in good run-
ning condition, $15. Call 7110 eve-
nings. )57
'36 CHEVROLET Standard Sedan. Good
mechanical condition. Price asked,
$200.00. Call John Slater, 2-9318 or
2-6500. )55
BABY Parakeets and Canaries. Bird
supplies and cages. Moderate prices,
562 S. Seventh. Phone 5330. )4
LUCKY YOU! Short - Medium - Long
When you buy proportionate skirts
in fine worsted wool-n-wool $
rayon gabardine at
THE ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP
309 South State Street
FLUTE-Haynes French model, hand-
made, sterling silver, open tone holes.
In excellent condition-used only 6
months. Worth $325 new. Sell for $240.
Pads perfect. Includes tailored lea-
ther case. Phone Don Anderson, 2-8242
9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. )54
JUKE BOX automatic changer, twelve
records, Maple Finish. Fine for fra-
ternity house or recreation room. I
Good buy, $80. Ph. 2-2183, after 6
p.m. 146L -

v ncCn rn U lI

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VuuI~UI5I B WIE~h -' ~ II &

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