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October 02, 1948 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-02

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r0

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2,1948

i

U.S. Prestige

Lost

In Germany-B rke
By JIM MARCHEWKA
Respect for the United States has been lost in Germany, George
J. Burke, a judge at the Nuernberg trials, declared in a panel discussion
at the Rackham Amphitheatre yesterday.
Addressing a group of Press Club members and guests, the Ann
Arbor attorney declared that statesmen should forego barnstormin/
the country and figure a way of restoring American prestige in Ger-
many.
* * *
GERMAN CHILDREN are seen rummaging around in garbage
cans to rescue cigarette butts a quarter of an inch long, he said. After
seeing their emaciated faces day after day, the United States can
wonder what it has to make the Germans believe in democracy, he
asserted.
The only hope is that divine providence *may suggest some
manner of bringing to countless millions a hope of security and
peace, the attorney maintained.
Economic insecurity and a dearth of political leadership are
problems that face Greek restoration at the present, according to
Prof. John P. Dawson, of the Law. School, who recently returned
from his duties as foreign trade administrator in Greece.
PROF. DAWSON EXPLAINED to newspapermen attending the
panel discussion that every piece of tillable land is being used by the
Greeks, but there are not enough productive areas to supply the
Greeks adequately.
He continued that every industry is dependent on imports for
essential supplies. Devastation left by the Germans and the con-
tinued destruction of civil war make it difficult to rebuild Greece
and restore it to pre-war standards.
Political leaders differ among themselves because of their indi-
vidualistic viewpoints and the complicated history of Greece's politi-
cal development, he added.
AID FROM THE MARSHALL PLAN cannot be effective unless
the littlei countries are able to help themselves in the opinion of Gerd
H. Padel, University Press Club Fellow in Journalism.
Europe has to find its own balance first in a federation, he de-
clared.
The self governing small political unit has succeeded in the gov-
ernments of Belgium, Holland, and Denmark, he said. Disturbance in
France is a result of its high degree of centralization, he pointed out.
Plan Meeting Alleged Killers
For Candidates To Give Pleas

Predict Reds
Will Stay in
UN Council
Profs Minimize
Berlin Crisis
By ALLAN CLAMAGE
Russia is not likely to withdraw
from the UN over the Berlin crisis,
according to opinions expressed by
Profs. Lawrence Preuss and Mar-
shall Knappen, of the political sci-
ence department.
As the situation exists in the UN
today, "Russia has achieved all of
the advantages of withdrawal, but
none of the disadvantages," Prof.
Preuss said. Soviet use of the veto
has effectively checked any UN
actions which might be construed
as against Soviet interests.
* * ~
THE EFFECT of Russia's ex-
tensive use of the veto power has
been to stymie UN action and to
split-it in effect, if not in actual-
ity, Preuss said. He added that
one solution to this Russian im-
posed inertia seems to lie in or-
ganizations similar to the West-
ern European Union.
According to Article 51 of the
UN charter, there is nothing to
prevent treaties of collective
self defense among nations.
This piovision will permit the
organization of a western bloc
similar to the one Russia has es-
tablisheds inher sphere of influ-
ence, he said.
RUSSIA REALIZES the value
of the UN as a sounding board for
her propaganda, Prof. Knappen
said.
The Soviets seems to be using
the UN rather than working
with it, he said. The USSR is, in
fact, not a full fledged member
of the UN,ihe pointed out, be-
cause, of the many commissions
established by the UN, Russia is
a member of only World Health
Organization, and International
Postal Union
In order to keep tabs on the
work of the other vital commis-
sions, such as the Atomic Energy,
World Monetary Fund and
UNESCO, Russia must maintain
unimpaired her position on the
Big Five, he added.

FOOTBALL ORIENTATION:
Foreign Students Get Grid Lesson

SOMEBODY CONFUSED?-In lieu of an elephant, Gov. Earl
Warren makes friends with the symbol of the Democratic party,
while attending a rally in mid-town Manhattan. The donkey
is the mascot of the Citizens Non-Partisan Committee of Brooklyn.
BEGIN LIVES ANEW:
NewsrnenLearn HowsState
Prisoners Re-enter Society

It may be unbelievable, but
there are students in Ann Arbor
who have never seen a football
game.
When Albert C. Katzenmeyer,
assistant supervisor in physical ed-
ucation, asked his International
Center audience how many had
never seen a grid squadin aaction,
at least four students raised their
hands. Coach Katzenmeyer then
proceeded to go into the fine
points of unbalanced line strategy
and the single wing formation.
NSA AND THE International
Center were joint sponsors of this,
the first orientation program for
foreign students. The problem of
football now out of the way, the
National Student Association
plans to run a whole series of pro-
grams designed to make the for-
eign students on campus feel more
at home in their new environ-
ment.
Among the fifty students at
the program there were many
native students who felt the
need to brush up on their foot-
ball knowledge so they'll be able
to join the shouting and yelling
in today's Oregon game.'
There were also a couple of sus-
pected fugitives from football
practice. One of them said: "Be
sure to explain the rules about
a fumble, Coach."
** *
AFTER THE explanatory talk,
Coach Bert Katzenneyer showed
how football works in practice, by
running off the technicolor movies
of last season's great Rose Bowl
game.
. Most of the students found.
the lecture and commentary to
.the film very helpful. Gordon.
Da .Costa,. Portuguese .Indian.
studying for a doctor's degree
in botany, called football "rough,
but interesting."
He was still uneasy about the
term "football." "When other
countries play football-soccer,
that is-the ball is kicked around,
but here if you kick the ball, it's
no good," he said.
* * *
ANOTHER GRADUATE student
from India, Shantha, found the
game rather discontinuous and
hard to follow, but said he liked
"the way they're fighting."
Newcomers to the sport were
surprised by the importance of
the "football industry." They

heard Katzenmeyer call football
"one of the leading contribu-
tions to the prestige of a col-
lege."
The University golf coach went
on to show the growth of football
at the University from a minor
sport 60 years ago to its present
position, where it can now pay

D"AILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Readjusting prisoners for civil-
ian life requires proper classifica-
tion of age groups and criminal
types, according to Joseph W.
Sanford, Commissioner of the De-
partment of Corrections, in a
panel discussion before the noon
.session of the Press Club yester-
day.
In the next few days habitual
offenders at the Ionia institution
will be removed to Jackson Prison,
Commissioner Sanford told news-
papermen at the Rackham amphi-
theatre. Those that remain will
be placed in age groups so that no
offender will be harmed by im-
proper treatment, he declared.
* * * '
THE CAMP - SYSTEM has
worked successfully at Jackson
Prison, the commissioner asserted.
W. J. Maxey, Direcor of the
State Department of Social

Welfare, also spoke to the news-
men and explained that reduc-
tion in the welfare personnel
during relatively good times
would be penny wise and pound
foolish.
The fundamental concept of
democratic government is to take
care of its own people, he said.
Disregard of the family unit in
time of distress is a step toward a
totalitarian government, he main-
tained.
* * *
PROVISIONS for the mentally
ill is below popular need, Dr. R. L.
Dixon, Acting Director of the De-
partment of Mental Health,
pointed out at the discussion. An
additional 5,530 beds are needed
in Michigan mental institutions
to meet the average of the top ten
states, he affirmed.

for the upkeep of our huge ath-
letic plant.
So far, there are no foreign stu-
dents on the varsity squad. But
maybe in ten years students will
come here from China and South
America just to be able to play
ball on the Michigan team. Who
knows?

Publication in The Daily Official <
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin shouldbe sent in
typewritten form to the office of
the Assistant to the President, Room
.021 Angel Hall, by 3:00 p.m. on the
day preceding publication (11:00
a.m. Saturdays).
Notices
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1948
VOL. LIX, No. 11
Faculty Meeting, College of Lit-
erature, Science, and the Arts.
4:10 p.m., Oct. 4, Rm. 1025 Angell
Hall.
AGENDA
1. Consideration of the minutes
of the meeting of Jun 7, 1948 (pp.
1433-1434).
2. Presentation of new mem-
bers.
3. Resolutions for Professors E.
L. Adams, J. W. Bradshaw, J. L.
Brumm, L. C. Karpinski, and M.
S. Pargment.
4. Memorial for Professor Em-
eritus Wilber R. Humphreys.
5. Consideration of reports sub-
mitted with the call to this
meeting.
a. Executive Committee-Prof.
C. D. Thorpe.
b. Executive Board of the Grad-
uate School-Prof. R. C. Angell.
c. Deans' Conference - Dean
Hayward Keniston. No report.
6. Announcements.
7. New business.
University Direcvory changes
cannot be accepted after October
4.
Applications for Grants in Sup-
port of Research Projects:
It is requested that faculty
members desiring grants from the
Research Funds in support of re-
search projects to begin early in
1949 file their proposals in the Of-
fice of the Graduate School by
Fri., Oct. 8, 1948. Requests for con-
tinuation of present projects or
for projects to be initiated during
the next fiscal year should be
made at a date early next year to
be announced later. Application
forms will be mailed or can be ob-
tained at Rm. 1006 Rackham Bldg.
Telephone 372.

Academic Notices
Freshman Health Lectures for
Women
First Semester 1948-49
. It is a University requirement
that all entering freshmen take a
series of Health Lectures and to
pass an examination on the con-
tent of these lectures. Transfer
students with freshman standing
are also required to take the course
unless they have had a similar
course elsewhere, which has been
accredited here.
Upprclassmen who were here as
freshmen and who did not fulfill
the requirements are requested to
do so this term.
The lectures will be given in the
Natural Science Auditorium at
4:00 p.m. and repeated at 7:30
p.m. as per the following sched-
uled:
Lecture 1, Mon., Oct. 4; Lecture
2, Tues., Oct. 5; Lecture 3, Wed.,
Oct. 6; Lecture 4, Thurs., Oct. 7;
Lecture 5, Mon., Oct. 11; Lecture 6,
Tues., Oct. 12; Lecture 7, (Final
Exam.), Wed., Oct. 13.
Please note that attendance is
required and roll will be taken.
Enrollment will be held at the first
lecture.
Concerts
Carillon Recital: The sixth pro-
gram in the current series of ca-
rillon recitals by Percival Price,
University Carillonneur, will be
presented at 2:15 p.m., Sun., Oc-
tober 3. It will include instrumen-
tal works, selections from oratorio,
compositions for a musical clock,
and selections from opera by
George F. Handel.
University Musical Society Con-
certs.
Choral Union Series;
Eileen Farrell, Soprano, Octo-
ber 6; French National Orchestra,
Charles Munch, Conductor, Octo-
ber 25; Cleveland Orchestra,
George Szell, Conductor, Novem-
ber 7; Ezio Pinza, Bass, November
18; Clifford Curzon, Pianist, No-
vember 27; Boston Symphony Or-
(Continued on Page 4)

Request Would-Be
LegislatorsTo Work
Students interested in running
for the Student Legislature in No-
vember will have an opportunity
to work with the organization be-
fore the election, according to Jake
Jacobson, Election Committee
chairman.
A meeting will be held at 7:30
p.m. Thursday in the League for
all interested students.
The Legislature last spring
passed a motion suggesting that
prospective candidates work with
khe Legislature before elections in
order to familiarize themselves
with its functioning.
"Interested Students will attend
legislative meetings and work on
our projects," Jacobson said.

ART CINEMA LEAGUE
"If DON'T MISS IT!'.M
"BOLD AND EXCITING!"
-The Nw Yk
DOSTOYE VSKY'S
.GE FEUILLE

Kenneth Basha, 22, and William3
Swarthout, 19, both of Dearborn,
were bound over to Circuit Court
yesterday on charges of first de-
gree murder.
The pair, held for the brutal
murder of Dearborn cab driver
Francis R. Andrews on Sept. 20
near Willow Village, will enter
pleas upon arraignment in Circuit
Court within two weeks.
The suspects were bound over
to the, higher court by Municipal
Judge Jay H. Payne following the
testimony of a mutual friend,
Larry Peters, 20, also of Dearborn.
Peters admits that information
he told Dearborn police and Wash-
tenaw County Sheriff deputies led
to the arrest of the two men.
Composers Sought
By Union Opera
The Michigan Union Opera
Committee will hold a music writ-
ers meeting at 7:30 p.m. Monday,
in the third oor music room of
the Union.
All persons who were at the
spring meetings are asked by Dave
Leyshan, committee chairman, to
attend this session.
Inflation will hit us too-
soon-Buy NCN now.
After the Game
TODAY
Meet us at the
D EN
for
"Just Good Food"
1311 So. U.-2 Drs. east of Forest

FOR SALE

SATURDAY, OCT. 2

50c

8:30 P.M.

Those good-looking Cravenetted rain-
coats at the ELIZABETH DILLON
SHOP give you such a lovely way to
be caught in the rain. Priced from
$16.95.)1
DIAMOND Ring. .25 Carat. Baguettes.
White gold mount, yellow gold band.
$150, sell $120. Box 135. )76
1936 NASH, good condition, new tires,
clean throughout. Call Parsons, 3-1511
Ext. 361. )75
1935 DeSOTO. - Mechanically sound.
Must sell immediately. $250.00. Phone
C. Geib, 25-9502. )74
CAMERA-Kodak Bantam Special; f.2
lens; speeds up to 1/500 second; $95.00.
Call Ed Sprague, 2-6671. )81
1935 CHEVROLET, 2-door, deluxe. Very
good condition, heater. Call Elkins,
2-3481 evenings. Make an offer. )20
TYPEWRITER, practically new, noise-
less Remington. Full-size. 1208 GranI
ger. )82
1939 MERCURY Rebuilt motor. New
transmission, new tires. Lou Allen.
708 E. Kingsley. )26
1936 CHEVROLET Standard Two door.
Excellent mechanical condition. Body
fair. Two new tires and heater. Ph.
Ypsi 3977J4 after 5:30 weekdays. )80
BABY PARAKEETS-Beautiful singing
canaries. Bird supplies and cages.
Ruffins Melody Bird Shop, 562 S. 7th.
) 18
PURE BRED GREAT DANE
6 mos. Broke. Handles well
Excellent Health. Dark Brindle.
Male. Call 8856 after 7 p.m.
)49
ES'TABLISHED Sandwich Service for
Fraternities, Sororities, and Dormi-
tories. Good profits. Call 7211 at
mealtimes. )50
Need a Good Place to Live?
Louis trailer, 1946 24-ft. Admiral, is
ready to move into behind 1880 Pack-
ard. Reduced price. Terms )51
INTRODUCTORY OFFER. Reader's Di-
gest. 7 mos., $1.00, plus free gift book.
Brauff Agency
1257 Sudbury
Willow Village )83
Frame your face in one of our perky
fall hats. A felt bonnet trimmed with'
a gay feather to go with your new
fall suit or a velvet cap to match your
favorite date dress.
$3.95 and $5.0T
COUSINS ON STATE STREET )2

FOR SALE
WEBSTER Record Changer. Ex. cond.
Reasonable price. 1204 Oakland. Ph.
2-5275. )66
DODGE 4-door-'37 - New Engine,
front end, tires. See at 1379 Juansea,
Willow Village or contact Gil Vickers
Sch. of Mus., 12:30 til 1:00.
)53
TPYEWRITER, practically new, noise-
less Remington. Full-size. Ph. 2-4832
evenings. )82
TYPEWRITER--Factory rebuilt. Guar-
anteed 1 year. Also language type
machine $50 and up. Portables. Aero
Radio. 335 S. Main. )28
MUSKRAT COAT, sable-dyed musk-
rat, good condition. Size 9 or 10. Call
25-9394. )84
1937 TUDOR FORD, new tires, Radio,
Heater, new sealed beams: Recently
rebuilt motor. Body excellent. Call
2-7179. )86
1 James 125cc motorcycle, $250. Never
used. 1 125cc French Motobecane
cycle, $200. Never used. 1 Servi-cycle,
$125, in very good condition.
Call 2-3173 between 9 and 5 daily.
)87
LADIES wool gabardine jadpurs, size
14 and jadpur boots 6AA. Practically
new-$13.00. Phone 2-0961 )85
N W LINQUAPHONE German lan-
guage records 30 lessons - $30.
Schwinn "Continental" bike, 3 Mo.'s
old. $75 when new. Still like new. $45
Box 138 )88

TWO experienced baby sitters desire
regular or short notice work. Write
Box 136 for further particulars. )lE
FOR RENT
SMALL furnished cottage at Winan's
Lake, Lakeland. Electric range, re-
frigerator, oil heat. Brighton 3375. )5R
FOR RENT-Football weekend guest
Rooms available. Call Student Room
Bureau, 2-8827; 11-12 a.m., 6:30-8 p.m.
)2R
AVAILABLE immediately. Double room
and study to share with male student.
Private residence. Half block from di-
rect bous line. Call evenings, 7-9, Ph.
8890. )4R
WANTED TO BUY
MEN'S thin tire bike with basket. Call
2-7438, 430 Cross. )15
STILL can use two more tickets to
Purdue game. Mul, 512 Williams,
West Quad. 2-4401. )8W
WANTED TO RENT
GARAGE-Vicinity of 300 block Thomp-
son. Reply to Neil C. Bertram, 311
Thompson St., Ani Arbor. )1N
BUSINESS SERVICES
ALTERATIONS - Restyling -Custom
clothes, Hildegarde Shoppe, 109 E.
Washington, Telephone 2-4669. )1B
LAUNDRY-Washing and ironing done
in my home. Free pickup and deliv-
ery. Ph. 2-9020. )3B
BOUGHT AND SOLD--Men's used
clothing by Ben the Tailor at Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. )5B
ROYAL TYPEWRITERS. Standards-
portables-Also Rented, Repaired. We
buy used Typewriters. Office Equip-
ment Service Co. 1116 S. Univ. Ph.
2-9409. 111 S 4th Ave )4B
SADDLE HORSES for hire. Student
rates, week days: $1.50 per hour. Also
horses boarded. Stable % mile south
of Ypsi Airport, corner of U.S. 23 and
U.S. 112 Phone A. W. Cowan, 2-2266 or
871W11 Ypsi )6B
THE "WHISTLE STOP" Diner is
open again. Sandwich delivery serv-
ice from 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. 208 South
Fifth Ave Ph. 4585. Closed Mondays.
)8B

EMPLOYMENT

Classified Advertising +

PERSONAL
FOOTBALL FANS eat Saturday at Mem-
orial Christian Church, Hill at Tap-
pan. Complete plate lunch, 75c. )3P
DID YOU know this about RANDALLS
on State Street?
We have Bobbie Brooks Personalized
monogram sweaters. Slip over-$4.95
or cardigan-$7.95. )2P
A. SPRING
Clocks Watches Jewelry Gifts
221 S. 4th Ave Ph. 4834
4P
SENIORS!!
NEXT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4
Photographers begin taking your
picture for the 1949 yearbook. Make
your appointment now-any after-
noon this week except Saturday,
2-5. Student Publications Building.
)1P
Organizations, sports, clubs,
candid shots-NCN.
DIABOLICAL MILLIONAIRE wants
real blonde secretary for business
trip to Europe, Asia and the Orient.
Must have specifications and quali-
fications above average. Write box
001. ) 5P
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Black Schaeffer Pen, wide gold
band, between E. Madison and Li-
brary Mon. nite. Call Ext. 2144. )2L
LOST-H. N. White Flute. Monday
morning in Angell Hall. Reward.
Phone or write117Lloyd House, West
Quad. )3L
LOST-Friday, a tan leather girl's wal-
net in Angell Hall. Call 2-4561, Room
445. ) 6L
LOST-Wallet in Union Thursday nice.
Reward. Kurtzman-Phone 4986.
)7L
FOR SALE-Man's Bike. Phone 2-9376.
) 77
CROSLEY - 1947, excellent condition.
Ph. 9559 after 6:30 p.m. )73
1934 FORD Tudor, new motor and tires.
Radio, heater and seat covers. Ph.
8341 )78
WHIZZER Motor Bike. Good cond. New
paint, saddle. 2025 Hill St. Ph. 2-6965.
) 67

Continuous
Daily
from t 1P.M.

,
;s

STA
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it

ARTS SUNDAY
CkCWIC l L

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'Ia
® R4o1dSpRVE GiDJ Nw *
t 19e PipT p1CTURj/_ ,

MMM4

LAST
TIMES TODAY!

I/alt V ereGtd ALL NEW MUSICALS
COlON SY TECHNICOLOR

Weekdays
35c
to 5 P.M.

All Seats Reserved
LYDIA MENDELSSOH N
(Michigan League)

i

III
L

HELP WANTED

MICHIGAN

cNDING TODAY
35c until 5 P.M.

SALESMAN, part-time and Saturday.
Ment's clothing. Dixie Shop, 224 S.
Main. )8H
SODA Fountain Help. Mornings and
noon hours. Alexander Drugs. )6H
PART TIME SALESMAN. Inquire Ar-
thur Beden, 216 E. Huron. Ph. 7181
)9H
YOU MAY be a veteran's wife with
experience in a general insurance of-
fice and looking for two, three or
more years' work while on campus.
If so, please write Box 137, Michigan
Daily. )10H
WANTED

Also: CARTOON and NEWS

- ,N2v l1ners

,/ 2~tnCtlo

COMIAG MONDAY, OCT. 11th, 8:15 P.M.
PEASE AUDITORIUM ... YPSILANTI, MICHIGAN
P~asa..
e K INo
i lp
it Sre

WANTED-1000 HEADS!!!
Be they square, round or flat
THELDASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty of f State

)5W

IOMI of GOOD FOOD
418 East Washington
Phone 9717
servinzg
HIVAMUlfVVTmVT1 VthT]\V1?1DQ

Read and Use The Daily Classifieds
OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
Monday: ii1S:turday: 7:30 A.M. - 12:00 Midnight
Sunday: 11:30 A.M. - 12:00 Midnight

Plant to dine at
The Allenel Hotel
THTau., at the Allenel we are prepared to serve you
delicious dinners all week long. Stop in and see how
wonderful eating can be. You'll be happy about
the whole affair. Our main dining room, private
dining rooms, and tap room are all open to you.

GIR(AN ADA

C

AIFIE

I

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