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September 30, 1948 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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THE MICHIGAN RAILY

THUJRSDAY, SEPTE1WBFk 30.94k

-- - - I

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F,

DREAMS COME TRUE:
Engine Student Gels Field Experience

Robert J. Eastman, '49 E. had
an opportunity this summer most
"near" Seniors' dream of -- he
tried out a prospective job to see
how he'd like it.
One of 50 students chosen fromf
leading engineering colleges all1
over the country to take part in
the 1948 summer employment pro-
gram of one of the world's largest
soap companies, Eastman worked
in Chicago.
* * *
THE COMPANY feels that ac-
tual experience is the best answer
to any senior's quandary about
what type he should enter upon
graduation, so it provides the
summer employe with selected
problems which enable him to see
various types of work available in
the plants and laboratories.
Typical of the problems
which Eastman handled were a
determination of the efficiency
of steam boilers and a study of
the space requirements for
maintenance shops in the me-
chanical department.
From reports on his work the
company later will decide about
offering Eastman a job, and East-
man at the same time will be able
to consider an offer with his eyes
wide open.
EASTMAN, WHOSE home is in
Bronxville, New York, attended
Columbia University and Tufts
College before entering the Uni-
versity. He is extremely active in
intramural sports.
He served as an ensign in the
Navy, during the war.

* s

Campus
Calendar
EVENTS TODAY
Union Opera Committee-Meet-
ing of all persons interviewed last
spring, 7:30 p.m., Rm. 3A, Union.
Inter-Racial Association - 7:30
p.m., Union.
Medical Lecture-Dr. Pedro Ba-
lou of University of Argentina,
lecture on central nervous system,
4:15 p.m. Rackham Amphitheatre.
Japanese Lecture-Bunshiro Su-
zuki, Japanese newspaper editor,
8 p.m. Rackham Building, for
Graduate students of Japanese
Studies Center and Japanese Study
Club.
At the Michigan-"Deep Wa-
ters," 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30.
At the State-"Melody Time,"
1, 3, 5, 7, 9.
Deutscher Verein-8 p.m., Un-
ion.
EVENTS TOMORROW
Lecture-Prof. Jean Stoetzel, of
University of Bordeaux and direc-
tor of Frenh Institute of Public
opinion, "World Crisis and Euro-
pean Opinion," 4 p.m., Kellogg
Auditorium.
Phi Kappa Sigma
Chooses Officers
The local chapter of Phi Kappa
Sigma, undergraduate social fra-
ternity, has elected new officers
for the year.
Ernest W. Whitlock, Jr., was
elected president, Lawrence Scott
and Glen Mead were named vice-
presidents, and Henry Hall was
elected treasurer.
The fraternity was represented
on this campus before the war. Its
local chapter was reactivated last
spring. The fraternity recently ac-
quired a house on Lincoln Avenue.
1949 Michiganensian
The college yearbook edited for
everybody.

THIS WORK-A-DAY WORLD:
Trend' Towrd Realismt
Seen in Christmas Tays
By WILLIAM J. CONWAY
CHICAGO-( P)-Christmas will be a day of ease for most of us
-but it will be a workday for a lot of kids.
There is a trend toward realistic playthings that perform actual
services, such as vacuum sweepers that pick up dirt and washing ma-
chinest hat really wash.
A tour of toy manufacturers' showrooms in Chicago's merchan-
dise mart, where the first 1948 Yule tree was lighted last May, brings
out this information:
* * *
THERE WILL be enough toys to go round. But there will be a
short supply of some items, particularly those made of metal.
Prices of some tays will be up.
Others will be unchanged. Toys built for action will be popu-
lar.
Many gifts for the junior set will be reproductions of the things
grownups use.
HERE ARE some of the newer toys being bought by buyers for
retail stores:
Vacuum cleaners made of aluminum and plastic. Each has an
electric motor, a. dust bag and a handle 30 inches long. They op-
erate much like the big ones.
Washers that wash doll clothing. A clock spring motor keeps an
agitator going. There's a wringer with rubber rollers to complete the
chore.
ELECTRIC juke boxes that play records up to 12 inches in diame-
ter. The pressed board cabinet is 16 by 14 inches. The plastic front
has a variety of colors and lights up.
Scale model road graders. They're made of steel, weigh ten
pounds, have balloon tires, a steering wheel and a scraper blade.
Miniature automobiles fitted with batteries that sound a push
button horn and provide current for the headlights.
RADIO PHONES-One tube, portable radios styled like cradle tele-
phones. Children can pick tip the receiver, dial a radio station and
listen to a program.
Cutout books made of latex rubber. Moppets can cut out the
dogs, lambs and cats; then blow them up like balloons.
Housekeeping kits containing wet and dry mops and brushes.
Little fire stations that house a pump engine and a ladder truck.
When a hand crank is turned, a bell rings, the doors open and springs
send both vehicles rolling to a building across an imaginary street.
A thumb-operated lever on the pump engine presses water through
a hose and it squirts out on painted flames.

Ice-Cold Coca- Cola
Adids Zest to Lunch

Ask for it either way ... both
trade-marks mean the same thing.

BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY
ANN ARBOR COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY
© 1948, The Coca-Cola Company
Read and Use Daily Classified Ads

MAJORS
e/

"""tRFeCrTDOETHER

.00 for 3 S
.50 tor41S

fcoreS rit1Frater oItY or
core rih1Srrit0

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1C

In Feather Fleece
$4.95

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FIRST PRIZE
A Stunning Large Screen61dfUdt
Television Set with full 13 Channel
coverage and Direct-View 10" Tube.
This handsome prize goes to the
Group entering the most ballots dur-
ing entire contest.

SECOND PRIZE
A Beautiful dWi4a1 Auto-
matic Radio-Phonograph Console
with Miracle Tone Arm. Plays
both 45-minute and standard
records-for Group with second
highest numberof ballotsentered.

THIRD PRIZE
Gdmuea Console Radio
Phonograph with Miracle Tone
Arm. Plays up to twelve records.
Changes records in 3 seconds
- for Group with third highest
number of ballots entered.

Just Write Your Scorecast for these Games!

Social scientists

MICHIGAN vs. OREGON
IOWA vs. INDIANA
NORTHWESTERN vs. PURDUE

It's Easy! It's Fun!
Here's All You Do!
Write your scorecast of the scores for the three
games listed above on a PHILIP MORRIS
wrapper and drop in Ballot Box.
Enter as many as you wish, but each ballot must
be on a separate PHILIP MORRIS wrapper.
IMPORTANT: List your Name, Address, and

agree Jahtzen sweaters
make the perfect match...
especially in '48 with exclusive
coordinated college colors.
New, too, are the sensational
fabrics, including Lacestitch ... the
tweedy Homespun shot with
Lurex, the exciting metallic yarn...
Feather Fleece...and full
fashioned Angoras and Chinese
Cashmeres for women;

(Hers) "MY PET"
In Feather Fleece
Sizes 32-40
$6.95

Boxes will be cleared Friday, 7 P.M., each
week. List of winners will be posted at re-
demnption points.
Don't Wait! Start Now!
Here's Where You'll Find Your Ballot Boxesl
Watch your college paper for
names and locations of stores

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