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September 30, 1948 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-09-30

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEYM

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PAGE SEVE~*

F,.,

Co-op Houses Celebrate 16 Successful Years

~~2t&ceic

Celebrating their sixteenth year
on campus this fall, co-op houses
have grown steadily from an am-
bitious experiment in democratic
living to the largest student-own-
ed housing organization at the
University.
Campus Co-op houses, like other
consumer cooperatives throughout
the world, operate on principles
developed at Rochdale, England,
over a century ago. They provide
for consumer ownership, non-pri-
fit operation, neutrality in politi-
cal and religious controversy, and
complete democratic control on
the "one member, one vote" prin-
ciple. In addition, campus co-ops
particularly emphasize inter-rac-
ial living and division of work
among members.
THE FIRST student housing co-
op in the nation had its inception
here in 1932, when six men were
faced with the alternative of either
lowering their expenses or drop-
ping out of school. Living in the
basement of Rev. H. L. Pickerill,
a local minister, they found that
by dividing the cost of rent, food
and supplies among themselves,
they could live for $2.00 a week.
Expending rapidly, Michigan
House, as it was called, soon had a
home of its own. Other students
joined in the plan, and beforethe
war, co-op members were renting
13 buildings, housing nearly 200
students. They discovered that not
only were the Rochdale Principles
economically sound, but the dem-
ocratic living they engendered had
a peculiarly strong ideological
appeal of its own.
* * *
AFTER repeated set-backs dur-
ing the war, co-ops have seen a new
post-war development on a firmer
basis, since houses now are owned,
rather than rented, and are bound
together under a unified budget.
With the purchase of John M.
Nakamura House this summer, the
Inter-Cooperative Council will in-
clude more than 250 members and
operate six houses, three for men
and three for women.
All members belong to the In-
ter-Cooperative Council, which
serves as coordinating group, the
corporation through which the
houses do business. A 25-man
board of directors meets every two
weeks to formulate long-range
policy and thrash out immediate
problems, but all its decisions are
subject to the approval of the en-
tire membership.
CO-OPERS are also members ofI
the Midwest Federation of Campus
Cooperatives, which has its head-
quarters on campus, and the
North American Student Coopera-
tive League. The latter organiza-
tion was founded two years ago to
answer the growing demand for
some kind of coordinating group
for the more than 50,000 members

of student co-ops on campuses
throughout the nation.
Despite their remarkable
growth, campus co-ops continue to
operate on much the same basis
as the original Michigan House.
Costs are still less than half those
of comparable non-co-op houses.
In each house, a president, house
manager, accountant, one or two
purchasers, and other officers are
elected by the members. Members
share equitably in house work and
do extra work on committees and
special jobs on a volunteer basis.
Frequent house meetings help to
give each member a say in the
running of his house.
* * *
GROUP purchasing in quantity
is a primary factor in reducing
costs. Produce and canned goods
are purchased in conjunction with
the Ann Arbor Cooperative So-
ciety, and meat is purchased at
wholesale directly from the pack-

ers and frozen until needed by the
houses.
Apart from the purely func-
tional aspects of co-op life, there
is a welding together of the entire
group through a series of social
and educational programs. Prom-
inent campus speakers are invited
to meetings at which various ques-
tions are discussed. The atmos-
phere at these meetings, which are
nearly always open to the public,
is informal, and speakers are in-
vited to discuss their topics on a
personal, give - and - take level.
Dances, picnics, exchange dinners
and other events are frequently
arranged by the social committee,
and here, too, an atmosphere of
informality is generally the rule.
* * *
CO-OPS take pride in the fact
that racial or religious bias is
completely absent among their
members. They feel that co-ops
are a living, growing example to

other campus groups that democ-
racy not only works, but works
better than racial and religious
bigotry.
When a new student applies for
membership either as a boarder
or a roomer in co-ops, the person-
al committee judges him solely on
his merits as an individual. The
criterion for admittance is the
newcomer's ability to adjust him-
self to, and to add to the efficiency
of, the organization. The success-
ful co-oper quickly gains an insight
into the particular problems rep-
resented by the members of dif-
ferent groups in his house, from
which there arises a new under-
standing of -human values, one
which can be carried forth into
the world. In that manner co-ops
on campus fulfill a definitely
ideological function.
* * *
COOPERATIVES do not identify

themselves with political parties
as such, but they do foster a liber-
al spirit and encourage their mem-
bers to take stands on the basic
issues of the day. Consequently,
according to a recent study, co-
opers are more active in the vari-
ous political groups on campus
than any other similar group of
students.
The Inter-Cooperative Council
is basically an independent organ-
ization. It is completely owned and
controlled by its student mem-
bers. It is unlike any other group
on campus. By buying or renting
its houses, the ICC establishes an
atmosphere of responsibility, of
belonging. The occupants know
that what they have has been
handed down to them by their pre-
decessors. They come to feel their
obligation to leave as good or bet-
ter a set-up to the succeeding
group of co-opers.
CLASSICS
ARROW
FORD SHIRTS
$3.95
ROW TIES FROM $1

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AT 20 UNIVERSITIES
SENIORS CHOOSE PARKER

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PARKER SCORES FIRST

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WITH LETTERMEN

WITH CLASS OF
IT'S PARKER' 3
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CAMPUS

iFFICERS
3 TO I

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CO-EDS PREFER PARKER
NEXT 3 MAKES COMBIN

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ARROW GORDON OXFORD SHIRTS
ARE FAVORITES OF COLLEGE MEIN

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Pa4re

5'

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world's most wanted pen

"BROCKLEY"

"FENWAY"

For the first time since before the war, Arrow is offering a
wide selection of white, solid color and striped oxfords in
several collar models especially designed for college men.
Only Arrow shirts have the famous Arrow collar, Mitoga
shaped-to-fit body and Sanforized label, assurance of les:
than 1 % shrinkage. Arrow ties-$1 to $2.50.
A R R OFW

FOR YEARS smart college dressers have preferred
Arrow shirts. Once again we have a fine selection
of Arrow Gordon oxfords in white and solid colors
and several collar styles.
ARROW University styled ties from $1.

An impartial survey at 20 leading universities
shows Parker is preferred by campus leaders.
Senior men and women, senior athletes and class
officers-all have voted Parker top choice.
You'll find that you seem to think better-work
faster with the sleek "51". The precision balance
guards against fatigue. You feel like writing! The
51's exclusive alloy point starts instantly-glides
with satin-smoothness. And you never need a

blotter! This pen writes dry with new Super-
chrome-the ink created for the "51" alone.
As a sound investment towards a successful
school year, choose Parker "51" .. . the world's
most-wanted pen. Pens, including new demi-size,
$12.50 and up. Sets, $18.75 to $80.00. Choice of
colors, custom points. The Parker Pen Com-
pany, Janesville, Wis., U. S. A.; Toronto, Can.

$25 CASH GIVEN AWAY-for interesting, true stories about Parker "51" Pens.
Base it on your own experience-or relate the experience of some friend. $25.00
for each story used. Just report the facts. Stories are judged on facts alone.
All letters become our property-cannot be returned. Address : The Parker Pen
Company, Dept. S-47, Janesville, Wisconsin.

State
Street

t
r -
NINCE 1848, .,

at
Liberty

CO0R1 949 RY THE
PAKER PEN COMPANY

THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY SAVINGS
Sept. 30th and Oct. 1st and 2nd

SH
UNDERWEAR *

IRTS and
HANDKERCHIEFS

TIES
0 SPORTS SHIRTS

- FOR ARROW SHIRTS

235
South State
CANDI
SALE!

MARSHALL'S

State Theatre
Next to US

Yr

4 days

Pound Box
Chocolate Covered
CHERRIES
$1.00 Value
69c

Pound of Terry's
Chocolate Covered
THIN-MINTS
$1.00 Value
69c
HALLOWE'EN
KISSES
14 oz. Bag 50c Value
29c

l

Popular Brand
Cigarettes
$1.69
Carton
Luckies, Camels,
Chesterfields, Old Gold,
Phillip- Morris, and
many others!
Thursday Only
Sept. 30th
50 Pads
MATCHES
9c
Nylon
Hand Brushes
29c

Yes, you have just four more days to
make your picture appointment for the
1949 MICHIGANENSIAN

DRUG
SAVINGS!
ALARM
CLOCKS
$1.98

Wooden
Shower Clogs
59c
and up
Nylon
Hair Brushes
69c
We sell loads of
REVLON
and
MAX FACTOR
25c
TOOTH BRUSH
HOLDERS
9c

hl

We also stock
WHITMAN'S
and
GILBERTS'
CANDIES
35c
Soap Boxes
9c

Stop at the Ensian business office any afternoon this week

from

2

to 5.

Get your picture, name, home town and

ELECTRIC
IRONS
Reg. 9.95
$5.95

l

degree in the official University yearbook.
Phone 2-6482 for information

I

Reg. Oc
ASH
TRAYS
6 for 29c

i

Stainless Steel
WATC H
BANDS
Reg. $1.25 Value
69c -4

4

"Properly Chilled"
BEER
"ANl Us"

I I

I IHII

. ,

II

-- t I

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