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September 26, 1948 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-09-26

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'AGE TW

,"HE MICHIGAN DAILY-

SUNDAY, SEPTET ZMER 26, 1948

~1

?AG1~ TW~ ~UN~DAY, SEPTE1~~RER 26, 194S

RADIO SINGER:
Eileen Farrell Will Appear
In Opening Choral Concert

Eileen Farrell, young Irish-
American soprano, will make her
first Ann Arbor appearance in the
opening concert of the 1948 Choral
Union Series, October 6.
Well known to radio audiences,
Miss Farrell was hailed as the
Muench Will
Direct French
Orchestra Here
Charles Muench, renowned in
this country as a guest conductor,
will soon become even better
known to American concert-goers
when he takes over the permanent
leadership of the Boston Sym-
phony Orchestra next fall.
Muench will direct the French
National Orchestra in its appear-
ance at Hill Auditorium Oct. 25
as part of the regular Choral Un-
ion Series. He has conducted the
Chicago, Cleveland, Los Angeles,
Cincinnati and Minneapolis or-
chestras in previous appearances
in the United States.
Born in Strasburg in 1891, the
distinguished PVrench conductor
was destined for a musical career
from the first. His father was or-
ganist in Strasburg, professor of
its Conservatory and founder of
the choir of St. Guillaume.
Muench studied the violin at
the Paris Conservatory and in
1919 was appointed professor of
violin at the Conservatory and
concertmaster of the orchestra in
his native city.
After a conductorial apprentice-
ship at the Gewendhaus in Leip-
zig, he made his official debut as
a conductor in 1932 in Paris. In
1935 Muench was appointed head
of the Orchestre de la Societe
Philharmonique de Paris, and
three years later was named mu-
sical directoreof the Orchestra du
Conservatoire.
Devoted to the championship of
French music, Muench has re-
ceived the Chevalier of the Legion
of Honor for his services. He was
French representative at the In-
ternational Festivals in Prague,
directed many concerts in Pales-
tine and Egypt, and made him
first visit to South America short-
ly after the war.

Columbia Broadcasting System's
"find of the year" by the New
York Times in 1941. She has
starred on nationwide programs
such as the "Prudential Family
Hour," the "American Melody
Hour," "Pause That Refreshes"
and many special broadcasts.
* * *
MISS FARRELL WAS born in
Connecticut, but boasts of her
Gaelic ancestry. She claims she
was singing Irish ballads before
she learned her ABCs. Her par-
ents, known in vaudeville as "The
O'Farrells" provided a colorful
musical background to her talents.
Even after they gave up their pro-
fessional work, Mrs. Farrell or-
ganized choral groups and taught
singing at home.
Miss Farrell was almost lost to
the musical world when she decid-
ed to sing only for pleasure and
take up the visual arts as her
profession. However, after a brief
session at art school she decided
on music.
** *
AFTER ACHIEVING rapid suc-
cess in radio work, Miss Farrell
is making her first expanded con-
cert tour this season. Always am-
bitious, she is now looking forward
to work in opera-she :ays,
though, she needs more maturity
before she will feel capable enough
to "tackle" Wagner.
Besides her classical repertoire,
Miss Farrell is at home in calypso
and boogie. She has appeared with
Frank Sinatra as a popular singer,
and with orchestra leader Ray-
mond Scott under the pseudonym
of "Dimples Lunceford."
Miss Farrell has also success-
fully mixed motherhood with her
career and has said that her only

BURTON TOWER-The home of the University Musical Society,
Burton Tower was constructed as a memorial to President Marion
Burton. Percival Price, University Carilloneur gives carillon con-
certs during the school year.
TOP-R AN KING PIANIST:
Rudolf Serumn Programmed
For Extra Concert Series

regret concerning
is that she must
month son.
Neveu Picks
As Favorite1

her concert tour
leave her nine-
Europeans
Authors

Rudolf Serkin, who has been
called one of the top-ranking
pianists of the day by critics, will
appear in his first performance
here Dec. 3 in the extra concert
series.
He was born in Eger, Bohemia, 1
of Russian parents. His father, a
basso, -was forced to abandon his
career as a singer and become a
merchant to support his family
but was determined that his tal-
entpd son should have the oppor -
tunity to study music.
ALTHOUGH SERKIN could
play the piano well at the age
of four his father felt that his
talent should not be exploited and
he was taken to Vienna for study.
When he made his debut at 12
with the Vienna Symphony Or-
chestra offers for concert tours
poured in but his parents and
teacher, who felt he was still too

young for a tour, encouraged him
to continue his studies under Ar-
nold Schoenberg.
A turning point in his career
came at 17 when he met Adolf
Busch, the noted violinist. Serkin
went to live with the Busch family
and gave a series of sonata re-
citals with him.
AFTER HITLER came to power
the family moved to Switzerland
where Serkin married Irene Busch,
the violinist's daughter. When the
war broke out they came to the
United States to live.
He first played in this country
at the Coolidge Festival in Wash-
ington, but his debut as solo pian-
ist did not come until Toscanini
chose him as soloist in 1936 with
the New York Philharmonic. He
was an outstanding success and
recived an ovaion such as had
;endo been seen at Carnegie Hall.

Busch Leads
Chicago .Group
Here in March
Orchestra Is Third
Oldest in America
The Chicago Symphony Orches-
tra, under the direction of Fritz
Busch, guest conductor, will per-
form here on March 27 at Hill
Auditorium in the 1948-49 Choral
Union Concert Series.
Familiar to music-lovers every-
where through their regular Wed-
nesday evening radio concerts, the
Symphony has iong been in the
forefront of the nation's major
orchestras.
FOUNDED IN 1891 by the late
Theodore Thomas, the orchestra
is the third oldest in America. It
has numbered among its condue-
tors Thomas, Frederick Stock.
Desire Defauw and Artur Rod-
zinski.
During its 57 years of contin-
uous existence, the Symphony has
branched out into several fields of
activity in the line of "public serv-
ice." In addition to its regular
subscription concerts, the orches-
tra is noted for its Saturday eve-
ning "pop" concerts, which fea-
ture good music popular in the
sense of giving pleasure to both
those with and without a musical
education.
The Orchestra's Young People's
Concerts were an experiment of
the season 1919-20 as Children's
Concerts, meeting with instant
success. Adults are admitted to
these concerts only when acting
as escorts to children. Children's
concerts have since been widely
adopted by other major orches-
tras.
* * *
THE CHICAGO ORCHESTRAL
Association also maintains the
Civic Orchestra.asa training or-
ganization for future symphony
players.The Civic Orchestra, also
an original idea with the Chicago
Symphony, is the only institution
of its kind maintained by a major
orchestra.
Players who received their "fin-
ishing" with the Civic are now
members of major orchestras from
coast to coast, and include upward
of 60 members of the Chicago
Symphony.
Superstitions
GuideViolinist
Violinist Nathan Milstein, who
will appear here in the Choral
Union series, is not only a great
musician, but exhibits stellar orig-
inality in his pet superstitions.
While Milstein is a high-paid
artist, he often performs in worn
shirts. The reason for this is his
belief that when he gives a par-
ticularly satisfactory concert, he
should wear the shirt he wore
during the program at all subse-
quent concerts till it is worn to
a shred.
Milstein never has his fortune
told, since unpleasant predictions
make him uncomfortable. He
would rather act on his own the-
ories, such as leaving his room in
order before every concert-his
superstition being that a disor-
derly room will cause a bad
concert.

FIRST TRY AT 'MESSIAH':
Choral Union Formed 69 Years Ago

'l

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
Calendar of 26 Concerts

4

EILEEN FARRELL, Soprano. . .
MARIAN ANDERSON, Contralto . . .
F'RENCH NATIONAL ORCHESTRA. .

Wed., Oct.

6, 8:30

Thurs., Oct. 14, 8:30
Mon., Oct. 25, 8:30

CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA . . . . . Sun., Nov. 7, 7:00

1

The history of the Choral: Union
dates from 1879 when singers from
four local church choirs decided
to band together for the purpose
of singing choruses from Handel's
"Messiah."
Its first concert ' took plane in
the Congregational Church,, its
second in the Methodist Church,
and its third in the Presbyterian
Church. Later public perform-
ances were given in University
Hall.
Today, with Hill Auditoarium
filled to capacity for two per-
fermances of the "Messiah," the

CINCINNATI SYMPhONY . . .
EZIO PINZA, IBass . . . .

. Mon., Nov. 15, 8:30
Thurs., Nov. 18, 8:30

CLIFFORD CURZON, Pianist . .
RUDOLF SERKIN, Pianist . . .
BOSTON SYMPHONY . . .

. . Sat., Nov.

27, 8:30

. . . Fri., Dec. 3, 8:30

Mon., Dec. 6, 8:30

group has come a long way from
the days when there were more
chorus members than listeners
and the ladies of the various
churches served refreshments
after concerts
Before the first season had end-
ed the group took on larger as-
pects, admitting other competent
singers and expanding its reper-
toire to include other choral
works.
The size of the chorus expanded
to over three hundred voices, and
orchestra or organ accompani-
ment was added. At first local

soloists were employed but later
important artists from Chicago
and New York appeared with the
group.
During the 69 years of its exist-
ence the Choral Union has per-
formed in public almost all of the
great oratorios, and many great
operas adaptable to concert per-
formances.
Membership in the Chorus is
obtained on a try-out basis. Ap-
pointments may be made in the
offices of the University Musical
Society in Burton Tower.

. . .

MESSIAH
MESSIAH

r s " e " e
" "* s " " "

.. . Sat., Dec.

11, 8:30

Sun., Dec. 12, 2:30

Violinist Ginette Neveu can al-
ways find time to read, even in
the midst of a busy schedule.
Her favorite authors are Ro-
main Rolland, Roger Martin de
Gard, and Tolstoi, in that order.
She thinks that the three great-
est works ever penned are "War
and Peace," "Madame Bovary"
and "The Tempest."

GINETTE NEVEU, Violinist.
PAGANINI QUARTET
PAGANINI QUARTET .
PAGANINI QUARTET .. .
VLI)IMIR HOROWITZ, Piani
IIEIFIETZ, Violinist . .
NATHAN MILSTEIN, Violinist
INDIANAPOLIS SYMPHONY

. . . . . Sat., Jan. 8, 8:30
Fri., Jan. 14, 8:30
. . . . . Sat., Jan. 15, 8:30
Sun., Jan. 16, 2:30
1st . . . . Fri., Feb. 11, 8:30
. . . . . Sat., Feb. 19, 8:30
t. Fri., Mar. 4, 8:30
. . . . Sun., Mar. 13, 7:00
. . . . Sun., Mar. 27, 7:00

I rt-I

CHICAGO SYMPHONY

. .

TWO CONCERTS

FIFTY-SIXTH ANNUAL MAY FESTIVAL . . SIX CONCERTS

First Concert.............. ............................... Thurs.,.
Second Concert ................................. Fri.,
Third Concert ..................................Sat.,
Fourth Concert ........................... .. ... Sat.,

May 5,
May 6,
May 7,
May 7,
May 8,
May 8,

8:30
8:30
2:30
8:30
2:30
8:30

SATURDAY,

December

11

8:30 P.M.

Fifth Concert ..................
Sixth Concert ..................
ARS L O NGA

..Sun.,
... ......... Sun.,

REPEAT PERFORMANCE

VITA

BREVI S

SUNDAY,

December 12

2:30 P.M.

. . . .

LESTER McCOY

i

Soloists.

DORIS DOREE
NAN MERRIMAN
FREDERICK JAGEI

. . . Soprano
Contralto

. . .

Tenor
Bass

JOHN GURNEY .

JOHN GURNEY

All four arc dislingutishied
major opera stars
UNIVERSITY
CHORAL UNION
SPECIAL ORCHESTRA
Mary Stubbins - Organ
Lester McCoy - Conductor
TICKETS
(Tax Included)
EITHER CONCERT
70c or5Oc
On Sale Beginning October 1st

NAN MERRIMAN

PRGf4NINI STRING QUARTET
IN THE NINTH ANNUAL
CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
THE PAGANINI STRING QUARTET will re-
turn to Rackham auditorium for the Ninth
SMAnnual Chamber Music Festival, consisting of
three concerts-Fricday and Saturday evenings,
and Sunday afternoon, January 14, 15 and 16.
The three programs will include major quartets
and other ensemble numbers.
HENRI TEMIANKA, Violin
ROBERT COURTE, Viola
GUSTAVE ROSSEELS, Violin
JEAN DE NOCKER, Violoncello
Three CONCERTS in
RACKHAM AUDITORIUM
FRIDAY, 8:30 P.M.
SATURDAY 8:30 P.M.
SUNDAY, 2:30 P.M.
JANUARY 14, 15, 16, 1949
TICKETS (tax incl.) THREE CONCERTS $3.00 and $2.40

11111

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