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January 05, 1949 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-01-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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'feavnv11.J4 A lo~nw'

ILE THE NATION waited for Pres-
ident Truman's address to Congress,
the need for Civil Rights legislation had
popped up like a sore thumb the last weeks
of 1948 to taunt the States Righters and
White supremacists who were waiting to
fight it.
From the bigots stronghold, Mississippi,
came the tragic ease of the man who was
the unknown Negro. David Knight, who
served in the Navy for three years as a
white man, had come back to Mississippi,
married, and settled down, only to come
in contact with that state's laivs against
inter-marriage.
Knight, it seems, and you have to stretch
the imagination to grit this, was the great
grandson of a Negro woman on his grand-
father's plantation. This made him 1/8
Negro, and of course, the Southerner's
couldn't allow him to stay married to his
Indian wife. Knight was sentenced to five
years in prison for his "crime." This, from
the state that keeps telling us that if we
leave them alone they will handle their
own race problem.
But the Southern stronghold isn't the
only example that erept into the news
just before the P resident's speech. Rene-
saw M. Landis 11, in a report for the Na-
Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
are written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only.
NIGHT EDITOR: CRAIG IH. WILSON

- q
tional Commission on Segregation in the
Nation's Capital produced some startling
facts.
A dog cemetery refuses to bury Negroes'
dogs; some theatres bar Negroes from au-
diences but accept them as performers while
the DAR Constitution Hall does the reverse;
the YMCA bars Negroes, the YWCA does
not: white public schools are newer and
only three fourths filled, while Negro ones
are older and so crowded pupils often get
only part time instruction; all hospitals
admitted Negroes 50 years ago, today only
two do; three years ago a Negro woman
gave birth to a child on the sidewalk be-
fore a church-supported hospital which re-
fused her one of its empty beds; George-
town University had a Negro president 70
years ago, then barred Negroes, and now
accepts them in its law school.
In the face of this report and the
Knight trial in Mississippi, the old argu-
ment that time alone would heal the
breach seemed false indeed. At least in
the nation's capital, the situation was
growing progressively worse.
The people had every right to expect leg-
islation from the new Congress to correct
these ills. While we railed at Soviet Russia
for her undemocratic acts, our own back
yard looked dirty., This is the time when
Americans could tell whether the pl atform s
of the major parties had been just that
or really were the basis for the action of
the next few years. It is going to take
the combined and sincere effort of Demo-
crats and Republicans to get the Civil Rial lts
progr am past the Dixiecrats.
-Don McNeil.

(hniunts On,1issioii

THREE OF THE nation's top news services
-the Associated Press, the United Press
and International News Service-recently
chose the "biggest news stories of the year."
Sources of the top news of 1948 ranged
all the way from Harry S. Truman (the
services unaniiopsil ranked the "surpris-
ing underdog" as 1948's No. newsmaker)
to young Prince Charlie of Britain.
But, according to the listings of the men
who dispatch the news to papers all over the
country, one news source -and it used to be
a pretty big one--didn't rate.
Apparently nobody on the three services
thought the UN's actions important enough
to rank with the year's genuine "hot copy."
And they were probably right. The edi-

tors were, after all, concerned only with
judging the news on its merits.
But we kind of hate to see those listings.
Somehow, when a news source like the
oncejpromising UN stops making big news,
it indicates that something is wrong.
It may be in a way consoliog to rernem-
b e that most of I if 48's news was on the
gloomy side--too many crises, wars. insur-
rections.
Maybe 1949 will bring good news to a
world that's sick of opening its morning
paper to find bleak, black headlines.
Maybe the UN can do something to give
the world good news in 1949-and inciden-
tally, regain its reputation as an outstanding
news source. We hope so.
-Mary Stein.

I'D RATHER BE RIGHT:
OyAtHM ,- Ifl8Til
Wy SAIVUL G~RAFTON
SOME DAY SOON colonialism must end.
It must end because it is a stink in the
nostrils of the world. It is especially offen-
sive in our time because the issue in our
time is freedom. If the world issue were
merely h ow t0et rich fast, as it was fifty
years ago, colonialism might not matter.
If the issue were the exploration of the
world, as it was three hundred years ago,
thee, too, colonialism wouldn't matter, But
when leworld issue is freedom and the
rights of man, colonialism cannot persist,
in any forn, gross or refined, crude or
clever.
That is why, I believe, the formation
of the Western Alliance must mean the
end of colonialism. It wasn't intended
to have that effect. But it will have it,
or else the Alliance will collapse. We
cannot indefinitely sustain an alliance for
the rights of man with a Hiolland which
has overrun Indonesia, or with a France
which is using force in Indo-China, or with
a Britain which still seeks by some bril-
liant stroke to prolong the dispersion of
the Jews.
We cannot long sustain such an alliance,
under such conditions, because it makes
even the little boys id the laborers in the
streets of Jogjakarta laugh at our pre-
tensions, and wh en a laborer laughs, some-
body in a boilled shirt is making a whale
of a misia ke.
We have a Truman Doctrine telling
the world what sorts of people and policies
we ea not get along with, and we now
need a new Truman Doctrine which will
spell out what sorts of people and policies
we can get along with. It is not true
that anybody will do so long as he is
against Russia. That was what we thought
in the primitive mood of a year or so
ago. Chiang Kai-shek has fully disproved
this belief for us in the foreign field; he
won't do. Our own elections have dis-.
provedlthe s.ame idea in the domestic
field; the Aiciean people have shown
their belief that one who wants to uphold
democravcy inetls a little positive pro-lib-
eral conent ming-led with his standard
anti-Comnmunist emotions.
This question, of just who is qualified to
save us from Communism, has been burning
beneath the surface of our western life, and
a Netherlands which seeks to stave off to-
talitarianism with one hand, and to conquer
an Asiatic people with the other, is clearly
not qualified.
A Western Alliance built on such contra-
dictions cannot prosper. It will not take
gunfire to defeat it; the laughtlr of puasaits
in the fieis and forests of the east will do.
That is why we must greet the recon-
vening of the Security Council on Thurs-
day with an announcement that we have
cut off Marshall Plan aid to Rolland.
For Mr. Truman not to take this step
will be for him to act as if he did not un-
derstand the many meanings of his own
election, with their elear overtones of lib-
eral questing and progressive aspiration.
It will be as if he will have assigned one
longing to America, and another, and a
lesser one to the people of the world.
We have enjoyed so much our great cry
of this lase year that we stand for the
freedom of the world; we have so deeply
relished our own slogans. But one must
go into these massive planetary disputes
with clean hands. One must pay for the
right to defend this field; one must do
exactly what one says one wants done, by
others and by the world. The one who write
a slogan must be the first to obey it. The
>rice one pays for the right to raise a
motto is to fulfil it.
(Copyright, 1948, Newv York Post Corporation)
It ____ --- ,1____________

FIRST SEiW:8TER
EXAMINATOrN SCHEDULE
UNIVEARSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION ..
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
JANUARY 17-28, 1949
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the
week; for courses having quizzes only, the time of exercise if the
time of the first quiz period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule. Evening,
4 o'clock, 5 o'clock, and "irregular" classes may use any of the
periods marked * provided there is no conflict. A final period
on January 28 is available in case no earlier period can be used.
To avoid misunderstandings and errors., each student should
receive notification from his instructor of the time and place
of his examination. In the College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts, no date of examination may be changed without the
consent of the Examination Committee.

TIME OF EXERCISE

TIME OF EXAMINATION

Geomietr y
Wed., Jan.
Prof. N. H.

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8..................
9..................
1 ..................
................
2... . .. . ... .. .. ..
1. .. . .. .. .. .. .. ..

..........M on.,
..........W ed.,
.. . .. .Fri.,
..........M on.,
..........W ed.,
...........Tues.,
. . . . . . . . . hurs.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

17, 9-12
19, 9-12
21, 9-12
24, 9-12
26, 9-12
25, 2- 5
27, 2- .5
18, 9-12
20, 9-12
22, 9-12
25, 9-12
27, 9-12
26, 2- 5
24, 2- 5

Seminar: 3 p.m.,
5, 3001 Angell Hall.
Anning will speak.

at 8...............
at 9...............
at 10...............
at 11...............
at 1...............
at 2...............
at 3...............

...........Tues.,
...........Thurs.,
...........Sat.,
........... Tues.,
. ............thurs.,
...........W ed.,
.. Mon.,

Irregulars, make=up, etc. ...............*FKt,
SPECIAL PERIODS

Jan, 28, 9-12

Political Science 1
Sociology 51, 54, 90...........
German 1, 2, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 ............
English 1, 2
Psychology 31 .................
Chemistry 1, 3
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 101 ...
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32, 61, 62,
91, 92, 153; Speech 31, 32 .......

. Mon. Jan. 17, 2- 5
.*Tues., Jan. 18, 2- 5
*Wed, Jan. 19, 2- 5
.. '*Thus, .Jan. 20, 2- 5

....... ri.,

OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

!1
(Continued from Page 2)
Botanical Seminar: 4 p.m.,
Wed., Jan. 5, 1139 Natural Science
Bldg. Paper: "Mycological Studies
in Mt. Rainier National Park," by
A. H. Smith. Open meeting.
Chemistry Colloquium: 4:15
p.m., Wed., Jan. 5, 1300 Chemistry
Bldg. Dr. Beth Cook will speak on
"Alternation in Properties and
Polarity of Alkyl Chaines."
Engineering Mechanics Semi-
nar: 4 p.m., Wed., Jan. 5, 101 W.
Engineering Bldg. Mr. E. Q. Smith.
will discuss "Longitudinal Impact
of Prismatical Bars."

Jan. 21, 2- 5
Jan. 22, 2- 5

Botany 1; Zoology 1 ...................'*Sat.,

MATTER OF FACT:
Ott the AirLi

~-y-JOSEPH ALSOP
THE PHENOMENON of the American air
lift to Berlin may be taken as a sort of
parable of the best and worst in American
foreign relations. The air lift itself stands
for the energy, ingenuity and great resour-
ces which have, at least thus far, enabled
us to escape from the tight spots we keep
getting into. But the circumstances that
led to the air supply of Berlin stand equally
well for the somewhat incoherent methods
of policy-making which tend to get us into
these tight spots.
The backgrotind story can and should
be told at last. Briefly, as was reported
in this space last spring, the Soviet block-
ade of Berlin was anticipated by Ameri-
can and British intelligence at least three
months before it was imposed. Yet no
co--ordinated advance pr-eparatifuns for
the blockade were made, either between
the American, British and French govern-
ments, or even between the American pol-
icy-makers in Washington and General
Lucius D. Clay and the other Americans
in charge in Germany.
As soon as the Soviets cut all communi-
cation with Berlin, Clay told Washington lie
was ordering an armed convoy. A train was
actually dispatched, and the American
troops on board were ordered to resist So-
viet interference with the train's progress.
But the young officer in charge lost his
Rep-blica-s' Move
AFTER THE MOST humiliating defeat in
years, Republican forces everywhere
have attempt(ed , anaz jwu what went
wrong.
Probably the closest anver was that
given recently in a int statemeit issued
by the Yoang lieublcan Clubs at lHar-
vard, Massaclusetts Institute of Technol-
ogy, Radcliffe, and Wellesley.
This statemen t declared that the party
can "no longer afford to have congressional
policies of one variety and presidential can-
didates of another."
In addition the group recommended
that a group of party leaders be delegated
as spokesmen for the party. They also
suggested that party leaders meet to set
up clear cut working policies that can
answer the needs of the people.
By offering ideas and asking for action,
these college students have shown that they
<re tired of the old conversatives that have
bogged down t;e Republican party for years.
Moreover, they have demonstrated that they
are willing to carry out their ideas.

nerve when the train was halted and this
first installment of the plan miscarried.
Meanwhile Washington, London and
Paris had begun running around in circles
and barking like dogs. The notion of send-
ing an armed convoy to Berlin was su-
premely repugnant to Paris. London was
far from enthusiastic. And in Washington,
the State Department's Russian experts
made an estimate of the risk of war very
different from that of the men on the
scene in Berlin. Some other expedient
had therefore to be devised.
Thus the air lift was born at the last min-
ute, in an atmosphere of emergency and
confusion and conflict. Having been or-
ganized at the last instant, the air lift was
initially less effective than it should have
been. And thus the political benefits de-
rived from this great showing of American
and British power were initially reduced,
while the situation remained confused for
some time.
The remaining confusion meanwhile con-
tinues to impose its penalties. If the air
lift is to be semi-permanent, it must be
planned on the basis of keeping some sort
of economic life going in Berlin's western
sectors. And this is not yet being done.
The issue will shortly become acute. Ber-
lin's industry has limped along at half
speed thus far by expending local stocks
of raw .materials. These stocks are running
ou t.
Th e committee's chairmian Doctor
Spennrath, of German General Electric,
has meanwhile .just warned Ambassador
Murphy and General Clay that new
measures would have to be taken to meet
the emergency created by exhaustion of
raw material stocks.
The Job moreover can be done. General
William Tunner, commander of "Operation
Vittles," has estimated that by simply re-
placing the 150 assorted British aircraft now
operating into Berlin with the larger ca-
pacity C-54's, the average input can be
raised to 8,000 tons daily. This means de-
liveries to Berlin of nearly 250,000 tons a
month, or enough for all the city's needs.
But this means also a tremendously in-
creased effort to find these aircraft at home
and perhaps some sacrifice to do so. It is
time to begin facing up to this sort of nec-
essity, and planning how to meet it in ad-
vance.
(Copyright, 1948, New York Herald Tribune, Inc.)
RED INK IS expected by Mr. Truman to
show up on the government's books
again for the year that ends next June 30
nnr f.- nr ntp +m )

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School Bulletin Board.
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School Bulletin Board.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual Instruction in Applied Music.
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all
applied xmusie courses (individual instruction) elected for credit
in any unit of the Universily. For tinme and place of examina-
tions, see bulletin board at the School of Music.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School Bulletin Board.
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, College of Engineering
JANUARY 17 TO JANUARY 28, 1949
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week;
for courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time of
the first quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through the
examination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to
such work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between as-
signed examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3209 East Engineering Build-
ing between January 3 and January 8 for instruction. To avoid
misunderstandings and errorseach student should receive noti-
fication from his instructor of the time and place of his appear-
ance in each course during the period January 17 to January 28.
No date of examination may be changed without the con-

English Concentrators, General
Program: Your concentration ad-
viser will see you during the next
two weeks at the times posted on
his office door. A-K, 3216 Angell
Hall; L-Z, 3220 Angell Hall
Concerts
Notice of Change of Time: Af-
ter January 1, all School of Music
concerts and recitals will begin at
8 p.m., instead of 8:30, as in the
past. Afternoon programs will be
given at 4:15, unless otherwise in-
dicated.
Ginette Neveu, distinguished
French violinist, will be presented
in recital by the University Musi-
cal Society in the Choral Union
Series at 8:30 p.m., Jan. 8, Hill
Auditorium.
Miss Neveu will play the follow-
ing program at her Ann Arbor
diebut:
Concerto in G major, No. 3,
Mozart; Chaconne (violin alone),
Bach; Sonata, G major, Op. 30,
No. 3, Beethoven ; Piece en forme
de Habanera, Ravel; Etude in
Thirds, Scriabin; Nocturne et Tar-
entelle, Szymanowski.
Tickets are available at the of-
fice of the University Musical So-
ciety in Burton Memorial Tower;
and will also be on sale at the Hill
Auditorium box office one hour
preceding the concert Saturday
night.
Student Recital: Helene Jarvis,
pianist, will present a program in
partial fulfillment of the require-
ments for the degree of Master of
Music at 8 p.m., Wed., Jan. 5,
Rackham Assembly Hall. A pupil
of Joseph Brinkman, Miss Jarvis
will play Franck's Prelude, Chor-
ale and Fugue, Griffes' Sonata,
and Brahms' Variations and
Fugue on a Theme of Handel. The
public is invited.
Organ Recital: Patricia Ann
Baumgarten, student of organ
under Frederick Marriott, will be
heard in recital at 8 p.m., Thurs.,
Jan. 6, Hill Auditorium. Her pro-
gram will include compositions by
Buxtehude, Bach, Willan, Peeters
and Dupre, and will be open to the
general public. It is played in par-
tial fulfillment of the require-
ments for the degree of Bachelor
of Music.
Events Today
Motion Pictures, auspices of the
Audio-Visual Education Center.
Biology and Zoology: Story of the
Bees, Seashore Oddities (color),
4:10 p.m., Kellogg Auditorium.
Institute of Aeronautical Sci-
ences: Meeting, 7 p.m., Michigan
Union Ballroom.
'Ensian Picture will be retaken.
Movie: "To Design for Living."
Election of officers.

Engineering and Institute of ka-
dio Engineers: Field trip to Unit-
ed States Rubber Company in De-
troit, 1 p.m. Meeting place is the
Engine Arch. Estimated time of
return, 5 p.m. Tickets are avail-
able in 2514 E. Engineering Bldg.
United Nations Council: 4 p.m.,
Michigan League Soda Bar. In-
terested persons invited.
United World Federalists Speak-
ers Bureau: Meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
Michigan Union, Last meeting of
the semester.
I.Z.F.A.: Final session for this
semester's Wednesday Study
Group, 7:45 p.m., Michigan Union.
Topic: "Life in Israel." Next se-
mester's program will be consid-
ered.
Roger Williams Guild: weekly
"chat" and tea, 4:30-6 p.m., Guild
House. Comments will be made on
the U.S.C.C. conference held last
week,
Women of the University Faeul-
ty: Tea, 4-6 p.m., Club room, Room
D, Michigan League.
U. of M. Dames' Book Group:
Meet at 8 p.m., at the home of
Mrs. Philbrick, 2107 Hill St. Mrs.
Kent Winsemius will review
"House Divided," by Williams, and
Mrs. Lawrence Anderson will do
"Heart of the Matter," by Greene.
Call Mrs. Stanley Thayer for
transportation,
Agenda for the Student Legis-
lature Meeting: 7:30' p.m., Grand
Rapids Room, Michigan League.
Cabinet Report: 1. Phoenix
Project report.
Old Business: 1. Election of Leg-
islature Cabinet.
Culture & Education Commit-
tee: semester report.
Campus Action Committee: se-
mester report.
Varsity Committee: semester re-
port.
Social Committee: semester re-
port.
NSA Committee: semester re-
port.
Public Relations Committee: se-
mester report.
Coming Events
Movie to be presented by Phi
Lambda Upsilon for chemists and
chemical engineers and all others
interested, 4:15 p.m., Thurs., Jan.
6, 1400Chemistry Bldg. Film:
"The Modest Miracle (The Story
of Vitamin B)."
Varsity Debate: Next debate
meeting, Wed., Feb. 9. A list of all
team members and their phone
numbers will be posted in 4203
Angell Hall, Thurs., Jan. 6. De-
baters may themselves arrange
interim practice debates before
the next February series. Please
register debates with Mr. Nadeau
in 3208 Angell Hall, so that rooms
and critiques may be arranged.
International Center weekly tea
(Continued on Page 6)

Fifty-N intb Year

Looking Back

sent of the Classification Committee.
TIME OF CLASS
Monday (at 8.............

TIME OF EXAMINATION
0

. .mon.,

FIFTY YEARS AGO TODAY:
A masked carnival was announced for
Tirsday nigh t a t Weinberg's skating rink.
Everybody was invited to come, bring his
mask and "ex epe t a hot time."
Tfhiat very samne evening University Pres-
ident Angell was scheduled to speak on 'The
Eastern Question" ii a YMCA lecture course
inl Detroit.
Alartm clocks were advertised --thew - at a
dollar.
FOR TY YEARS A GO TODAY:
ieturinigr i from Cinistmas vacation, the
University was surprised to learn that the
football team would not play Vanderbilt
next fall as it had the past four. Financial
reasons were blamed.
THIRTY YEARS AGO TODAY:
The first World War over, men were ex-
pected to observe the University's hallowed
freshman traditions. To remind students
just what they were, The Daily ran a
summary of them.
Freshmen were told to wear their caps or
toques at all times except Sundays . . . and
warned not to hide them. They were told
not to smoke a pipe on the campus . . .
they would get numeral pipes when they
were juniors.
Sitting on senior engineer benches was
verboten . . . a man of a hIigher class was
always to precede a freshman through a
door.

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

9............
10............
11............
1............
2. .........
3............

(at. 8.
(at 9.
(ati 10.
(at 11.
(at 1.
(at 2.
(at 3.

............
............
............
............

.......W ed.,
........Fri.,
.......Mon.,
.......W ed.,
....... Tues.,
.......Thurs.,
... . T res.,
..Thurs.,
.. S.. t... .,
.. .. . I'ces.,
.......Thurs.,
.......W ed.,
.......Mon.,
...Mon.,
..*Tues.,
*Wed.,
Thui.,
... . . . iat,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Janl.

17,
19,
21,
24,
26,
25,
27,
18,
20,
22,
25,
27,
26,
24,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5

Delta
Business
meeting,

Sigma Pi, Professional
Fraternity: Business
8 p.m., Chapter House.

Ch.-Met. 1; M.P. 3, M.P. 4 .........
E.M. 1, 2; C.E. 22; Germ.; Span.....
Eng. 11; Draw. 3; M.E. 135;
Surv. 1, 2...................
Chem. 1, 3; e. 53, 54, 101.......
Draw. 2; E.E. 5; French..........
Draw. 1; M.E. 13; Phys. 45,
M .E. 136 .......................

Jan. 17, 2- 5
Jan. 18, 2- 5

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

19,
20,
21,

2-
2-
2-

5
5
5

Cllr Ski Club: Meeting, 7:30
p.m., Rm. 3R, Michigan Union.
Flying Club: Open meeting, 7:30
p.m., 1042 E. Engineering Bldg.
Pay up January accounts to avoid
the penalty.
Modern Poetry Club: 7:30 p.m.,
Russian Tea Room, Michigan
League. Discussion , of Randall
Jarrell's Poetry.
Sociedad Hispanica: Final meet-
ing of the fall semester, 8 p.m.,
Hussey Room, Michigan League.
Mr. Pablo Sacio Arriz will speak
informally on "El problema del
indio en el Peru." Discussion will
follow.

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American Institute

of Electrical

BARNABY

All we want, you see, is a moderate
snowfall. So he can use his sled-
\ if

Those Weather Bureaucrats run everything.
Old Jack Frost doesn't count anymore. Just
window dressing, you might say. Yes, I just
na sloainna anmarinn on windows-In

Key West or someplace.Sit in the sun-
He can't [Nonsense. He

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