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January 05, 1949 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-01-05

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WEI) PAT, JANUATtY 5, 1949

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THE . MICHIGA&N,-D-ALL).

mrAGE THRTI F

WED~E~At 3A~UAR~J~ 1~) TAL*Wj TUKJ~

Big Ten Improves National Cage Rank

McMillan Paces Wolverines
For Hockey Scoring Honors

Post Impressive Record
In Non-League Contests
Minnesota Boasts Undefeated Campaign;
Five Teams Have Suffered One Setback

Michigan's hockey fans will not
be too surprised to hear that re-
liable Gordy McMillan is once
again pacing the Wolverine puck-
men in scoring.
Figures compiled for the first
ten games reveal that the flashy
redhead center has amassed 24
points on 8 goals and 16 assists.
WITH THIS tremendous start,
McMillan appears bent on estab-
lishing a Michigan scoring record
far out of the reach of any future
Maize and Blue iceman.
Not too far behind McMillan
is the little speedster, Wally
Gacek. Wally has slammed in
11 goals and has assisted on 8
others.
Strung out behind the leaders
are Gil Burford with 17 points,
and Wally Grant, Captain Al Ren-
Hockey tickets will be on sale
today, tomorrow and Friday at
the Athletic Administration
Building for the games with
Queens University Friday, and
Saturday nights. Remaining
tickets will be sold at the coli-
seum before the contests Fri-
day and Saturday.
frew, and Neil Celley with 16
points. Renfrew has collected the
most goals on the squad with 12
markers to his credit.
* * *
COLLECTIVELY the Wolver-
ines have garnered 64 goals for an
impressive 6.4 average in the ten
contests played to date.
Bowl ficials
Want Big Nitne
King Annually11
PALM SPRINGS, Calif., Jan. 4
-(WP)--Spokesman for the Pasa-
Jlena Tournament of Roses were
reported today to have repeated a
plea that the Big Nine-Pacific
Coast Conference Rose Bowl pact
be changed to permit the Midwest-
ern champions to appear in the
Bowl regardless of previous en-
gagements there.
The tournament's football com-
mittee, headed by Lathrop Leish-
man, huddled with the confer-
ence's Rose Bowl committee at the
annual winter meeting of the coast
directors.
Under the present setup, no Big
Nine team can pay a return visit
to Pasadena within a span of
three years, Michigan, for in-
stance, played at Pasadena in the
1948 game but could not return
this year, even though it was
again the Big Nine champion.

Five Wolverine skaters have
performed the "Hat Trick" with
Wally Gacek leading in this de-
partment with two. Others who
have accomplished this feat are
Neil Celley, Gil Burford, Al
Renfrew, and Gordy McMillan.
On the defensive side of the
ledger, the NCAA champions have
been nicked for an average of 2.4
goals per game. Much of the
credit for this record must be
given to the stellar defensive trio
of Connie Hill, Dick Starrak, and
Ross Smith along with Goalie
Jack McDonald.
Vic Heyliger2s high - geared
pucksters have not been beaten in
their last 19 games. Their last
defeat was a 5-4 licking at the
hands of the Minnesota Gophers
last February 14.
Away from home the Maize
and Blue icemen have not been
beaten since March 1, 1947 when
the Windsor Spitfires edged them
6-5. The consecutive "away" game
unbeaten streak has now reached
15.

Long recognized as the tough-
est football conference in the na-
tion, the Big- Nine's basketball
teams are rapidly giving it the
stature of one of the most power-
ful basketball loops.
Last. year sav them take 49
games in 71 starts against non-
Conference opponents for a re-
spectable average of .690.
The best showings were made
by Illinois (8-0), Iowa (7-0) and
Indiana (7-1).
This year, Big Nine teams have
fared even better against non-
Conference foes, winning 55 games
and losing only 15 for a .786 aver-
age.
Only one quintet, Minnesota, has
managed to go through the cam-
paign so far without a beating.
The Gophers have taken eight
straight contests, spearheaded by
All-Conference center Jim Mc-

GORDON McMILLAN
... Leads 'M' Puckmen

Wolverine Tankmen Face Nation' s Best

Intyre and soph forward "Whitey"
Skoog.
But five outfits have lost only
one game to opponents. They
include Illinois and Indiana
(8-1), Michigan (7-1), Iowa
(6-1) and Ohio State (5-1).
Of the other three teams, both
Purdue and Wisconsin have win-
ning averages against non-Con-
_SPO IITS
ROG GOELZ, Night Editor
ference opponents, while North-
western is the only squad with a
less than even break.
Offensively Illinois is picking
up where it left off last year.
TheIlilini topppd all Con-
ference teams in scoring, and
have a wide margin over Iltdi-
ana, the nearest rival.
In nine games each Illinois has
found the mark for 651 points, a
72.3 point per game average, while
the Hoosiers 497 gives them a 55.2
average.
Minnesota's undefeated Gophers
have dropped in 479 points in
eight starts for a 57.4 mark.
As far as the points per game
go, Ohio State and Iowa both
have better averages than In-
diana and the Minnesotans.
In defense it's Michigan's cham-
pion Wolverines again, but there's
a lot of pressure from Iowa, Pur-
due, Minnesota and Wisconsin.
The Wolverines' 40.9 point mark
barely shades the 41.4 and 42.3
averages of Iowa and Purdue.

Name Indians
Team of Year
In APPoll
NEW YORK-(A )-The World
Champion Cleveland Indians were
voted the nation's outstanding
team of 1948 in the annual poll
of sports writers by the Associated
Press.
Michigan's powerhouse foot-
ball team, which finished No. 1
in the Associated Press' year-end
poll, gained runnerup honors
with 122 points. The Wolver-
ines drew down 17 first place
votes, 27 seconds and 17 thirds.
The U. S. Olympic Squad fin-
ished third with 86 points. Uncle
Sam's athletes, who won the over-
all Olympic Championship in Eu-
rope last August, received 24 first
place nominations, four seconds
and six thirds.
Cleveland's mighty Browns, All-
America Conference football
champions for three consecutive
years, were fourth with 67 points.
They were followed by Kentucky's
basketball team, 43; the Phillips
Oilers cage squad, 29; and the
Notre Dame eleven, 11, in that or-
der.
Did you know that the Mich-
igan Wolverines have won more
Western Conference titles than
any other Big Nine school, the
total now running over 100?

By BEV BUSSEY
Sports Feature Editor
When time comes to appraise
the '48 showings of the Michigan
athletes, local sports fans cer-
tainly have no complaints to
make.
Their Wolverines howled. They
clawed through each campaign,
and came out with the lion's share
of the spoils, which in heartwarm-
ing figures, means: three na-'
tional titles, three and a half Big
Ten team championships, a
"mythical" Conference crown, and
two individual Big Ten crowns.
* * *
THE NATIONAL ruling trium-
verate include King Bennie's foot-
ball warriors, Vic Heyliger's
hockey charges, and father Mann's
swimmers.
After two years of plugging
away on fundamentals and a
deliberate brand of ball, the
gangling basketball team devel-
oped into a polished, self-as-
sured unit. It came up with the
first Big Ten cage title since

they shared the penthouse with
Wisconsin in '29.
In spring competition, the ten-
nis squad bowed to Northwestern
in the Big Ten finals. But Andy
Paton stroked his way to the sin-
gles title, and later joined Captain
Bill Mikulich to take the Confer-
ence doubles crown.
* * *
THAT PUZZLING "half" title
belongs to the baseball squad
which split the prize with Illinois.
With an 8-2 record, the Wolverines
swept the Northwestern series,
while the Illini lost their final
game to OSU.
The remaining Conference
jackpots were hit by the swim-
ming and football teams. It was
squad strength that worked like
a strong kick in favor of the
Wolverine tanksters' victory over
the menacing Buckeyes. As for
the gridders, the 23 game win
streak speaks for itself.
The "mythical" crown went to
he hockey squad which decisively
defeated its only Big Ten oppo-
nent, Minnesota.

Three National Titles
Go to Michigan in 1948

III I

Ii-

.I

If Michigan's championship
swimmers drop their Big Nine and
NCAA titles next spring it won't
be because they weren't ready for
the stiff competition.
For the Wolverines are about to
embark on a schedule of dual
meets that will pit them against
a good share of the nation's finest
tankmen.
TIlE NATATORS open their
schedule at Purdue on Jan. 15
and will find themselves up
against lanky Keith Carter, Big
Nine champion in the 50-yd. free-
style and 200-yd. breaststroke,
holder of the world's record in the
100-yd. breaststroke and runner-
up in the Olympic breaststroke
event.
On Feb. 9 LaSalle College will
come to Ann Arbor sporting the
man who is probably the best
known swimmer in America to-
day. lie is, of course, Joe Ver-
deur the peerless breaststroker
who will be returning to the
pool in which he set his amaz-'
ing world record time of 2:14.7
in the 240-yd. breaststroke last
spring.
Verdeur, who was so afraid of
water that he had to be pushed in
by friends the first time he en-
tered a pool also numbers the
Olympic breaststroke champion-
ship and the Swimmer-of-the-

Year awards among
achievements.
* * *

his 1948

MICHIGAN STATE will

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to town three days later bring-
ing two more Olympic stars with
them in the persons of freestyler
Georgie Hoogerhyde and back-
stroker Howie Patterson.
Hoogerhyde, one of the na-
tion's finest middle-distance
men, was named to the All-
American Collegiate swimming
team in the 100 and 220-yd, free-
style events last season.
Another Olympic ompnetitor
will be here on Feb. 19 when Bill
Heusner will lead his Northwest-
ern teammates into actionragainst
the Wolverines. Heusner holds
the NCAA title in the 1500-meter
freestyle and was near the top in
the 440 and 220 events.
HAVE-NOT Minnesota will be
here on Feb. 21 boasting only Don
Benson, a good freestyler, as a
genuine star but on Feb. 26 Ohio
State will move into Ann Arbor
for what undoubtedly will be the
top dual meet of the collegiate
season.
The mighty Buckeyes, rated
with Michigan at the top of the
college list, will be captained by
little Halo Hirose who showed
signs of slipping last year but
who is rated by Coach Mike
Peppe as the best dash man he
has ever tutored.
Bill Smith who won the Olym-
pic 400-meter freestyle event and
who must be ranked among the
finest competitors of all time is
back at Columbus, as is Bruce
Harlan, another Olympic cham-
pion, who will be favored to take
every diving title available this
Black Never
To Pitch Again
For Cleveland
CLEVELAND, Jan. 4 -(/') -
Tough luck swatted Don Black
another hard one today with a re-
mark by Bill Veck that he'l never
pitch agiUn for th' aIWorld Cham-
pion Civeland Indians.
Black himself couldn't be local,-
ed, but the Tribe's President,
Veeck, made his future with the
Indians unmistakably clear with
these words in conversation with
a reporter:
"If he is deterined to try it
again, I won'tsadidin his wy.
I'll give him his release, but I
would not accept the responsibil-
ity of Don trying to pitch again."
That was all Veeck would say.
But the words came as Black was
recovering from a second long
siege in the hospital with a serious
brain ailment that started back on
the Indians' diamond Sept. 13.
On that day, Black fell head-
long at the plate during a game
with the St. Louis Browns. For
weeks after that, he lay in the
hospital near death. Then, after
a brief spell outside, he returned
for an operation to eliminate re-
curring severe headaches and
managed to get out in time for
Christmas at home with his
daughters.

season now that his sidekick Mil-
ler Anderson has graduated.
Another Buckeye who will come
in for considerable attention this
season is Bunny Nakama, younger
brother of the great Keo. Bunny is
a middle distance man who won
the NAAU outdoor one mile free-
style event way back in 1940.
After that the Wolverines travel
to Purdue to defend their Western
Conference title on March 3, 4 and
i5 and the following week they go
dto Iowato meet a good Hawkeye
team led by Wally Ris.
Ris won his Olympic 100-meter
freestyle, handing France's high-
ly touted Alex Jany the defeat
which supposedly broke the young
Frenchman's spirit and forced
him to withdraw from the rest of
the Olympic competition.

I!

-

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BARRISTER:

Keen Begins 21st Year
As 'MVI' Wrestling Mentor

SEMIANNUAL CLEARANCE
Beginning Monday at 9 AM.
Here is your chance to save real money,.
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Clifford Keen is a member in
good standing of the Michigan
Bar, and 150 pound football coach
at Michigan. "In addition to his
other duties," Coach Keen is be-
ginning his 21st year as top men-
tor of the Wolverine matmen.
Discounting years 1942-44, Keen
has continuously supervised wres-
tling activities here since 1925.
Having graduated from Oklahoma
A. & M. in 1924, the coach was
literally fresh out of college when
he joined wrestling enthusiasts
scattered throughout the nation
who were selling the skeptics their
new body-building tonic.
* * *
THlE PROMOTION - MINDED
coaches during the twenties pub-
licized their sport by staging ex-
hibition matches during inter -
missions of the "accepted" com-
petitive contests. Wrestling at
Michigan commenced in 1922 by
Coach Thorn.
Being somewhat of an ath-
lete in his own right, the coach
knows a few things about the
grappling game. During Keen's
undergraduate days at Okla-
homa A. & M., he copped the
Southwest Conference Cham-
pionship three consecutive years
plus picking up a National Title
at 158 pounds.
The interim period between Ok-
lahoma and Michigan saw Keen
pilot the Frederick, Oklahoma,
It was erroneously reported
in yesterday's sports calendar
that the Michigan wrestling
team would meet Ohio State
Saturday night. The meet is
against Illinois rather than the
Buckeyes.
high school eleven to a conference
and state championship. Knock-
ing over all their opponents dur-
i.ng the 1925 season, the boys from
Frederick rolled up 364 points to
their adversary's meager three.
* '*
WOLVERINE FANS may thank
another fellow traveler, John F.
Maulbetsch - a Michigan All-

American halfback in 1914, for
guiding Keen here to Ann Arbor.
Maulbetsch, former football tutor
of the Oklahoma Aggies, provided
the "open sesame" that dropped
Keen on Fielding H. Yost's door-
step.
Behieving that most wrestlers
are developed and not born,
Coach Keen points to the four
men from Michigan that made
the 1928 Olympic team-Bob
Hewitt, Russ Sauer, Al Watson
and Ed George. None of these
boyshad wrestled before com-
ing to college. Later, George
went on to win the world's pro-
fessional heavyweight title.
Michigan in 1932 was repre-
sented by Carl Dougovito, an-
other Keen tutored protege.
Last year's Olympic games in
London witnessed Keen as the
manages of the American wres-
tling delegation. Says Keen, "Al-
though we took only two matches,
our boys were top notch and a
wonderful gang to work with.'
Since 1925, Keen has wurned
out 13 national champs, and his
teaws have won I al mcchus, loz,-
ing. "Z. Conie.ren.ce t la i 1-
lis accrued to leli;i in
V)<,18 :nd 1KIM1, L ,t sca-,"'
Michi a foriedond i ia bsnd
Iow fr econd place behind
champion Purdue.
Spea king of cham ipions, Knew;
150 pound grid squads have wotn
the Little Big Nine championship
the last two years,

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