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December 15, 1948 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1948-12-15

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i

luman Rights

o*11E CASE OP the kettle calling the pot
black is now reaching comic proportions
in the cold war between Russia and the
West-comic, that is, until the tragic im-
plications of the fight are considered.
A current case in point is the passing
of the United Nations Declaration of Human
Rights reported in Saturday's papers.
In its present form, the declaration
calls for: Freedom of thought, conscience
and religion, expression and assembly,
prohibition of slavery, and freedom of
movement within a country and the right
to travel abroad.
Other "guaranteed" rights include: Right
a hold property, right to work and to have
a free choice of work, right to free leisure,
privacy of the home, and protection against
unemployment.
All of which sounds fine to American ears
-a Bill of Rights for all peoples, just like
our Constitution guarantees for us.
Then we read along a little further
into the stoiry, and find that Russian
Deputy Foreign Minister Andrei Vishinsky
attacked the measure as "leaving the door
open for fascism." With a snort we quickly
pass this off as just so much Russian
propaganda, and an attempt to discredit
the Western Powers.
But wait a minute-let's see what Vish-
insky wanted, and/why Russia and the So-
viet bloc abstained from voting on the dec-
laration in its present form.
The Russian proposal would have em-
phasized the rights of colonial peoples, pro-
claimed the right of everyone to. "combat
Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
are written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only.
NIGHT EDITOR: PHIL DAWSON

fascism" in all fields, outla wed. the pol1
tax and other voting restrictions, and made
all these provisions legally binding on all
nations.
For the believer in all , basic human
rights, this doesn't sound so bad, either;
few would contest that these proposals are
unnecessary in such a charter of liberty
supposed to last for the ages.
In fact, the only apparent difference be-
tween the rights proposed by the Western
Powers and the Soviet Union is just that
--the Soviet proposed rights would be those
bearing most heavily on the Western Pow-
ers, and vice versa.
Both sets of rights are therefore neces-
sary for a complete charter of human
liberties; yet the power politics tactics of
both force them hypocritically to demand
"rights" proposals which are not made in
the spirit of actual liberty, but as a propa-
ganda weapon.
Proof of this statement is the brazen
claim of the Western delegates that the
human rights declaration as it stands will
be a "potent ideological weapon" against
Communism (taken from Associated Press
dispatches).
And, of course, there was the typically ir-
responsible Russian charge during the de-
bate that the Western democracies paved
the way for World War II.
What is the point of all this? Simply
that the United States, despite its tem-
porary voting victory (48-0), has not
gained a real victory of wisdom or justice
any more than the Soviets.
Furthermore, the United States will not
be widely acclaimed as a real peacemaker
until we decide to take the bitter with
the sweet, and not only tell others what
rights they should grant their citizens, but
set our own house in order by correcting in-
justices and abridgement of civil liberties
-within our own nation.
-Russell B. Clanahan.

- Y FPEyNTITG a the clippings of the past
week-enid's fiasco in Costa Rica to
Andrei Vishisky and Henry Wallace our
government can answer in one breath the.
demands abroad for disarmaments and the
idealists at home who think it is the only
way to get peace.
The tiny nation of Costa Rica had the
greatest of intentiaons when it abolished
its Army a little over a week ago. The
President, like some of the "heads in
the clouds" liberals here at home, told
the people that what they needed was
more teachers and less military men. lie
told everyone to go home and plant their
crops, including the military leaders, and
Costa Rica would have peace.
One week later, the country had been in-
vaded and nearly overrun, allegedly by
forces from neighboring Nicaragua. At this
time there has been no help from the West-
ern Ilemisphere Defense Pact, signed a
couple o weeks ago,
Our Progressives would have us do the
same as Costa Rica. They would have us
disarm and go home to plant our crops,
perhaps hide our heads in the sand. But
we wonder.
The answer of the United States to Russia
was the same at the end of the U.N. session
as it w as at the beginning. There will be
no cut in American armaments until the
U.S. is assured of world peace. There wi
be no end to the rustling of spears in Mos-
cow4 and Washington until a more suitable
means of settling disputes is found.
If Vishinsky wants peace, he can startle
the world into action by making the sug-
gestion that so many people would like
one of the big powers to make-the sugges-
tion that the United Nations create an
armed force to police the world.
-Don McNeil.
I'D RATHER BE RIGHT:
orkingNotes
By SAMUEL GRAFTON
PLANNING: The Marshall Plan is making
Europeans giggle a little over American
inconsistency. They point out that we, who
hate planning at home, are showing a pas-
sion for it abroad. We are all out to raise
the European per capita annual income to
$500; we avidly study trade trends in sixteen
ERP countries; we try to balance national
economies everywhere. Not a nut or bolt
falls to earth over half this planet, but we
know of it. Yet at home, of course, planning
is still hateful New Deal nonsense. Here we
go mn}re for rugged individualism and the
workings of chance.
As to what the upshot will be, no man
can say. Maybe we shall end with a beauti-
fully poised and balanced world, in which
America alone will bubble and boil uncon-
trollablly, a closed flask in which the wild
particles dance, sealed off from a steadied
world. All of mankind's affairs will have
been stabilized and rationalized as a pro-
tection for our right to have a recession if
we want to, quietly and without interfer-
ence.
+ f a,

1

EXAMINATION SCHlED ULE
UJNIVEtRSITY OF M 1I0IGAN
COILEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EiDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FOrESTRY AND CONSERVATION .
SCHIOOL OF MUSIC
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
JANUARY 17-28, 1949
NOTE: For courses hving both lectures and quizzes, the
time of exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the
week; for courses having quizzes only, the time of exercise if the
time of the first quiz period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule. Evening,
4 o'clock, 5 o'clock, and "irregular" classes may use any of the
periods marked * provided there is no conflict. A final period
on January 28 is available in case no earlier period can be used.
To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each student should
receive notification from his instructor of the time and place
of his examination. In the College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts, no date of examination may be clanged without the
consent of the Examination Comnijhlee,

_

TIME OF EXERCISE

TIME OF EXAMINATION

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

at 8.........
at 9.
at 10.......
at 11.. .
at 1.......
at 2.
at 3....... .
at 8..........
at 9..........
at 10.. ......
at 11..........

. . . . . ... Mon.,
............. W ed.,
........... Fri.,
... Mon.,
...Wed.,
ue .,
......-.-.- Thu.Z
............. Ti es.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
.yan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
.Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

17,
19,
21,
24,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12

26, 9-12
25, 2- 5
27, 2- 5

. .
. .
. .

.. Thurs.,
.. Sat.,
.. Tues.,
.Thurs.,
.. .Wed.,
.Mon.,

18,
20,
22,
25,
27,
26,
24,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5

at 1...............
at 2...............
at 3 ...............

Irregulars, make-up, etc...............Fri.,
SPECIAL PERIODS
Political Science 1
Sociology 51, 54, 90 ............... . *Mon.
German 1, 2, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 .................. *Tues.,
English 1, 2
Psychology 31 .......................*Wed.,
Chemistry 1, 3
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 101 ......... . *Thurs,
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32, 61, 62,
91, 92, 153; Speech 31, 32 ............. *Fri.,
Botany 1; Zoology 1 ..................*Sat.,

Jan, 28, 9-12

Jan. 17, 2- 5
Jan. 18, 2- 5
Jan. 19, 2- 5
Jan. 20, 2- 5
Jan. 21, 2- 5
Jan. 22, 2- 5

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Conlnu ed from P e 2)
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. Giv-
en in partial fulfillment of the re-
quirements for Ihe degree of
Bachelor of Music., the program
will include works by Beethoven,
Brahms, Bach, Creston, Chopin,
and SchuberI. The general public
is invited.
Student Reital ara .Laux,
"student of piano under John Kol-
l ,will be heard in a program at
4:15 pn., Thurs., Dec. 16, Lydia
Mendelssohn Theat re. Presented
in partial fulfillment of the re-
quirements for the degree of
Bachelor of Music, it will include
compositions by Bac Beethoven,
Schubert, Debussy and Mendels-
sohn. The gne al public is in-
vited.
The University of Michigan
Choir, Maynard Klein, Conductor,
assisted by the University Orches-
tra and a brass choir, will present
a Christmas concert in Hill Audi-
torium, 3:30 p.m., Thurs., Dec. 16.
The program will feature the
American premiere of Benjamin
Britten's "Saint Nicolas," with the
choir, orchestra, and H a r old
Haugh, Associate Professor of
Voice, as tenor soloist. It will be
open to the public without charge.
Exhibitions
Museun of Art: America---the
Index of American Design, and
Ancient Peruvian Textiles, Alumni
Memorial Hall, through Dec. 28;
weekdays 9-5, Sundays 2-5 p.m.
The public is invited.
Events Today
A.S.C.E. Meeting, Rms, 3-KLMN,
Michigan Union. Mr. C. J. Kirch-
gessner, Portland Cement Associa-
tion will speak on the subject,
"Architectural Concrete."
United World Federalists: Gen-
eral meeting scheduled for Wed.,
Dec. 15 has been cancelled.
Sigma Gamma Epsilon: Meet at
12:15 p.m., Rm. 3056 N.S. Bldg.
Mr. Kenneth Keenmon will speak
on "The Geology of the .Blacktail
Area, Beaverhead County, Mon-
tana."
Pullic Relations Committee of
the Student Legislature will meet
at 3 p.m., 3rd floor, Michigan Un-
ion.
I.F.C. Ball: Petitions for com-
mittee chairmanships are due at
4 p.m. today.
Women of the University Fac-
ulty: Afternoon tea, 4 to 6 p.m.,
Michigan League. The next tea will
be held Jan. 5.
Motion Pictures: auspices of the
Audio-Visual Education Center
Healthful Living: Immunization;
Body Care and Grooming: Body
Fights Disease. 4:10 p.m., Kellog
Auditorium.
Roger Williams Guild-Christ-
mas tea :nd "chat" at Guil
House, 4:30-6 p.m.
Movie: Presented by Phi Lamb-
da Upsilon for chemistry and
chemical engineering students
4:30 p.m., Rm., 165 Chem-
istry Bldg. "Atomics Physics" an
"Molecular Theory of Matter."

Acolytes Meeting: 7:30 p.m.
West Lecture Room, Rackhan
Bldg. Talk by Prof. I. Copilowisl
on "Mathematical Certitude."
A.S.M.E.: meetin, 7:30 p.m
Natural Science Auditorium. Mov
ies will be shown.

Ulir Ski 'Club: Meeting, _
pm, Angel HalRom.25
Varsity Debate: Denonstrati,
debate on federal aid to edue.
tion; 7:30 p.m., Rm. 4203, Angel
Hall. Team assignments will .b
made for last practice series be
fore intercollegiate tournament i
February.
I.Z.F.A.: Song and Dance Group
7:45 p.m., Michigan League.
ADA Meeting: Discussion of pro
gram for next semester, election o
committee heads. All those inter
ested in joining ADA are invited
Members urged to come. 8 pm
Michigan Union.
American Institute of Electri
cal Engineers and Institute of Ra
dio Engineers, Joint Studen
Branch: Joint meeting with th
Michigan Section of AIEE. Mi
W. L. Manning of the Kouhlma
Electric Co. of Bay City will spea
on "The Testing of Modern Trans
formers with Laboratory Light
ning," Wed., Dec. 15, 8 p.m., Kel
logg Auditorium. NOTE: Pos
cards mailed to members gave th
wrong date. Open meeting.
English Journal Club 8 p.mn
West Conference Room, Rackhar
Bldg.
"The Narrative Perspective c
Ernest Hemingway" will be dis
cussed by.Mr. E. M. Halliday.
Research Club: 8 p.m., Rack
ham Amphitheatre. Papers
"Science, Innovation, and Ece
nomic Progress," Prof. Clare I
Griffin. "Studies in the Distribu
tion of Poliomyelitis," Dr. Thorn
Francis, Jr.
Coining Events
The Gilbert and Sullivan Soci
ty will hold a general meeting at
p.m., Jan. 6, Michigan Leagu
Everyone' should be present frox
the cast and crews to order pi
tures, get refunds on scores, l
ten to records of the last show, an
discuss future plans.
International Center weekly te
for all foreign students and Amer
can friends, 4:30-6 p.m., Thur
Dec. 16, International Cente
Hostesses: Mrs. T. H. Hildebranc
and Mrs. Philip Wernette.
U. of M. Radio Club meeting
7:30 p.m., 9m. 3503 (Radio Room
E. Eng. Bldg., Thurs., Dec. 16.
U. of M. Rifle Club: Ensian pi(
ture will be taken at 7 p.m. Thuri
Dec. 16, ROTC range. Bring 50
Only paid-up members in the pi
ture. Firing later.
Roger Williams Guild--Chris
mas Party and Caroling at Guil
House, 7:30 p.m., Thurs., Dec. 1
A women's all-campus singli
badminton tournament will I
held on Sat., Jan. 8, in Waterms
Gymnasium. Those interested
entering must sign up on the Ba
bour Gynasium bulletin board b
fore noon Fri., Dec. 17.

Armed Peace Orly

IT'S CERTAINLY far from encouraging to
learn that the one nation in today's
pathetic world that disbanded its army was
invaded nine days later.
Costa Rica's Provisional President Jose
Figueres, amid an ironically colorful cere-
mony, disbanded the army declaring that
Costa Rica was not a military country and
wants more teachers than soldiers early
this month.
Then, alas! An army which the Costa
Rican government claims was sent by Nic-
aragua invaded the eCntral American na-
tion fastSunday -
True, the proportions are on the musical
comedy scale rather than the grand opera
scale of international wranglings. The dis-

banded army, which never got a chance to
completely demobilize, was smaller than the
lit school and the invaders totaled slightly
more than half the West Quad.
And, as a matter of fact, some reports
saoy the "invaders" are revolting Costa
Ricans-Figueras' reign dates from May 8.
But the tragi-comedy of the situation,
that no nation may have peace without
an army, is .just as stinging as it would be
were the nations larger.
For it would seem to indicate that the
only peace in this battered world .is an
armed peace, and that any nation which
places books above battles will learn the
hard way the error of its judgment.
-John Davies.

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School Bulletin Board.
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School Bulletin Board.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual Instruction in Applied Music.
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all
applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for credit
in any unit of the University. For time and place of examina-
tions, see bulletin board at the School of Music.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC IEALTH
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School Bulletin Board.
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, College of Engineering
JANUARY 17i TO JANUARY 28, 1949
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week;
for courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time of
the first quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through the
examination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to
such work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between as-
signed examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3209 East Engineering Build-
ing between January 3 and January 8 for instruction. To avoid
misunderstandings and errors each student should receive noti-
fication from his instructor of the time and place of his appear-
ance in each course during the period (January 17 to January 28.
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee.

MATTER OF FACT:

Stronger Controls

By JOSEPH and STEWART ALSOP
VASHINGTON-Behind the White House
scenes, the President's right and left
wing advisers have been locked in another
of their languid but embittered struggles.
The issue has been the President's policy
on economic controls and taxation. And the
outcome can apparently be summed up in
six bleak words-strong controls and much
higher taxes.
In these palace battles, even the com-
position of forces is sometimes difficult
to discern exactly. But there are signs,
nonetheless, that the present struggle has
shown variation from the prvvious pattern.
The leading advocates of boldness have
been the White House counsel, Clark Dlif -
ford, and Dr. Leon Keyserling of the Eco-
nomic Advisory Council. These two de-
vised the ten-point inflation control pro-
gram which the President offered to the
special session of Congress in November,
1947, against the virtually unanimous ad-
vice of his Cabinet. Their position thus
remains unchanged, as does Truman's re-
liance upon them.
It is a change, however, that the Cabinet
has remained largely aloof, except that Sec-
retary of the Treasury John Snyder has
given his customary advice to go slow. And
it is also an important change that the
chief champions of caution have this time
been Dr. Keyserling's chief, the chairman
of the Economic Advisory Council, Dr. Ed-
win Nourse, and the Director of the Bud-
get, James Webb. The lineup discloses the
existence of two schools of thought about
national policy, both beginning with almost
the same assumptions, but divided on the
crucial points of timing and range of gov-
ernmental effort.
The great advantage of the "go fast"
faction has been their previous successes,
prior to the fall session last year, and the
summer special session this year. Perhaps
a greater effort might have been made
by the "go slow" group on those earlier
occasions, if they had regarded the Presi-

recommendations for controls of consumer
credit and bank credit. The other recom-
mendations were ostentatiously not con-
sidered. But they will be considered this
time. The President now speaks with tie
confidence and authority of his great per-
sonal victory on election day. He means to
fight for the program which was once
laughed off as mere election-year politick-
ing.
The mere preservation of consistency
is not the only argument being used for
excess profits taxes, however. Industrial
profits have risen from $12.5 billions after
taxes in 1946, which was then an all time
high, to another all time high of $18.1
billion in 1947, to a third estimated all
time high of $21 billion this year.
The aim is to raise as much as $5 billion
of added government revenue by new taxa-
tion. The projected excess profits tax is
not expected to produce more than about
half of this sum. Thus it is probable that
upward revision of individual income taxes
will also be proposed. Straight repeal of
the Knutson tax reduction bill is thought
to be impracticable, but middle and higher
bracket taxpayers will probably lose a good
deal of what they have gained.
Clearly, these will be unpalatable pills for
the Congress to swallow. Yet it is pretty
hard to answer the reasoning of the Pres-
ident's "go fast" advisers when they point
out that in the midst of world crisis, prud-
ence demands strong measures to prevent
any disastrous upset of the vital American
economy.
(Copyright, 1948, New York Herald Tribune, Inc.)
h. d.

MORE OF THE SAME: Of course the
only situation I know of that is even
stronger is the way the British go in
for socialist planning at home, while
carrying on the dustiest kind of old-
fashioned imperialist policy abroad, as
in their relations with the Arabs of the
Middle East.
This is the century in which one walks on
uneven stilts, and complains furiously that
the ground isn't level.
NEWS NOTE: Young Philip Willkie, 28,
who is campaigning for a "revitaliza-
tion" of the Republican party, gave me the
most accurate election forecast of anybody
I spoke with before election day. He hit it
pretty much on the nose, around October
10th.
CHINA AID: The comparatively cold re-
ception Madame Chiang Kai-Shek is
receiving in Washington may turn out to
be our smartest diplomatic stroke in months.
It is certainly not hurting us with the Chi-
nese people, nor with world opinion. It may
even mark a break in our numb, pedestrian
routiie of tamely supporting every reaction-
ary in the world, so long as he is opposed
to Russia. After Madame Chiang's trip,
reactidn may no longer be able automati-
cally to count on us, and that is good.
Of course we still have much further
to go before we will realize that our proper
approach to reaction is neither to sup-
port it nor to ignore it, but to be its
actual, active enemy, in direct competition
with the Soviet Union. The way to oppose
Russia is to prove that our side gets rid
of reaction faster, better.
But we haven't even realized that we've
been in this sort of competition with Russia.
And so we've been jubilantly picking up
allies whom she doesn't want, and is quite
glad to let us have. We're not in a buatting-
match with Russia; we're in a race. It is a
race to win the faith of peoples. When the
name of America becomes a terrible name7
to reaction, we shall have some chance of
winning that race. But we certainly can't
hone to win it unless we get into it.

F fty-Ninth Year

TIME OF CLASS

TIME OF EXAMINATION

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8. ................. M on.,
9 ..................W ed.,
10........... .....Fri.,
11 .................Mon.,
1 ..................Wed.,
2 ..................Tues.,
3 ..................Thurs.,
8 ..................Tues.,
9 .................. Thurs.,
10 ..................Sat.,
11.................Tfues.
1 ..................Thurs.,
2.................. W ed.,
3 ...................Mon.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

17,
19,
21,
24,
26,
25,
27,
18,
20,
22,
25,
27,
26,
24,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5

i., I
-

Ch.-Met. 1; M.P. 3, M.P. 4 ............
E.M. 1, 2; C.E. 22; Germ.; Span........
Eng. 11; Draw. 3; M.E. 135;
Surv. 1, 2 .........................
Chem. 1, 3; Ec. 53, 54, 101 ...........
Draw. 2; E.E. 5; French .............
Draw. 1; M.E. 13; Phys. 45,

.Mon.,
..*Tues.,
.. *Wed.,
*'Thurs.,
.Fri.,

Jan. 17, 2- 5
Jan, 18, 2- 5

Jan. 19,
Jan. 20,
Jan. 21,

2-
2-
2-

5
5
5

The Deutscher Verein: Christ-
mas meeting, 7:30 p.m., Michigan
Union. (Notice change of usual
time and date.) Caroling after
meeting; Bring flashlights.
Flying Club: Important business
meeting. 7:30 p.m., 1942 E. Engi-
neering Bldg. Reorientation of the
club will be discussed.
Institute of Aeronautical Sci-
ences: Meeting, Dr. A. A. Fejer,,
Director of the Jet Laboratory of
Packard Aircraft Engine Division,
Packard Motor Co., will speak on
the subject, "Jet Engine Perform-
ance," 7:30 p.m., Rm. 3R,S, Michi-
gan Union. Slides and Movies will
be shown.
Pre-Medical Society: Meeting,
7:30 p.m., Henderson Room, Mich-
igan League. Dr. Max M. Peet,
Chairman of the Dept. of Surgery,
will be the speaker.

Edited and managed by students
the University of Michigan under t
authority of the Board in Control
Student Publications.
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Allegra Pasqualetti ....Associate Edil
Arthur Higbee ........Associate Edil
Murray Grant..........Sports Edii
Bud Weidenthal ..Associate Sports 3
Bev Bussey ......Sports Feature Wri
Audrey Buttery........Women's Edil
Bess Hayes ..................Librari
Business Staff
Richard Halt......Business Mana
JeanLeonard ....Advertising Man
William Culman .....Finance Manas
Cole Christian ....Circulation Manal
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Entered at the Post Office at A
Arbor, Michigan, as second-class fl
matter.
Subscription during the regu
school year by carrier, *5.00. by m
$6.00.

M .E. 136 ........................ .... Sat.,
C.E. 21..... ....................... Mon.,
Conflicts and irregular ...............'..'*Fri.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

22, 2- 5
24, 2- 5
28, 9-12

Evening, 12 o'clock, 4 o'clock, and "irregular" classes may
use any of the periods marked provided there is no conflict.
The final period on January 28 is available in case no earlier
period can be used.

Looking Back

50 YEARS AGO TODAY:
The number of women in the University
increased over the previous year-the new
total was 673, according to President James

i
A policeman! H+
find my Fairy G

e'll help us
odfather-

No personal remarks,
nmoppet. And no jokes
. A L..

I'm hot on the trail of
a character by the name

Of course. I've been hot
on his trail ever since-

Ii

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