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December 15, 1948 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, iMS4

Tilt MI WA RAMP

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Wolverine Cagers
COLLEGE PUCK CLASSIC:
'M' To Face Powerful Toronto Sextet

I

orm mm
But Play 'Steady' Game
A gainst T oledo--cCoy
IIarris on, McCaslin Share Scoring Llad
After First Three Gaines with 29 Points

MY

Over

itt

Sam mies Win in All Divisions
To CopIM Wrestling Crown

By B. S. BROWN
Michigan's claim to interna-
tional hockey supremacy will face
the first of two tests Thursday
night in the Chicago Stadium,
home stamping grounds of the
National Hockey League's Black-
hawks.
Meeting the University of To-
ronto, which usually tops the col-
legiate parade across the border,
in the first of a two-game series,
the Wolverines will be playing be-
fore one of the largest throngs
ever to witness a college hockey
game.
The Stadium is the largest in-
door sports arena in the country,
with a seating capacity approxi-
mating 18,500. A sell-out is expect-
ed.
Michigan will return to Ann Ar-
bor Friday night to complete the
commitment with the Canadian
sextet.
THE WINDY CITY is display-
ing a definite liking for collegiate
hockey, especially when it is
played by the cream of the college
circles.
Last year, Toronto was the un-
disputed champ of Canada, while
the Wolverines clubbed the top
U.S. outfits at Colorado Springs
for the NCAA crown.
But last season's game, played
at the Chicago Arena, which has
about one quarter the seating
capacity of the Stadium, came

SPORTS
ROG GOELZ, Night Editor
early in the season. Neither To-
ronto nor Michigan was assured
of a national crown or even a
winning season, but the fans
turned out in force.
And what they saw went over
big. Two weeks ago, 13,000 seats
had been sold, and they were going
f ast.
Michigan won that game last
year, 3-2, playing one of its best
games of the year. The Wolverines
jumped into an early lead in the
first period on goals by Al Ren-
frew, on a solo, and Ted Greer,
with an assist by Bill Jacobson.
But Toronto was ranked as the
best Canada had to offer, and it
showed its potentialities two min-
utes later when Bill Henry, second
line center, took a lift from Don
Bark and beat Michigan goalie
Jack McDonald with a five-footer.
BOTH TEAMS picked up single
tallies in the middle frame to up
the score to 3-2, and that's the way
it ended. Wally Gacek netted the

final Wolverine score, while Cecil
Turcott did his part for the Can-
adian cause with a goal in the
closing seconds of the period.
Michigan not only won a
game that night which would
lay open its claim to the mythi-
cal international crown later in
the season, but it also defeated
the team which never before
fell to a Wolverine attack.
Michigan had tried nine times
before and failed. For their win-
ning efforts, the Wolverines were
presented with the William
Thompson Memorial Trophy.
The two teams met again the
following night in Ann Arbor and
fought to a 4-4 deadlock.
For Michigan Coach Vic Hey-
liger, Friday's game will have a
special significance. The Michi-
gars mentor is a former member
of the Blackhawk organization
and for him it will mean a re-
turn to familiar surroundings.
Heyliger will probably remember
the first game Michigan played
with the Toronto team. It was in
1937, and Heyliger was a member
of the Wolverine squad-a very
successful one at that.
He had just been named captain
and center on the all-Midwest sex-
Coach Wally Weber requests
all 1948 freshman football nu-
meral award winners to report
to the Athletic Administration
Building today to obtain copies
of the 1948 team pictures.
tet. Michigan lost that game, 4-2.
but both of the Wolverine scores
were set up by the present pilot
and scored by his line-mate, Gib
James.
Wolverine hockey has come a
long way since then. Toronto re-'
tained its supremacy over Michi-
gan until last year, but the tide
has begun to turn. Whether it will
continue or not rests entirely upon{
the shoulders of the latest edi-
tion of Wolverine hockey.
DO YOU KNOW THAT . . . In
1947, Michigan lost six coaches,
two in basketball, two in foot-
ball, and one each in track and
tennis.

Michigan's cagers beat Toledo
Saturday night, 51 - 40, and
whipped Pitt two nights later, 62-
44, but the outfit that clipped the
Panthers' claws wasn't the same
one that took the Ohioans.
Coach Ernie McCoy put it this
way: "Saturday night the team
played a good, steady brand of
ball; against Pitt we were way
off.,,I
He said that he was happy to
beat the highly respected To-
ledo quintet, but added that the
Rockets are capable of a much
better brand of ball.
The Wolverine mentor predict-
ed that the next game between

contest, so McCoy gave him the
nod when it came to picking
the starting center against Pitt.
The blond sophomore rose to!
the occasion once more, and
dumped in five field goals and
three tosses from the free throw
line to end up as the second
high Maize and Blue scorer for
the night with 13 points.
In addition he used his six-
foot five-inch frame to good
advantage, and nabbed many
rebounds off the backboard.
Another heartening sight to the
Wolverine faithful was the return
of Mack Suprunowicz to the form-
that made him the top Michigan
scorer last year.
Against Michigan State and
Toledo, "Supey" had a hard
time finding the mark and
dumped in only 10 points in'
those two games.
When he walked off the court
after the Pitt contest, he found1
himself topping the Maize andl
Blue scorers with 14 points.
The play of Boyd McCaslin
over the weekend was another
gratifying sight.
Always noted as a steady play-
er, the Bremerton, Wash., seniorl
netted 15 points against Toledo,
the highest any Wolverine has
made in a single contest this year.
Ile is now tied with Bob Har-
rison for the scoring lead with
29 points over the three-game
stretch.
In all the games, though, it was
the defens e that stood out.
Coach McCoy has instituted a;
two-team system at bie guards,
using Pete Elliott and Harrison as
the starters and sending in Hal
Morrill and Bill Doyle to spell
them.
Elliott, Harrison, and Morrill
have turned in the fine perform-
ances expected of them, and
Doyle, a sophomore, has shown!
up so well in competition that he's
been teamed with Morrill to give
Michigan a second line of defense.
DO YOU KNOW THAT . .. Cliff
Keen, varsity wrestling coach,
was the United States wrestling
coach in the Olympics last year.

Sigma Alpha Mu, a real dark-
horse, walked away with the Fra-
ternity wrestling crown last night
at the I-M Building as the Sam-
mies amassed 15 points and three
individual titles.
Three points back of S.A.M.
came Kappa Sigma, while Sigma
Phi Epsilon and Phi Gamma Delta
finished third and fourth, with 9
and 8 points respectively.
Championships came to S.A.M.
in the 121- pound, 175-pound and
unlimited division. Bud Hill scored
a 3-0 decision over Lloyd Jewell,
of Sig Ep, in the lightweight class.
Jerry Morris, the Sammy 175-
pounder, got his title the easy way
GREGG COLLEGE
A School of Business-Preferred by
College Men and Women
4 MONTH
INTENSIVE COURSE
SECRETARIAL TRAINING FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS AND GRADUATES
A thorough, intensive course-starting
June, October, February. Bul-
letin A on request
SPECIAL COUNSELOR for G.I. TRAINING
Regular Day and Evening Schools
Throughout the Year. Catalog
Direcr, Paul M. Pair, M.A.
THE GR EGG COLLEGE
37 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago 3. Illinois

as Phi Gam Bob Spiegel forfeited.
In the Unlimited division Dave
Gomberg picked up two points in
"riding time" to edge Phi Delt
Tom Kelsey.
Over in the Residence Hall di-
vision, the favorite Williams
House, with seven finalists scored
25 points to walk away with the
crown.
Cooley House was second with
11 and Wenley, Tyler and Lloyd
Houses tied for third with 9 pointE
each.

H

OLIDAY
Adventure in
Good Smoking

BOB HARRISON
.. tied with Boyd

lip
(*

.
PENS.
Typewriters
Games
Hobbies
Tools
Craft
Materials
Puzzles

1

WE HAVE ITY
Maybe You Won't Find It at Home.
Come in and see our
HOBBY DEPARTMENT
- Gifts for All Ages -
Office Outfitters
115 W. Liberty St.

BOYD MeCASLIN
his 2 Ipoints are igh .. .
the tivo squads, which is being
held in Toledo on January 1, will
probably turn out to be a lot
harder.
Michigan's victories are more
notable when onc considers the
fact that Bill Roberts, the start-
ing center, was unable to play
because of a sore knee.
Irv Wisniewski was therefore se-
lected to open the first game at
the pivot position, and shared the
duties with Leo Vander Kuy and!
Dick Rifenburg.
Vander Kuy was the most
outstanding of the three in that

Team o Year
Awai d Give
lb (ilvelles
NEW YORK - (VP) -- Purdue,
which almost pulled the upset of
the decade against Notre Dame
and then folded up, is college
football's "flop team" of the year.
And Michigan -no surprise here
--is the "team of the year."
That was the opinion of sports
writers and c otches who took
part in the M~ociated Press' an-
nual poll at the end of the grid
season.
Purdue was mentioned for the
floperoo nomination more times
than all other teams together.
Tulsa, which had a Delta Bowl in-
vitation accepted before the sea-
son began, and Navy ran two-
thrce behind the Boilermakers for
the "award."
Behind Michigan came Notre
Dame, North Carolina, California,
Oklahoma and Army. That was
the same order in which they fin-
ished in the final AP rating poll
of the year.

ARMY OFFICERS'
BOOTS

i= _

-= -- .

49

on
Sale
at
Nationally
Advertised
Air-O -Ma,~ic

788

......__......._._.
9
S
1
t

t

FRANK DAILEY'S
ME ADOW BROOK
Cedar Grove, N.J.
MICHIGAN NIGHT
December 27, 1948
RAY McKINLEY
and his orchestra
For Information and Reservations --
CONSULT: AL BECKER - Phone 2-1349
Route 23 Newark - Pompton Turnpike
Verona 8-1914 Little Falls 4-0110
The
LIBETY MUSC SHOAV"P

I

it

FROM THIE OT STOVE LEAGUE:
Cleveland I is Title Defense wit Big Player

CHICAGO - (P) -- Cleveland
struck a major blo win defenseI
of its world championship today
by acquiring first baseman Mickey
Vernon and pitcher Early .Wynn
from Washington.
This major swap, involving five
players, touched off another wild
bidding spree by other American
League teams needing help.
* * *
DETROIT'S OFFER of some
HAPPY
HOL IDAYS!!
Your appearance nd hap-
piness is imporktndt to all
of us--let uw (onfirm" lie fl
goodI work---Jb 1I1)(1 if Ii
workmanrl ip and ;srvice to
please .yotu -!-!
The DASCOLA BARDERS
Liberty off late

$150,000 to $200,000 and two play-
ers for . the St. Louis Browns'
Gerry Priddy was not accepted.
The Tigers are trying hard to dig
up a capable second baseman.
They also are interested in the In-
dians' Johnny Berardino and the
Chicago White Sox' Cass Mi-
chaels.
The New York Yankees, who
thought they blocked the other
contenders by last night's deal
for pitcher Fred Sanford from
Ohe gowns, were disilbisioned
ASE SlNG wialways
can, 2 be countedi on for a new slant
on a problem, told lobby sitters:
"I went to bed last night with
a pennant winner and woke up
thbis mnorning in second."
I!President-1billI W'eck of the In-
d ios was J11)1I n1, About the swap.
*WiE HAVE added speed that
-koisld help us,' he said, "Vernon
is a fast man. Last year when
Eien Kltier, Lou Boudreau, and
Eddie Robinson were on base, it

took three long singles to score
three runs."
Robinson was one of the three
players who went to Washing-
ton in the transaction. The
others were pitchers Joe Haynes
and Ed Klieman.
Baseball men did not hear of
the deal, which broke about 5
o'clock in the morning, until
breakfast time. There was a great
deal of surprise on all sides, espe-
cially in the announcement that
1o casih was involved.

Dick Bartell having been named
recently.
Two veteran pitchers were
shuffled in other deals announced
today. Ken Trinkle, who had a
4-5 record for the New York
Giants in 53 relief appearances,
was sold to the Philadelphia Phils.
The Chicago Cubs peddled Hank
Wyse, who was at Shreveport, La.,
of 'the Texas League last year, to
Los Angeles of the Pacific Coast.
I'i st 1baseman Steve Souchok,
too? liss lwei o rid(lig the Yankee

SPlain Toe with Buckle
* Hand Moulded Insoles
w Rubber Heels
A Storm Welt
SAM'SSTOREt-

i)(lrlcl I, W(I t to t he White Soxt
VT'J', NO CASH?" wac; hewircr lie will be a regular, The
utniversal comment. Many found iYanks get outfielder Jim Delsing,
it difficult to believe that the Sen- . ank3 her t ollywood, and
ators would trade two established la .333 hitter at Hollywood, and
atos wuldtrae wo stalisedanother unnamed player. Both
regulars without getting a wagon- will be sent to the minors.
load of grecenbac ks.
D spitecthe a Illwiciinixh ntr
the rumor market had it tha Stat rum o.
$100,000 changed hands.
Detroit broke into the news by
signing Ted Lyons, former Whi In Slutcit and Pacckurd
"ox manager, to coach unde' ICE CREAM LUNCHES
Manager Red Rolfe. Lyons be-DRG
comes the second Tiger coach,

122 E. Washington

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Presentcd as a stirring narrative with

"WEEK-END TEST"
proves: cleaner,
more soothing shaves!
DON'T JUST GUESS WHAT GIVES YOU THE BEST !HAVE
-MAKE THIS MQLL "WEEK-END TEST."

i

I

for Last
Week of Schoolu!
CONTINUE TIHRU
DEC. 18th
ALL
1043 (Ii

\ _ LL

£ d
2

Take Off that Halo,
Bud .
=i
d E'
Fi::i." it .:
.i

< ~dramatic commentary by the famous
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ON
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