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December 09, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-12-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TILE IHIGANDALY

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1948

;_. ~.

JOURNALISM LECTURER:
'Monitor' Editor To Talk
Here on World Affairs

ii

Erwin D. Canham, editor of the
Christian Science Monitor, will
deliver two addresses on world
affairs here tomorrow.
Canham, sixth speaker in the
journalista lecture series, will dis-
cuss "The American Press and
World Crisis" before a campus au-
dience at 3 p.m. tomorow in Rm.
B Haven Hall.
* *. *
HIS SECOND ADDRESS, "Can
We Achieve Peace?" will be at 9
p.m. tomorrow in Rackham Lec-
Daily Visits
Coach of Year'
In Off-Hours
(Continued from Page 1)
The cups are packed away in
the basement, and the only
sign of athletic prominence is a
bracelet Bennie had made for
his wife.
It is a heavy gold chain holding
the All-American and Big Ten
championship gold balls he won
in baseball, basketball, and foot-
ball.
"I WEAR IT for good luck at
every game. When Michigan gets
in trouble, I grab one of the balls,
usually anlA-American, until
everything clears up," she said.
The commotion around the
Oosterbaan house doesn't clear
up, however, until the season is
over. Phone calls come at any
hour, and people swarm to their
home every weekend like flies
to a sugarbowl.
The Mrs. is never unprepared.
Extra spaghetti or what she calls
"stretch food" is always on hand.
Her biggest job is steering after-
game talk away from football.
She realizes that her husband
doesn't like to discuss it with any-
one except the coaches.
* *
"BENNIE IS happy that all I
know about football is thatait's
played on a green grass field,"
Mrs. Oosterbaan admitted.
That's all she cared about at
first. She and Anna took more
interest in the band maneuvers
-which they watch for hours
at practice.
Yet, Mrs. Oosterbaan agrees
with her daughter. Recently, in
the coaches' office, they asked
who her favorite player was.
Knowing that her blond young-
ster is always cutting out pictures
of 'chuck Ortmann and Pete El-
liott, Mrs. Oosterbaan expected
one of these Wolverines to be
named.
But, without hesitating a mo-
ment, little Ann exclaimed loud-
ly, "My daddy!"
Campus
Calendar
EVENTS TODAY
Polonia Club-7:30 p.m. in Rm.
3N of the Union. Prof. Lobanov-
Rostovsky will talk on "Poland:
Rise and Decline." Open to the
public.
American Society of Automo-
tive Enginees-7:30 p.m. in the
Union. Prof. L. Clayton Hill will
discuss personnel management.
Open to the public.
Lawyers' Guild-3:30 p.m. in
the Union. Prof. Hobart Coffey
will discuss proposed uniform di-
rorce legislation. Opei to the
public.
Young Democrats-7:30 p.m. in
the League. Mrs. Margaret Price,
vice-chairman of county Demo-
cratic committee, will speak.

for, the
DISTINCTIVE
GIFT
Give
Distinctive Footwear
ARGYLES . . hand-made,
imported wool-in beau-
tiful and unusual color
combinations.

ture Hall. Provost James P. Adams
will. introduce Canham.
A former Rhodes Scholar,
Canham is the president of the
American Society of Newspaper
Editors.
He became managing editor of
the Christian Science Monitor in
1941, and editor in 1945.
JOINING THE MONITOR in
1925 as a foreign correspondent,
Canham 'later served as chief of
the Monitor News Bureau in
Washington.
At the invitation of Secretary
of War Robert Patterson, Can-
ham made a 25,000 mile tour of
the Far East last year.
He is' a former member of two
UNESCO commissions. His pres-
ent activities include a weekly
news interpretation broadcast on
a national network.
a: * "r
THE JOURNALISM department
will hold a coffee hour following
his afternoon address, and the
dinner given by the University for
Canham tomorrow night will be
attended by newspaper editors and
publishers from various parts of
the states.
Dormitory News
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Contributors to
What's Up in the Dorms should con-
tact Dolores Palanker at The Daily or
Betsy Barbour.)
Mosher Hall's annual Christmas
tea, from 4:30 to 5 p.m. today,
will be sponsored by the Mosher
freshman class who will serve as
hostesses and provide entertain-
ment.
PLANS are already afoot for
East Quad's third annual "E Cue
Ball," a four orchestra, four-ball-
room affair.
All East Quad men interested
in any phase of the dance's pro-
duction should contact Ray Litt'
general chairman, at 423 Strauss
House.
"YE OLDE Yuletide Spirit" is
gathering at Strauss House for the
annualsChristmas party next
Wednesday.
On the program will be plenty
of edibles, punch, carol singing
by the entire house, a branch of
the Strauss Serenaders in two
solos, house president Ralph Ham-
ilton in a violin solo and finally,
a grab bag of novelty gifts to be
drawn for by all the men.
The gifts are to be purchased
by those attending for a maxi-
mum of 25 cents.

WELLES AT HEARING-Sumner Welles (deft), former Undersec-
retary of State, talks with Rep. Karl Mundt (Rep., S.D.) at a
meeting of the House Un-American Activities Committee. Welles
was called to testify in the committee's investigation of alleged
Communist spy activities.
ON SALE MONDAY NEXT:
Gargoyle Will Review Books
For Young Folks' Chris tmas

AVC Aids
Vets Drive
For TV Set
Spending Christmas in a hos-
pital isn't much fun, but it can
be brightened when buddies pitch
in to cheer it up.
Learning that patients at the
Veterans' Readjustment Center
had collected $100 among them-
selves to buy a television set,
the campus chapter of the
American Veterans' Committee
voted to help them with a gift
of '$110.
And AVC's Art Moskoff was ap-
pointed to canvass Ann Arbor tel-
evision dealers for the "best deal"
for the center, and to enlist the
aid of individuals and organiza-
tions for the rest of the money
needed.
MOSKOFF found George Me-
Cotter, local television dealer and
himself a veteran, enthusiastic
about the project.
M*Cotter figured that by do-
nating his~ profit and labor
costs, he could cut the price of
a $1,000 set to $600.
AVC IS URGING all students
and townspeople who want to
make Christmas more pleasant
for hospitalized vets to contribute.
Contributions or pledges may
be sent to Art Moskoff at 1017
Vaughan or phoned to 2-7570.
Union Seeks
Yule Drivers
The Union's vacation travel
service is still accepting requests
for rides or passengers for the
Christmas exodus.
Students may register from 3
to 5 p.m. daily by telephone or in
person at the Student Offices of
the Union. All names and des-,
tinations are entered in a master
file which is consulted as each
request is made.
Students whose requests can be
filled are notified by the Union.
Far more persons desiring rides
have registered up to now than
those who can supply rides, ac-
cording to Bob Seeber, chairman
of the House Affairs Committee.

An answer to the question of
what to get children for Christ-
mas is offered in the next issue
of the Gargoyle, which will go on
sale this Monday.
The Garg's solution is : give
books and its Christmas issue will
have a special section devoted to
a discussion of books for young
folks.
"IT IS BECAUSE we know the
value of good literature that we
have included this new and im-
portant section," Norm Gottlieb,
associate editor of the Gargoyle,
declared yesterday.
* *,' *
THE REVIEWER, it was re-
lated, has drawn extensively from
his own personal experience with
children in writing this article.
His suggestions take into consid-
eration the workings of a child's
mind, in addition to what his
tastes are.
IRA To Hear Talk
By Negro Author
Harry Haywood, author of the
current book "Negro Liberation,"
will speak on the "Negro Problem
in America" at an open meeting of
the Inter-Racial Association at
4:30 p.m. today in the Union.
Son of former slaves, Haywood
is known as a leading Negro Marx-
ist, and as a pioneer in the move-
ment to organize southern whiteI
and Negro workers.

The Christmas issue will not
contain any information regard-
ing literature for adults. For any
who are searching for a gift of
this nature, The Gargoyle was
unanimously recommended by its
entire literary staff.
Steinbeck Film
To BeShown
John Steinbeck's "Of Mice and
Men" will be presented by the Art
Cinema League and Inter-Racial
Association at 7 and 9 p.m. tomor-
row and Saturday in the Architec-
tural Auditorium.
Receiving wide acclaim as a
novel and later as a play, "Of Mice
and Men" was transcribed to the
screen by Lewis Milestone4 The
film stars Burgess Meredith, Lon
Chaney Jr. and Betty Field.
Tickets will go on sale today at
Rm. 2 University Hall.

UNIVERSITY LECTURER -
Prof. H. Gordon Hullfish, of
Ohio State University, will dis-
cuss "Democratic Education and
World Crisis" at 8:30 p.m. to-
day in Kellogg Auditorium. His
lecture, sponsored by the educa-
tion school, will be open to the
public.
'Yeomen' To
End Tonig t
Tonight is the last chance for
local audiences to observe "Yeo-
men of the Guard" as they go
into action on the stage of Pat-
tengill Auditorium. %
"Yeomen," the current produc-
tion of the Gilbert and-Sullivan
Society, closes its three-day run
in Ann Arbor with tonight's per-
formance which begins at 8 p.m.
CRITICS have acclaimed this
light opera as one of the best ever
to be created by the English mas-
ters of the last century.
A few tickets for tonight's per-
formance are still available at the
University Hall ticket booth, and
tickets will be sold at the Patten-
gill box office until the curtain
goes up.
RARE OPPORTUNITY!
STUDY. . . TRAVEL
in SPAIN
BARCELONA MALAGA
GROUP GROUP
65 Days 65 Days
June 29, 1949 July 2, 1949
Sponsored by:
UNIVERSITY OF MADRID
For Information, Write
SPANISH STUDENT TOURS'
500 Fifth Ave., N.Y. 18, N.Y.
An Adventure in
Good Smoking
t"

FOR NEEDY EUROPEANS:
Appeal Made To Students
In Quaker Clothing Drive

Your cast-off clothing can make
any day Christmas for the needy
in Europe.
The Ann Arbor Society of
Friends voiced this appeal in
opening their two-week cloth-
ing drive this week.'
Contributions may be left at
Tuckaway House, on the corner
of Liberty and Maynard Streets,
this week and next.
AN AMERICAN Friends Service
Committee worker in Germany
reported on conditions thererin a
letter to the local Quaker group:
"A young man recently re-
turned from Russia had bor-
rowed clothes from a friend so
that he might come to us for
help.
"There are cold legs bound with
rags because there are no stock-
ings; a. little boy's feet are blis-
tered and sore from shoes too
small for him.
. k .
"THE FACES we see are trou-
bled, some bewildered, some hard.
Others show only joy and grati-
tude."
Old clothing, especially warm
coats, suits, dresses and shoes are
needed, Jack Huebler, publicity
chairman for the Quakers, said.

Condition of the clothes does
not matter, he emphasized. The
group will clean, repair and
pack them at a work party fol-
lowing the drive.
The clothing will be distributed
in European countries through
the American Friends Service
Committee.
Textiles Shown
In Alumni Hall
An exhibition of 50 pre-Spanish
Peruvian textiles will be on dis-
play through Dec. 28 in the Uni-
versity Museum of Art, Alumni
Memorial Hall.
These ancient Peruvian textiles
are among the finest in the world
as far as technical virtuosity, per-
fection of design and color and
preservation are concerned, ac-
cording to museum officials.
The textiles were woven in the
period from 300 A.D. to the early
16th century.
They are being circulated by
the American Federation of Arts,
Washington, D.C. through the
courtesy of the Textile Museum of
the District of Columbia.

[[I

-1

Announcing
Gargoyle's

\

ii !

CHRISTMAS GIFT

TURKEY
Complete with Stuffing

y f

SUGGESTIONS
SMITH
CORONA
PORTABLES

III

9',
I:
for your
PERSONALIZED GIFTS

Monday, December 13

A portable typewriter is the perfect gift
for a college student ... come in and see them.

25c

at your corner vendor

25c

PENS & PENCILS
ETO ALBUMS
D)ESK IlAMPS

CARDS AND GAMES
SCRAP BOOKS

BOOK ENDS

..

I

Stationery
Playing Cards
Paper Napkins
Matches

BILLFOLDS STATIONERY
0. D .MORRILL
State Street at North University

offers
RESERE ET B SS

HAMSAY-CANFIELD
/rcn lerJ

IN!

119 East Liberty

Phone 7900

Dress For Any Occasion
with

__ .. __ _ ___ . __ __

-

' x
4

GIFT,

S

leaving Michigan Union for Chicago, December
1948 at 4 P.M. Making connections at
Chicago for all points.
Secure tickets and reservations in advance
at Boersrna Travel Service, Nickels Arcade or
BUS STATION, 116 West Huron Street.

17,

for '"Him""
Royal Robes ........... 9.85 to 22.50
Shapely Shi/ts ..........2.95 to 4.95
Beau Brummell Ties..... 1.00 to 2.50
Gates Gloves ................3.25 up
Lined and Unlined
Sandy McDonald Pajamas .... , 3.95 up
Coopers Sox (Argyles) ........75c up
Pioneer Billfolds ............ 3.50 up

Fare One Way 4.60

Round Trip

8.30

ZIPPER SPORT SHIRTS
grey, maroon, green, brown

Other typical low cost fares from Ann Arbor with frequent service:

599

One Way
New York, N.Y. ............... ..11.75
a. -.7 .m

Round Trip
21.15
01 Ca

11

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