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December 04, 1948 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SATRAY, DECEME 4; 1 E4

THE -,"m icu GA1**DTAitYr

PAGER lE

TA LKING SHOP
with Bud Weidenthal
Associate SPorts Editor
T HE WOLVERINES brought down the curtain on one of their most
glorious seasons in style befitting a champion ofany endeavor.
At the annual Detroit alumni "bust" in the Motor City's Statler
Hotel Wednesday night, the men of Michigan, the team, the coaches,
the University provost, and the entire staff were on display for all ad-
miring alums to behold...
And what they saw was inspiring...
For five hours they talked Michigan and sung its praises to the
sky...
Every senior who received his M ring award at the banquet had
appreciation written on his face and sincerity in his voice.. .
You could sense that this was one of the most inportant mo-
ments in each one of their lives . . . it was the end of the long
gridiron trail at Michigan, a grand and glorious trail...
To Pete Elliott went the distinction of being the only Michigan
athlete ever to win twelve varsity letters and in doing so having trav-
eled more than 75,000 miles from coast to coast.
To Dan Dworsky and Ed McNeill went the scholarship awards,
.initiated by a group of Fisher Body men, consisting of 1,000 bucks
apiece for their B plus averages...
Also to Dworsky went the honor of telling the funniest joke
of the evening about a nervous alligator and a little boy...
TO GENE DERRICOTTE went the evening's most stirring tributes
and the biggest ovations-the guy who has been playing second
fiddle for four years was the number one man that night.. .
Joe Soboleski bowed out with an explanation of why he had trans-
ferred this year from guard to tackle . . . he said he had hoped, but
to no avail, that for once in his football career he wouldn't have to
room with Quent Sickles.
Sickles told one on friend Joe in retaliation. .
All American Dick Rifenburg was impressive in his sin-
cerity as was All-conference tackle Ralph Kohl...
Captain Dom Tomasi handed over the responsibilities of leading
the 1949 Wolverines to Al Wistert whom he dubbed "the Satchel
Paige of football."
Charlie Ortmann put on a brilliant display of post-season form
tossing a perfect strike to a spectator at the other end of the hall with
a door-prize pigskin. . . Toastmaster Jim Brieske almost broke a huge
mirror in a previous attempt.. .
To Brieske also went the honor of making the most stinging
remark, introducing athletic Director Fritz Crisler as "Mr. Crisler
-you remember him, he used to coach football."
Coach of the year Oosterbaan made what was easily the best
speech of the evening . . he won the respect and admiration of
all in attendance . . . besides becoming the nation's top coach, he has
developed into an outstanding after-dinner speaker. . . .

Seasoned Quintet To Start in Opener
____________________________,

Suprunowicz, Roberts Lead'
Michigan Against Spartans
0>

Wings Foil Puckster Attack;
'M' Defense Lacks Punch

(Continued from Page 1)
Against this lineup of talent,
Coach Ben Van Alstyne will send
a strong Spartan cage squad bol-
stered by Bill Rapchak, guard, andt
king size (6'8") Jack Wulf at cen-
ter.
Rapchak can be remembered forI
his hand in the Spartan's mid-sea-
son defeat of the Wolverines last1
year. -
Although lacking in height (thel
Wolverines will rule in this respect
at four of the starting positions)
Van Alstyne can point to the
speed and ball handling of his
SPORTS
B. S. BROWN, Night Editor
squad which overpowered Albion
and Hillsdale College in the same
night with 52-42 and 43-36 wins
respectively.
State will be out to seek its
eighteenth win in the 53 game se-
ries.
M' Jayvees Play
Spartans Today
AS AN APPETIZER for to-
night's varsity game, the Wol-
verine jayvees swing -into action
this afternoon against the Mich-
igan State junior varsity, starting
at 3 p.m. on the Yost Field House
court.-
For the past few weeks the
jayvees have been working with
the varsity squad under the di-
rection of coach Ernie McCoy and
freshman mentor Dave Strack. As
Beg Pardon!
There was a serious error
committed yesterday in con-
nection with Fraternity Volley-
ball. Sigma Phi Epsilon defeat-
ed Delta Upsilon, 2-0, and not
vice-versa as stated in yester-
day's issue.

yet, no jayvee coach has been
chosen.
S * * *
A FEW HOLDOVERS from last
year will be counted on heavily
this afternoon. Ted Berce, for-1
ward, denters Bud Royce and
George Poretta will be compli-
mented by sophomores Bill Eg-
genberger, a forward, and guards
Les Popp and Bill Agre.
From the football fields turn
Dick Rifenburg, Chuck Ortmann,
Jerry Burns and Pete Palmer.
Only ID cards are necessary at
the doors.
Probable Lineups
MICHIGAN MICH. STATE
Suprunowicz ... F..... Granack
McCaslin ......F..... Papchak,
Roberts .......C. ..........Wulf
Harrison ...... G...... Dawson
Morrill ........G...... Robbins

BILL ROBERTS
. starting center

Michigan Natators Give
Prep Exhibition Tonight

Fans of Distinction
LOS ANGELES - (/P) - It's
illegal this year to drink during a
football game in Memorial Coli-
seum.
So, City Council President Har-
old Henry reported yesterday,
cleanup men are hauling away
only half a truckload of empty'
whisky bottles after each game.
Last year the average was a full
truckload.

Late Results

11

By DAVE MILLER
Fourteen members of Matt
Mann's 1949 edition, of the Michi-
gan swimming team will put on an
exhibition tonight for the Erie,
Pennsylvania, High School Associ-
ation at the Erie Strong-Vincent
High School pool.
Erie has long been a center of
swimming interest and the towns-
people always turn out in great
numbers to watch the crack high
school teams in action. The city on
the shore of Lake Erie has pro-
duced many fine swimmers who
have later gone on to achieve
fame in the college ranks. '
Among the well-known gradu-
ates of the Erie pools are Achil-
les Pulakus, star freestyler of
the 1944 Wolverines, Jim Duke
of the present Michigan State
squad, and Jack Arbuckle, soph-
omore backstroker of the Maize
and Blue mermen.
Pulakus' father, an ardent fol-
lower of the sport, has been in-
strumental in getting the Wolver-
ines to put on this exhibition.
Erie's citizens have been eargerly

awaiting the arrival of the 1948
NCAA Champs.
The show will give Coach
Mann an opporeunity to ob-
serve the sophomore members
of the squad under fire for the
first time. The backstroke con-
tingent consists of three sophs,
and the outcome of tonight's
race may well help in the final
selection of starting assign-
ments.
Besides Arbuckle, newcomers
Tom Smith and Bernie Kahn will
be out to replace Michigan's great
erstwhile captain, Harry Holiday.
Interest in the diving event
will center around Ralph Trim-
born, current number one diver,
and sophomores George Eyster
and Frank Keller.
Co-captain Bob Sosh heads the
group of breaststrokers. His com-
petition will consist of veterans
Bill Upthegrove and Charlie Moss.
The freestylers include Matt Mann
III, Gus Stager, Bill Kogen, John
McCarthy, and sophomore Bob
Byberg.

BASKETBALL
Illinois 67, Butler 62
Colgate 99, University of Toronto
30
S.M.U. 57, Texas Tech 45
Utah 62, Idaho 39
Lawrence Tech 55, Carnegie Tech
44
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Richmond 27, Rollins 27
Vanderbilt 33, Miami 6

By B. S. BROWN
You couldn'tNhelp smiling
Thursday night when the Red
Wings put on an Olsen and John-
son version of hodkey at Mich-
igan's Coliseum.
But there was a serious side to
the performance, when you scon-
sider Michigan's role in the de-
bacle.
NO ONE COULD have serious-
ly walked into the rink expecting
a Wolverine victory, but those
who saw last year's team roar
through its season losing only two
games and climax the season by
grabbing the NCAA crown at Col-
orado Springs, could have right-
fully looked for a better showing
by the almost all-veteran squad.
In the first period, the Wings,
shooting at their ace goalie,
Harry Lumley, who was mind-
ing the Michigan nets, racked
up eight goals with almost ri-
diculous ease. No matter how
great the Wings are, and there's
no comparing them with the
Wolverines, it shouldn't have
been that easy.
Last year, the Wings tallied just
twice in the first period.
* *, *
THERE WERE two apparent
shortcomings with the Michigan
team, and they are as basic as
team, and they are as basic to the
ice sport as is a football to the
gridiron game.
First, Michigan's defense was
sad. And it was not the fault
of the defensemen. True, on
many occasions Wing players
faked Ross Smith, Connie Hill,
Dick Starrak and Bill Fleming
out of position and skated
around them to go in on goal.
But the main fault was that the
forwards failed to pick up the
Wing rushers whom the defense-
men didn't intercept. There are
only two defensemen, but there
are at least three and often five
men coming in on a rush.
YET CONSISTENTLY, the
Michigan defensemen were al
alone. They had to stave off a
four or five man attack, and it
just couldn't be done.
Even in the second and third
periods, when Jack Stewart and
Bill Quackenbush were on de-
fense for Michigan, the Wings
got more shots in on goal than
the Wolverines. And very often
in those final two stanzas, the
Wing line consisted of Michi-
gan's Wally Grant, Neil Celley
and Gil Burford, who had
donned Detroit jerseys in the
second and third periods.
Jack MacDonald, who was ir
the Detroit nets, had an almost
dull evening. True, he came u
with some brilliant saves, but fo
the most part, his most exerting
feat was the chewing of a huge
wad of gum.
* * *
IN ALL, the Minnesota-bor
goalie made only sixteen saves
HOLIDAY
An Adventure in
~ Good Smoking
"ae
1b Y 'O':.*

And from that, it is easy to
see that the other basic fault
with the Michigan team was its
attack.hThe passing was poor
and the shooting was even
worse.
Except for Al Renfrew's amaz-
ing 20-footer and Wally Gacek's
close-in shot, both in the second
period, there was very little close'
to an accurate flip.
Irish Favored
over Trojans
LOS ANGELES-(P)-Southern
California's loyal Trojan rooters
hit a high pitch in their Home-
coming celebration today, fully
aware that the party may flatten
out along about sundown after
the football team finishes its en-
counter with Notre Dame.
Coach -Frank Leahy brought his
squad in from South Bend yester-
day morning, and gave them a lim-
bering up in the afternoon.
Notre Dame is rated at least
20-point favorites to wind up their
second grid season in a row with-
out a blemish on the record, and
their 28th consecutive game with-
out a defeat.

Wolverines
Break Two
Grid Marssn
Records Made
Just a couple passing notes be-
fore dropping the back cover on
the 1948 football year book.
1) MICHIGAN established two
Conference records. The Wolver-
ine defense held six Big Nine at-
tacks to a 70.2 yard average per
game, bettering the Minnesotai
mark of 88 ypg.
2) MICHIGAN SHATTERED its
own passing record of 145.5 set in
1946 when Bob Chappuis limbered
up his right wing every Saturday.
With ten backs involved in this
year's aerial circus, headed by
sophomore Chuck Ortmann, the
Wolverines averaged 151 ypg.
3) FOR THE SECOND straight
season, a Michigan place-kicking
specialist wound up as the Big
Nine individual scoring leader.
Following the footsteps of Jim
Brieske, Harry Allis captured the
title. He netted 40 points with 22
placements and 3 touchdowns.
4) ORTMANN MADE an auspi-
cious debut by taking the coveted
passing crown, completing 29 out
of 59 passes for 547 yards.

FRANK DAILEY'S
MEADOW BROOK
Cedar Grove, N.J.
MIC HIGAN NIG H T
December 27, 1948
RAY McKINLEY
and his orchestra
For Information and Reservations --
CONSULT: AL BECKER - Phone 2-1 349
Route 23 Newark - Pompton Turnpike
Verona 8-1914 Little Falls 4-0110

Harrison, Elliott, Morrill To Lead Defense

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By SY SONKIN
Last year, basketball experts
credited Michigan with having the
best guards in the Big Nine, and
their beliefs were made increasing-
ly stronger as the season wore on.
When the season ended, the two
starters, Bob Harrison and Pete
Elliott, were awarded the guard
posts on the All-Conference five.
* * *
THESE TWO, along with Hal
Morrill, will provide the Big Nine
champs with a potent defense
again, a fact sure to gladden the

- E

heart of the new cage mentor,
Ernie McCoy.
The fact that Harrison and
Elliott made the All-Big Nine
team speaks fairly well for the
kind of play to which they
treated the crowds every week.
But in the game against Iowa
last year, it was Morrill's terrific
defensive play that caught the
eye of the gallery.
WITH THE Wolverines ahead
by eight points, the substitute
guard from Flint came up with
two successive interceptions of
court-length passes intended for
the Hawkeyes' pint-sized seige
gun, Murray Weir.
Then he completely took over
control of both backboards as
he captured one rebound after
another.
Morrill definitely established'
himself in that game, but, unfor-
tunately for him, he's bucking
against two of the finest guards
in the Conference.
* * *
THE VERSATILE Elliott's value
to the team was well demonstrated
last year. He didn't play in the
first six . games (all non-Confer-
ence), and the Wolverines gained
an even split.
During the rest of the year,
Michigan won 12 contests out
of 14 played, and, in most of

them it fell to Pete to stop the
opposition's offensive "hotshot."
While applying the damper to
the enemies' artillery, the Bloom-
ington, Ill., senior also found time
to drop in a few points for himself,
and ended the season with 74
points.
HARRISON PLAYED a stand-
out game offensively and defen-
sively for the Wolverines all year.
Now playing his fourth and
final season of varsity basket-
ball, Bob had the honor of cap-
taining the first Michigan five
to take the Big Nine cage crown
since 1927.
And his play proved to all that
he earned it. Besides his excellent
work under the Michigan basket,
he racked up 140 points in Con-
ference play, only five behind
Mack Suprunowicz, the team's
leader.
These three, in great measure,
accounted for the fact that oifty
556 points were scored against the
Wolverines by all Big Nine op-
ponents last year, the best rec-
ord in the Conference. Upon them
Michigan's fortunes this year de-
pend to a great extent.
DO YOU KNOW. . . that Mich-
igan has been ranked in the first
ten teams nationally for the last
nine years.

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