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December 01, 1948 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


m

wrEDNESDAY, flECFAI1EPR1, 0,1.8

THlE MIC:HIGAN DAILY

PACE TI-TR F r,

-- - -------

1 1

5rom 4de
GRANISTAND
By MURRAY GRANT . .. Daily Sports Editor
W ITH EVERY KIND of "All" team except an "All-Lefthanded
Grandfathers" coming out at about this time it was with a
great deal of satisfaction that we noticed a progressive step being
taken.
The International News Service (INS) has done something that
should have started long ago. They've named not one team, but two
elevens having equal strength. This may sound like merely a con-
tinuation of the long list of All-Anythings-but it isn't.
The INS has taken cognizance of the two-team-system, start-
ed here at Michigan and now spreading throughout the country.
They've come up with both a DEFENSIVE All-American as well
as an OFFENSIVE team. And
it's about time.
The game of football is no*
onger the sixty-minute, do-or- 'v";: " ': ....
drop struggle of the '20's and '30's..
Ake everything else it has become
specialized field where certain
men are delegated certain tasks
and they work at those tasks until
they become highly proficient.
It all started with the place-
kicking specialist. A few years
back one man would trot on the
field after every touchdown and
calmly boot the hapless pigskin'
squarely between the goal posts.
Then the pro outfits began to '
go to work on this specialization
business. And it paid off. The Chi-
eago Bears, one of the first to
use specialists, were invincible
ror a while until the other teams DICK RIFENBURG
began to catch on.*
HIS "NEW ERA" came to college football in a grand manner
with the Michigan "two-team system" devised by Fritz Crisler.
[t was carried on by freshman mentor Bennie Oosterbaan this year
and it spread to such schools as Army with "Red" Blaik's two-pla-
boons.
Other top teams have developed variations on this theme by
Crisler and instead of "eleven iron men" of yore we now have
15 or 18 or even 22 men who have special tasks and who make the
football field often like a shuttle bus system.
INS has named Wolverine Dick Rifenburg to their offensive
eleven and Pete Elliott, Michigan's only 60-minute man, to their
defensive team.
They've placed Norm Van Brocklin of Oregon, who was a
truly great performer all season offensively, but was weak on
defense, in the score-producing unit. With Van Brocklin are
highly-touted offensive stars, who don't stick around much when
the defensive work is to be done. Clyde Scott of Arkansas, Jackie
Jensen, the California blaster and Choo-Choo Charley Justice,
the North Carolina Express.
Up in the line along with Rifenburg are Sam Tamburo of Penn
State on the ends, Lauri Niemi, Washington State, and Paul Lea,
Tulane, at tackles; Joe Henry of Army's two-platoons and Leo No-
rnellini, a titan on offense from Minnesota, at guards; and Charley
Bednarik of Pennsylvania at center.

Walker Picked
For Heisman
Trophy Award
Rifenburg S upported
In Mid West, Voting
NEW YORK - (P) - Doak
Walker of Southern Methodist has
been selected as winner of the
Heisman Trophysas the year's out-
standing college football player,
it was announced today.
Walker, an All-America half-
back in 1947 and strong contender
for repeat honors this season, will
be awarded the Heisman Memo-
rial Trophy by the Downtown
Athletic Club of New York, Dec.
7.
First Junior ever to win the
trophy since it was inaugurated
in 1935, Walker won with a total
of 778 votes of the nation's sports
writers and broadcasters.
Second, with 443 votes, was
North Carolina's Charlie Justice,
while Chuck Bednarik of Pennsyl-
SPORTS
HERB RUSKIN, NIGHT EDITOR
vania was third with 336 votes.
Others were Jackie Jensen, Cali-
fornia, 143; Stan Heath, Nevada,
113; Norman Van Brocklin, Ore-
gon, 83, Emil Sitko, Notre Dame,
73; and Jack Mitchell, Oklahoma,
68.
The vote leaders by sections:
East-Bednarik, Walker, Justice,
Sitko, Heath; South - Justice,
Walker, Bednarik, Heath, Sitko;
Midwest-Walker, Justice, Bed-
narik, DICK RIFENBURG, MICH-
IGAN; Sitko; Southwest-Walk-
er, Justice, Mitchell, Bednarik,
Jensen; Far West--Walker, Jen-
sen, Van Brocklin, Justice, Heath.

Wolverine Cagers
Op en Against MSC
MeCoy's Hardwood Champions
Aim To Retain Conference Crown

Wolverine Pucksters Vie

By ROG GOELZ
Barring the appearance of
Northwestern in the annual Rose
Bowl Classic on New Year's Day,
the Western Conference has
wrapped up another football sea-
son in the record books and turned
its attention to basketball.
The 1948-49 season promises to
be heightened by the return of ex-
perienced court veterans, a fact
which has led Big Nine observers
to predict a high scoring year with
all teams paced by tall cagers.
MICHIGAN, conference cham-
pions will be out to repeat the
football squad's title retention
under the direction of a new
coach, Ernest B. McCoy.
McCoy is not new to basket-
ball at Michigan, nor to the
athletic setup having served
under "Fritz" Crisler as assistant
athletic director and chief foot-
ball scout.
Michigan will start its defense
of the Big Nine Title with ten re-
turning lettermen plus a number
of outstanding frosh prospects.
Chuck Ortman has also reported
for practice to bolster the Wolver-
ine attack.
* * *
McCOY IS EXPECTED to face
the Spartans of Michigan State
on December 4th with a squad
composed of Mack Suprunowicz
and Boyd McCaslin at forwards,
Bob Harrison and Pete Elliott at
guards and Don Roberts at center.
The other conference schools
have an equally impressive list
of returning players. Only
Northwestern and Iowa are
short handed in experience. The
Hawkeyes have only one return-
ing regular while the Wildcats

have two. Both schools however
have sufficient sophomore
strength to offset these losses.
Eight of the Big Nine's leading
scorers are going into action this
year. Murray Wier, power scorer
of Iowa is the principle casualty.
Last year's all-conference squad
will be back minus only Wier.
* * *
FANS WILL TURN their eyes
in the direction of Minnesota
where Ozzie Cowles, producer of a
champion at Michigan in two
years takes over the cage set up
at Minneapolis.
Cowles' hopes for a repetition
will be bolstered by the Goph-
er's veteran center, Jim McIn-
tyre and Whitey Skook promis-
ing pick up from the frosh squad.
Illinois will be paced by Dwight
Eddleman and Dick Foley and are
counting on the performance of
newcomers Ted Beach, and Don
Sunderlage.
MONTGOMERY, Ala.-(iP)-
Michigan's defensive center
Dan Dworsky has been named
to the North squad in the an-
nual Blue-Gray game to be
played here Christmas Day.

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W ith Detroit Red Wings
Teams To Exchange Goalies and Forward
Lines; 'M' Sends Veteran Squad Into Fray
Sounds of skates on the ice and son while Celley is a veteran of
pucks rattling off the boards of the 1945-46 campaign.
:he Coliseum show give evidence: k
that the National Championship ON DEFENSE, the veteran Con-
M~ichigan Hockey squad is near- nie Hill, Dick Starrak, Ross Smith"
.ng the peak of their preparations and John Griffin will attempt to
for the exhibition contest with keep opposing forwards away
the Detroit Red Wings at 8:00 from goalie Jack McDonald.
p.m. tomorrow evening. In the Red Wing fray, the
Only two players, Ted Greer two teams will exchange goalies
and Bill Jacobson, bith forwards, and two forward lines at the
are missing from the team that start of the second period. With
won 18 games, lost two and tied this system, the Wolverines were
:ne last season. 9-7 victors over the Red Wings
* * * last year avenging the 7-5 loss
AS A CLIMAX, the pucksters handed them by the Detroiters
went to the NCAA tournament at in 1946.
Colorado Springs, Colorado in Tickets for the contest are still
March and defeated Boston Col- available at the Athletic Admin-
lege and Dartmouth for the Na- istration Building and students
tional title. Entering 28th sea- must present their identification
son of hockey competition, the cards at the time of purchase.

ERNIE McCOY
. cage general

1.50-Pounders
Pick Leaders
Fullback Bud Marshall and
tackle Barry'Breakey were select-
ed yesterday to co-captain the
1949 Wolverine lightweights.
Marshall paced the 1948 team in
scoring while Breakey has filled a
regular line berth for the past two,
seasons.
This year's captain, Don O'Con-
noll was chosen most valuable
player by his teammates.
Elwood Cushing, former basket-
ball star and an M man will spon-
sor a banquet for the 1948 letter-
men at the Union Friday at 8:30.I

Wolverines stand a good chance of
retaining their national crown.
The first line, consisting of
Captain Al Renfrew, Gordie Mc-
Millan and Wally Gacek, is con-
sidered by many the best for-
ward line in college hockey.
McMillan set a new Michigan
scoring record with 59 points
during the regular season's play
last year.
Wally Grant, Gil Burford and
Neil Celley compose the Wolver-
ine second forward line. Grant
played the second half of last sea-

Prof. Carver, well - known
Michigan billiards expert, will
meet everyone who is interested
in participating in intercolle-
giate billiards in the Union Bil-
liard Room at 3:30 this after-
noon. Those selected will be in-
structed by Prof. Carver, after
which the top men at Michigan
will be sent, all expenses paid,
to compete at Columbia Uni-
versity in New York with the
best college players in the na-
tion.

GLEE CLUB CONCERTS..

CHRISTMAS

DANCES . l ,ii''', "

NEW YEARS EVE. i j

IoTo -Nw
NIGHTOWLS-
4

VACATION HIGHLIGHT:
Olympic Games Feature
Students' Summer Tour,

* m :

*

E DEFENSIVE BACKFIELD is something to behold, too. For
along with Elliott the INS has put Doak Walker of SMU, George
Taliaferro of Indiana and .Bobby Gage of Clemson in this defensive
dream.
All Who saw the Michigan-Indiana tilt will attest to Talia-
ferro's defensive play and Walker is regarded as the best safety man
in the whole Southwest.
As linebacker the INS chose Alex Sarkisian of Northwestern,
though some might say Michigan's Dan Dworsky deserved the
nod. However, Sarkisian was a demon on defense all season and
he held the Wildcat line together in the all-important Notre Dame
clash.
At the defensive ends are Leon Hart of Notre Dame and Barney
"Old. Faithful" Poole of Mississippi; the tackles are Tim Turner of
California and, Bill Fischer of the Fighting Irish; whle the guard
posts are held by Bill Healy of Georgia Tech and Buddy Burris of
Oklahoma.
Whether you agree with the selections or not is not as im-
portant as the fact that someone has taken that progressive step
in the maze of "All-teams" that boost circulation.
Now all they have to do to make something out of this mess
s to have everyone that does the picking get together and come up
with TWO teams, one offensive and one defensive, that are accepted
as THE All-Americans.

r

By KENNY BIALKIN
By now the 1948 Olympics are
just a set of recorded figures,
quietly gathering dust and re-
ferred to occasionally by sports
writers and statisticians.
But to Dr. Elmer D. Mitchell of
the department of Physical Edu-
cation and a group of students,
the 1948 Olympic games provide
many moments of pleasurable
reminiscing.
CROSSING THE Atlantic for
the purpose of studying the sys-
tems oftphysical education in the
various countries of Europe, Dr.
Mitchell and his group received
first hand impressions travelling
through Italy, Switzerland, Hol-
land, Belgium, France, Scotland,
and England.
The high point of the tour
however, was watching Amer-
ican athletes in competition
with the top ranking athletes
from all parts of the globe.
After watching the Olympic
games, Dr. Mitchell makes some
interesting observations as to how
American athletes stack upj
against the world. According to
Dr. Mitchell, the 1948 Olympiad
demonstrated that American ath-
letes are much superior in the
short dashes, the high and low
hurdles, and the jumps.
IN ADDITION, Dr. Mitchell
noted, the Olympics demonstrated
the supremacy of the Negro ath-
letes in the short sprifits and
jumps. It seems that they have a
certain explosive effect which
gives the Negro sprinters the extra
burst of speed needed to win the
short events.
But when it comes to endur-
ance running, it is another
story entirely. Except for our
victory in the 1908 Marathon,
the United States has never
come close to winning any dis-
tance runs. Americans just don't
seem to want to train for the
endurance runs as do other for-
eign groups.
We must defer to the Finns and
the Swedes as well as almost every
other national group when it
comes to long distance competi-
tion.
* * *
THE UNIVERSITY of Michigan
was not unrepresented at the
Olympic games last summer.
Ralph Craig, a former Michigan
runner, had the distinction of
HOLIDAY
An Adventure in
( Good Smoking
I It

being the oldest competitor in the
games. Ralph, in addition to be-'
ing the flag bearer for the United
States was entered in the yacht-
ing competition.
In addition, another Mich-
igan runner, Herb Barten,
placed fourth in the 800 meter
run while Bob Sohl, co-captain
of the swimming team took
third in the 200 meter breast
stroke.
Dr. Mitchell, who conducted a
similar tour to the 1936 Olympics
in Berlin, could not refrain from
drawing some interesting compar-
isons between the two events. In
England last summer the attitude
was hospitable and informal, and
a spirit of international friend-
ship seemed to prevail.
Germany in 1936 however, was
quite different. The gneeral atmo-
sphere was coldly formal and effi-
cient with the Germans doing all
they could to impress the crowds'
with their machine-like methods.
ONE OF THE mos% pleasant
customs in the Olympics is that
whereby the whole crowd sings, in
unison, the national anthem of
the country winning each event.

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