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September 22, 1948 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TEN THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1941

s

HiGH SCHOOL FOR FEW:
Poor State Education Facilities Cited

LANSING -(P) - A Citizens'
Educational Study Committee was
told today that 80' per cent of
Michigan's school districts offer
only eighth grade education in
Michigan.
Dr. Lee M. Thurston, state su-
perintendent of public instruction,
opened the deliberations of the
special committee suggested by
Gov. Sigler with a review of the
state's educational program.
* * *
HE SAID that only Detroit of-

basis from early
through college.

childhood

Ninety per cent of the public
schools provide education below
the twelfth grade, he said.
The committee was named to
recommend school improvements
to the legislature.
IT RECEIVED a proposal that a
new state board of education be
established to combine the work of
the present board, the superin-

board of control of vocational edu-
cation, the teachers' tenure com-
mission and the teachers' retire-
ment fund board.
Experts told the committee
that major downstate areas had
a pressing problem in building
new schools but that the Upper
Peninsula had more classrooms
than it needed.
The committee will decide to-
morrow how far it should go in
proposing legislative reforms.

'ers education on a community tendent of public instruction, the

D)river Gets

A.

'"""" I

I

I

You will find a ivelco1e at the
Grace Bible Chiirch
State and Huron Streets
"T he Friendly Church where the Gosplw
is Preached."
Sunday-10:00 A.M. University Bible Class
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship
6:30 P.M. Guild Supper
7:30 P.M. Everting Service

ReadingHint
A certain truck driver may read

signs more carefully the next time
he attempts to pass under a via-
duct.
The complete roof of a. semi-
truck was ripped from its body as
it tried to pass under a viaduct on
W. Washington avenue Monday
afternoon.
The driver of the conveyance,
part of the Maryland Carnival
group to open soon at Sportsman's
Park, rapidly learned the approx-
imate height of his truck when it
failed to sneak under the clearly,
marked 12 ft. 8 in. under-pass.
Two of the six passengers were
taken to St. Joseph's Hospital but
suffered only minor injuries.

War Threat
In Berlin
Faces Allties
Negotiation Fails
To End Blockade
By J. M. ROBERTS, JR..
AP Foreign Affairs Analyst
BERLIN-The situation in Ber-
lin contains the strong possibility
that the Western Allies will soon
face a decision as to whether they
want to risk war with Russia, now
or later.
The allied representatives here
who seek to end the Berlin block-
ade by negotiation naturally are
not going to admit dispair. But
I cannot find one glimmer of hope
that negotiation will bring an end
to the East-West war for control
of Germany. Any relaxation of the
blockade would merely mean a
slight tactical change on the over-
all picture.
THE RUSSIANS are out for
control of all Germany. The Co-
munists would soon be back at our
throats with some other tactic or
on some other front. They are
conducting a fanatical campaign.
As long as their policies remain
unchanged and their dynamism
unchecked, the conflict will go on.
THE BRITISH and French, ac-
cording to a highly authoritative
non-American source, consider
continued operation of the air lift'
as a definite threat to peace. This
analyst recently made three points
in reporting the situation to his
government.
1-The danger of war can be
avoided only by a four-power ap-
proach-such as has been under
way-to the Berlin problem, with
lifting of the blockade as the prin-
cipal objective.
2-If the Western Powers con-
tinue indefinitely to operate the
air lift, incidents are bound to
develop which would cause war.
3-An attempt to break the
blockade with armed ground con-
voys would produce immediate
war.
SINCE THIS report was made,
developments have dimmed most
hopes on the first point. On the
second point, we can only wait
and see what Russia is willing to
take. The American belief here is
that, if we ourselves are prepared
to take the risk of war, peace can
be preserved, lift or no lift.
On the third point, there is no
longer much discussion. Some
Americans still feel that, given
sufficient notice in which to with-
draw to a face-saving position, the
Russians would not open fire on
convoys. But the emphasis now
is on getting the job done through
the air lift.
If the Russians try to interfere
with that, if we come to. the point
where we either have to put up
fighters to protect the cargo
planes or get out of Berlin, then
America will have come to what
might very well prove the final
cast of the die.

IJROTHER, CAN YOU SPARE A DIME?
HCL Forces Record Total of Students To Seek Jobs

By BOB WHITE, Daily Special Writer
A record number of hard-pressed students is finding that a day's
work this fall doesn't end with their last class.
It appears, according to University personnel officials, that the
HCL, teamed with dwindling G.I. subsistence, has hit many a student
pocketbook - and hard.
Family Additions
In addition, many post-war college students find themselves with
more mouths to feed than their own.
And while the number of applications for jobs has shot upward,.
corresponding opportunities for work have shown a decline from early
post-war peaks.
Alfred B. Ueker, University personnel officer, said that about 400
students had applied to his bureau since the beginning of September.
Few Jobs
At the same time, he continued, only slightly more than 100 jobs
have been offered. Even though a few of the available jobs require
more than one worker, it is unlikely, he said, that the ratio of oppli-
cants to opportunities will be much better than three to one.
On the brighter side, Ueker reported that over-all earnings, in
"JUST GOOD FOOD"
at the Wolverine DEN

CLASSIC FAVORITES

terms of wage rates, have shown an increase from immediate post
war figures.
"Placing students in jobs that fit them is not entirely lacking ir
humor," Ueker commented. He cited a recent order calling for "young
men of about average athletic prowess and manly physique to serve
as models for an art class."
Righteous Indignation
The most frequent reactions to that particular offer, he said
were righteous indignation and embarrassment, or both.
Each applicant is interviewed one or more times at the personne
office in University Hall, and an effort is made to fit students in jobs
they will like and can perform well, Ueker explained.
For many students, he said, part-time work this year will providt
the critical difference between sufficient and insufficient funds fo]
continuing education.

i

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BEETHOVEN

Good Food

Good Service

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EAT AT THE DEN
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BRAHMS
DVORAK

Piano Concerto No. 4, in G
Piano Concerto No. 5, in E flat
Schnabel, Stock and the Chicago Orch.
Symphony No. 6 in F (Pastoral)
Toscanini and the BBC Orchestra
Symphony No. 1 in C
Tragic Overture
Toscanini and the BBC Orchestra
Symphony No. 5 in E minor
Stokowski and the Philadelphia Orchestra
Cello Concerto in B minor
Casals, Szell and the Czech Philharmonic
The Sorcerer's Apprentice
Sokowski and the Philadelphia Orchestra

HAROLD J. DeVRIES, Pastor

Phone 2-1121

Barbed wire fence, an excellent
conductor of lightning, was re-
sponsible for the deaths of over*
4,000 livestock who ran into these
fences during thunder showers.
-Encyclopedia Americana

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Tannhauser Overture and Venusberg Music
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