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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 22, 1948 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

fEDAY, NOVEMBER 17, i

M

Weather May Cause Serious Trouble

At least part of the series, the
National League part, is a cineli
to be played in Boston, where ii
has been known to get right crips,
and rainy, in the fall. No matter
where the series is played at that
date, though, it might run into
tough weather.
The major leagues had one bad
experience with a late start. That
start, in 1911, really was late,
he first game being scheduled
Oct. 14 as the National League
season didn't end until Oct. 12.
The Athletics and Giants were the
rivals.
The series was held up a full
week between the third and
fourth games, and consecutively
did not end until Oct. 26.
Such a postponement would be
a boon to the Braves. Johnny Sam
and Warren Spahn could pitch
the the whole series.
The new national singles cham-
pion, Richard "Pancho" Gonzales,
could be just what the doctor or-
dered to put more life in amateur
tennis.
THE GOAT'S NEST
CERAMIC STUDIO
U announces registration for
fall classes starting Sept. 21.
Studio privileges available
Qwith consultation and in-
struction by Harvey Little-
ton. Student's work now on
exhibit. Studio hours: after-
noons from 1-4; Wed. and
Thurs. Eve's. 7-9.
512 South Main St.
Ann Arbor, Phone 4970
A

The big kid has a certain color,
plays the smashing type game
that appeals to the gallery. He is
a natural, a tennis Joe DiMaggio.
He has that smooth-flowing power
that makes his movements seem
unhurried, almost lanquid, but he
covers an amazing lot of territory.
Only 20, heshould be up there a
long time.
* * *
Should the Red Sox win out in
the American League, the luckiest
guy in baseball will be Junior
Stephens, the fine Boston short-
stop.
Doubly lucky, you might say. It
was a lucky day for him when he
leap-frogged back over the bor-
der after changing his mind about
joining the Mexican League,
which officially folded its tent a
couple of days ago. And his sec-
ond piece of luck came in being
swapped, or sold, to the RedSox
by the Browns.
* * *
Mrs. Margaret Dupont and Lou-
ise Brough were playing the finals
of the Women's National Tennis
Singles at Forest Hills. They
were well matched, practically al-
ternating in winning games, and
withtwhat the weatherman calls
scattered showers interrupting
play a couple of times, it seemed
the match would proceed indefi-
nitely.
The gals were interesting to
watch, but enough was enough,
and when the third set reached a
13-13 count, an exasperated fan
who obviously came to see the
men's singles finaj which fol-
lowed, muttered:
"Let 'em cut the cup in half."
The tennis officials, and base-
ball officials, too, for that matter,
make an error in timing bynot al-
lowing for prolonged games. Too
many ball games are called be-
cause of darkness. Why they
have a rule prohibiting the turn-
ing on of lights is a mystery.
3 *
With several days to go, the
Major Leagues already have shat-
tered their attendance records.
The players looking over that big
field of fresh cabbage are pretty
certain to figure that they want
some, and if the clubs don't vol-
untarily boost salaries next year
there's going to be a tidal wave
of holdouts. The owners had bet-
ter start figuring how they can
prove they aren't hearts of gold.
Just gilded a little.
Faculty Man
NamedEditor
Prof. Karl Litzenberg of the
English Department has been ap-
pointed to the editorial board of
the "Annual Victorian Bibliog-
raphy," which is sponsored by the
Modern Language Association of
America.
Prof. Litzenberg, a specialist in
Victorian literature and in the re-
lations between English and Scan-
dinavian literature, is the author
of numerous articles in these
fields. He succeeds the late Prof.
Charles F. Harrold, of Ohio State
University, on the editorial board.
The "Bibliography" lists all cur-
rent works in the Victorian field
and evaluates important contribu-

Student veterans whose depend-
ency status changed during the
summer vacation are reminded by
the Veterans Administration to
submit proof of additional depend-
ency as soon as possible to the
appropriate VA regional office in
which their records are filed.
Until legal proof, sucn as cer-
tified copies of public records of
birth, baptism, marriage, divorce
or other evidence is in their VA
training files, veterans cannot
qualify for additional subsistence
payments.
World War II veterans still may
reinstate their National Service
Life Insurance, according to VA
branch office officials in Colum-
bus, Ohio.
Veterans who suspend their
training during a regular semester
will receive subsistence for the re-
mainder of the month during
which they drop out. However, if
they suspend training after the
last day upon which classes may
be dropped without permission,
the VA will deduct an entire se-
mester from their eligibility.

Old Volume in 'U' Library
Gives Tips to Blues Singers
Today's singers of the "blues" might well take a look at an early
17th century volume in the University of Michigan library, titled "The
Anatomy of Melancholy."
This analysis of melancholy-"the Kindes, Causes, Symptomes,
Prognosticks, and severall Cures of it"-is one of a number of English
books now being exhibited in the University General library. All books
on exhibit are first or other early editions.
Twentieth century students will doubtless agree with the 17th
century writer on melancholy, who declared that this "anguish of the
mind is a plague of students, for study weakens their bodies, dulls
their spirits, abates their strength and courage."
~R
0HOME of GOOD FOOD
418 East Washington
Phone 9717
serving
Q FAMILY-STYLE DINNERS
Lunch 11:30 A.M. to 1:30 P.M.
also
High Class SMORGASBORD v
o (Come and eat all you want)
a Daily, except Friday, 11:30 to 1:30 and 5:00 to 8:00 P.M.
Sunday, 12 Noon to 6:00 P.M.
Catering to Wedding Breakfast and Bridge Clubs

...,
A.

HURRICANE FLAGS GO UP-Hurricane flags go up in Miami,
Fla., warning the folks from Miami to Key West of the oncoming
hurricane. Emergency hurricane measures should be taken im-
mediately in the Florida Keys and the greater Miami area, the
weather bureau advised. Storm warnings were displayed north-
ward from Miami to Melbourne on the east coast, and from the
Keys to Naples on the west coast.
~ - - - - --- - - --- -- - - - -
TOWARD NOV. 2:
rof. Slosson To Carry On
Campaign for House Seat
Prof. Preston W. Slosson of the history department is taking no
rest from the concentrated campaign which recently netted him the
Democratic nomination for Congressman from the Second Congres-
sional district.
Following up the 28 speeches given before groups in this area be-
fore the primaries, he has accepted an invitation to participate in a
panel discussion before the Jackson Junior Chamber of Commerce
October 7.
He will also speak in Monroe October 29, and plans to speak in
most of the towns in Washtenaw, Jackson, Monroe, and Lenawee
counties, which comprise the Second Congressional district.
Slosson, who received assurances of support last Friday from the
state CIO and G. Mennen Williams, Democratic nominee for governor,
plans to continue his novel campaigning by telephone. Using this
method. scores of Slosson workers called residential telephones before
the primaries and, after introducing the professor, played a recorded
one-minute talk by Slosson. These workers expect to make 30,000
such calls before general election November 2.
During the primary campaign, Slosson came out strongly in favor
of President Truman's national position on the Taft-Hartley Law,
civil rights, housing, health insurance, and education. Prof. Slosson
also plans to attack Rep. Earl C. Michener, his Republican opponent,
for "his absence whenever a vote was taken in Congress on an impor-
tant national issue," according to Tom Walsh, Slosson's publicity
chairman.

r

a
fib=

TO THE CAMPUS NEWCOMER
We offer the following
P H ILCO RAD IOS
HALLICRAFTER RADIOS
PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES
AMATEUR RADIO SUPPLIES,
Our store is convenient to campus - Come in and visit u's
Purchase Radio & Camera Shop
Church at South University Phone 8696
W8BEO - W8RP - W8WOJ

Continuous
from 1 P.M.

COOL

LAST TIMES
TODAY!
CLEAR THE
. }

E DECKS FOR ACTION AND LAUGHTER!

with Walt
R TS THURSDAY-

{

Pi

STAR

i

Survey Heps
New Lawyers
Help in locating a place to
hang out his shingle will be given
to the young Michigan lawyer or
law school graduate by a newly
published "Survey of Conditions
in the Practice of Law."
The publication was prepared
by the Junior Bar of Michigan in
cooperation with the University
of Michigan Law School. Robert
H. Hosick, of Kalamazoo, served
as chairman of the survey com-
mittee, with Charles W. Joiner,
assistant professor of law at the
University, as vice-chairman.
The survey is a county-by-
county study of the state, indicat-
ing possibilities of a successful
law practice in each.
The1

'

II

--

T "Y '

means

.2 tions on the subject.

_____--

l

The
WOLVERINE
DEN1

* for all veterans
" for all races
* for all nations
And AVC means business, locally and nationally.
Here's the box score:

is
for

now available
Parties
Luncheons
Dances

Weddings
Clubs
or any social event.
0
FULL COURSE
DINNERS'
a la carte
Recorded Music
or Bands
furnished
0
Make Your
Arrangements Now!
for OPEN DATES
and RATES
PHONE 9448
Joe Tomita, Mgr,

CAMPUS CHAPTER
SUMMER 1948:
* Initiated vacations for veterans at Fresh
Air Camp
0 Donated 175 books to Veterans
Readjustment Center
0 Sponsored eyewitness report from under-
ground Franco Spain
0 Sponsored banquet on Palestine
* Conducted discussion by expert on therapy
for veterans

CAMPUS CHAPTER'
FALL 1948:
* Group discussion on "Campus GI" tonight
* Forum on civil liberties
* Town Hall lectures
9 Important movies like "To Live in Peace"
* Parties and rallies

'.A

r

INITIAL FALL MEETING
Trnrinrik* * R

AVC, Rm. 306, Michigan Union
D Please put me on AVC's mailing list
for future lectures and movies.
I'd like more information on AVC.

1
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