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November 16, 1948 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1948
aried
By B. S. BROWN
Jimmy Durante once shook his
head sadly and growled, "Every-
one wants to get into the act."
That must have expressed the
sentiments of Indiana coach Clyde
Smith last Saturday when he
watched no less than eight dif-
ferent Wolverines cross that final
stripe.
AND IT SEEMS almost like
adding insult to injury when you
recall that the Hoosiers had just
about a one man team. In the first
half, it was all George "triple-
threat" Taliaferro and in the last
two stanzas, all Del Russell.
Tom Peterson, Michigan's
hard-hitting fullback, kept his
mitts on the number one Wol-
verine scoring position when he
I plunged over for his eighth TD of
the campaign midway in the
first period. In addition, Peter-
son has one conversion to his
credit.
That one point, which came
,against MSC in the first game of

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THME

- -- - ---.~-.~~-~---- '----- --- - ___________________ ________________________ a

Offense Downs Indiana

Lightweight Rally Makes
Coach Keen Very Happy
O'Connell Paces Trenendous Line Play;
Ryan,_Marshall Shine in Midget Backfield

Six of them came on the third
Michigan touchdown when he
ook a pass from Chuck Ortmanr.
in the three and bulled his Wa
over.
"CHUCKIN' CHUCK" had
uite a day against the HoosierE
himself and, had it not been for
the valiant effort tossed in by tht
amazing Mr. Taliaferro, would
lave easily stood out as the clas-
siest back on the field. The soph-
omore sensation accounted for al-
,oet half of the total Wolverine
yardage.
Ile connected on eight of his
15 passes for 123 yards and, as
if that weren't enough, picked
up 76 yards on 13 ground sor-
ties. Ortmann's running game
,has been improving all season
and, barring mishaps, should
come into its own next year.
But the lad who really tossed in
the surprise of the day was the
right side of Michigan's tremen-
dous defensive duo of Kempthorn
and Dworsky. "Dick the Giant Kil-

ler" had a chance to show what
he could do on offense, and his
performance started the fans
thinking.
"WHY NOT USE Kempthorn at
offensive full?" they were saying.
He lugged the leather three times
and picked up a total of 21 yards,
>ucking and charging all the way.
One of the jaunts gave him his
first touchdown of the year.
Not to be out-done by his part-
ner in crime (and anyone who
thinks that what they do to the
opposition is anything but legal
homicide should guess again),
Danny Dworsky heralded his
final game in Ann Arbor with a
defensive display that should be
remembered for a long time, if
only by those who really appre-
ciated its devastation - Talia-
ferro, Russell et al.
The other scorers in Saturday's
game were Wally Teninga, Ort-
mann, Don Dufek and Norm Jack-
son.

Detroit Club
Names Rolfe
AsManager
DETROIT - (P) - Robert A.
(Red) Rolfe, former New York
Yankee third base star, came back
to the major leagues yesterday as
the new manager of the Detroit
Tigers.
He never before has managed a
professional baseball team.
IN A SURPRISE move, he was
promoted from the Detroit farm
system in an effort to boost the
faltering Tigers back into base-
ball's limelight. He has headed
the farm system for the last year.
Rolfe has been out of the big
time for six years, except for a
tour of duty in 1946 as a Yan-
kee coach.
He succeeds Steve O'neill, who
was fired Nov. 6 after his 1948
Tigers floundered all season in
the second division and ended up
in fifth rlace.
ROLFE, WHOSE salary was not
disclosed, faces a sizable task in
bringing the Tigers back into con-
tention in the American League.
"This club has its weaknesses,"
he admitted to newsmen, "But it
is not a bad ball club. If we can
strengthen two or three spots,
we will be up there in the pen-
nant fight."
He specifically mentioned catch-
ing, second base and pitching.
"OUR OUTFIELD is adequate,"
Rolfe said.
"Naturally, I'm very happy,"
Rolfe grinned. "This is a big op-
portunity. It is somewhat of a
surprise, because I've never had
any experience as a manager.

Lightweight Coach Cliff Keen
wore a broad grin as he announced
in his western drawl that he had
never been so proud of a bunch
of boys in his life.
That 'bunch of boys' had just
come from behind with a second
half rally that netted them three
touchdowns and an upset victory
over previously unbeaten Wiscon-
sin, 20-12.
* * *
THE LITTLE Wolverines had to
win that one to stay in the run-
ning for a piece of the Little Big
Nine title which they shared with
Wisconsin last season.
It was the last game for the
Badgers and a victory would
have meant an outright title for
them. Now, Michigan can tie the
Badgers by whipping Ohio State
this Friday.
If there was any doubt that the
Maize and Blue midgets were de-
serving of another Conference ti-
tle it was erased along with Wis-
consin's six point lead in the
wild second half which sawi four
touchdowns racked up.
FULLBACK BUD Marchall led
the Wolverine scoring in those
Phi Delta Theta will meet
Beta Theta Pi at 4:15 p.m. to-
day at Ferry Field to decide
the intrafraternity touch foot-
ball championship.
two quarters which saw the midg-
ets score more points than they
had scored in the previous ten.
The spindly-legged fullback
crashed over twice to bring his
point total to 24 for the season.
Altogether Michigan has scored

SPORTS
SEYMOUR SONKIN, Night Editor
39 points in their three games
to date.
But it was Pren Ryan, the little
right half with the greased hips
who drew the lion's share of the
crowds plaudits with his sensa-
tional running and vicious tackles
ON THE LINE Capt. Don O'Con-
nell turned in a tremendous per-
formance at guard. Time and
again he slashed through to spill
a Badger play before it could get
under way.
He was the first man down un-
der every punt and he teamed
with center Jim Armelogos and
guard JTere Ogle to open gaping
holes for the Wolverines highly
successful fake pass play.
And so it went through the
whole lineup. It seemed that the
whole team picked the Wisconsin
fray to turn in their top perform-
ances of the season.
Maybe they just wanted to make
the ride to Ohio State interesting.

Poll*..
(Continued from Page 1)
ing against Notre Dame, moved up
a notch into seventh place by a
comfortable margin over Okla-
homa's Sooners who also advanced
a peg from ninth to eighth place.
The Sooners pulled five first place
votes.
The points standings on a 10-9-
8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 basis (first place
votes in parentheses):
1. MICHIGAN (130) .....1,952
2. Notre Dame (27) .....1,721
3. Army (3) ............1,426
4. California (16) .......1,288
5. North Carolina (11) ..1,034
6. Penn State (3)....... 883
7. Northwestern ......... 652
8. Oklahoma (5) .........471
9. Clemson (9) ...........466
10. Southern Methodist .. 440
11., Georgia (2) 292; 12. Mich-
igan State (2) 189; 13. Oregon
187; 14. Tulane 172; 15. Minne-
sota 69; 16. Pennsylvania 60; 17.
Mississippi 50; 18. Ohio State
25; 19. Cornell 20; 20. Georgia
Tech 16.
Others receeiving points in-
cluded Missouri 7.
IT'S A
HAIRCUT!!
Blended and shaped to your
facial features - styled for
you alone. Our idea is:
Workmanship
Personnel - Sanitation
Queries Invited.
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State Theatre

Boxing lasses are eing held
4-6 p.m. Mon., Wed., and Fri.,
downstairs in the boxing room
of the Intramural Building. In-
structions will be given by Leg
Setoiner.

OVER THE TOP-Don Dufek, hard-driving Wolverine fullback, dives over the Indiana line for Mich-
igan's seventh touchdown in last Saturday's 54-0 romp over the Hoosiers. The sophomore back
scored from the one-yard line. Other players visible in the picture are Michigan's center Dick
Farrer (55), end Bob Holloway (82); Indiana end Ernest Kovatch (81), and guard Lloyd Wagnon
(77).

* * *

o __._ .

the season, separates Peterson
from potential all-American end
David Rifenburg, who also netted
his eighth marker of the year Sat-
urday.
THE SURE-HANDED flanker
Chas now scored in all of the Wol-
verir es' eight games, with the ex-
:cept on of Northwestern. He made
up 'or that one in the Navy tilt
when he come through twice.
Though Harry Allis' toe failed
once against the Hoosiers (the
sixth conversion missed because
of a high pass from center
which resulted in its being
blocked), he moved up to the
third slot in the scoring parade
with 12 points Saturday.

STUDY COMES FIRST:
California Ducks Playoff Tilt
For Rose Bowl Bid---Oregon

EUGENE, Ore. - (P) - Oregon
accused California yesterday of
dodging a post-season playoff for
the right to enter the Rose Bowl.
Leo A. Harris, Oregon athletic
director, said California rejected a
private challenge last week, but
added he had not given up hope.
HARRIS SAID he was re-issuing
the challenge publicly because
"everyone interested in intercolle-
giate football and the Rose Bowl
would prefer to have the selection
of the Conference representative
in the 1949 Rose Bowl game de-
pend on the result of a game be-
tween the two schools."

f

"

11

studies," Brutus Hamilton, . Cali-
fornia athletic director, replied.
He added the California play-
ers wanted to accept, "but it's
purely a matter of getting the
proper amount of studying
done."
Notscheduled to meet otherwise,
Oregon and California are tied
for the Pacific Coast Conference
lead, and are expected to end the
season that way.
UNLESS a playoff is arranged,
the West's representative in the
Rose Bowl then would be selected
by a vote of the ten Conference
schools.
In fact votes may determine
both Rose Bowl participants.
The Big Nine will send the op-
posing team, and it will take a
ballot there to settle a complicated
situation.
THE ROSE BOWL agreement
between the conferences provides
that the Big Nine will not send
the same team two years in suc-
cession. This rules out Michigan.
Northwestern therefore is favored
to get the New Year's trip, if it
gets by Illinois Saturday.

DON'T GET BEHIND
THE EIGHT BALL!
if
Shop Early for Christmas.
BALFOUR'S offers you a fine selection
from which to choose.
ALFOUR's... at 1319 South University
"ITS NAME INDICATES ITS QUALITY"

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