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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 14, 1948 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVERMER 14,' X94 '

at.a.t e M iTC. 1 1 TT(LI.CDai isZ . -UN. DA .. N OV... WIBE.. IL. 14. ay Th4x.

w

iverything from Orchids to Lemons
ake Root in Soil at botanical Gardens

SO LET IT SNOW:
Hot Record Society Prepared for Winter

By PETE HOTTON
Orchids, lemon trees, pineapple
plants, "rubber" trees, and cacti
by the dozens-we've got 'em all.
This unique distinction, belongs
to the University's botanical Gar-
dens, where more than 18,000 dif-
ferent plants are grown. A mile
out Packard Road, the Gardens
grow practically every type of
plant from all over the world-
KunitzTo Talk
On Soviet Life
Dr. Joshua Kunitz, authority on
Russianalife and culture, will give
three talks at the University to-
morrow and Tuesday.
The first of these will be an in-
formal lecture in Russian at 4:15
p.m. tomorrow in the West Lee-
ture Rm., Rackham Bldg. At 7:30
p.m. tomorrow Dr. Kunitz will be
the guest of Russky Kruzhok at
the International Center.
He will speak on "Russian Lit-
erature, a Mirror of Russian Life"
at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday in Kellogg
Auditorium, under the auspices
of the .Russian department.
Dr. Kunitz's background in-
cludes numerous trips to the U.S.
S.R. and a series of books on Rus-
sian life and letters. The latest of
these are Russia: The Giant That
Oame Last and a critical anthology
of Russian literature.

everything from rare orchids to
the tomato plant.
AND THEY'RE all classified
into their own category, with the
date and origin of collection and
the name of the collector, accord-
ing to Walter Kleinschmidt, super-
visor of the Gardens.
The University has a staff
of collectors scattered all over
the world who spend their time
hunting for plants-new ones
and old ones.
All plants for botany classes and
labs are grown at the Gardens.
Each class sends in a list eight
or nine months ahead of time and
the botanists have to grow the
plants to exact size, shape, and
other specifications for experi-
ments.
THE GARDENS grow two of the
largest collections of cacti and
rubber plants in the country. In-
cluded in the cacti group are
plants from every conceivable des-
ert in the world. Some cacti even
come from hot, wet jungles. The
irksome dandelion is considered as
a rubber plant, so the gardens
grow that, too.
All plants coming into the
United States must go through
the laboratories at Washington,
D.C., where they are inspected
for any possible tropical or other
kinds of diseases.
"When we receive a plant from
a different climate, we must du-

plicate all its environments,"
Kleinschmidt commented. "Every
room in the greenhouse has a dif-
ferent temperature and humidity
and even the soil for each plant
is different. Walking from room
to room is like taking a quick trip
around the world. Last year we
burned close to 400 tons of coal
to keep our plants warm."
* , *
KLEINSCHMIDT'S own "prod-
igy" is an orchid plant from Brit-;
ish Honduras. In 1936, when he'
received the plant, all he had was
a bushel basket full of dried up
material.
But he salvaged one tiny stem
one inch long and an eighth of
an inch thick and planted it
with faint hopes. After six I
months of careful nursing the
tiny morsel took root and now,
12 years later, it bears 100
healthy blossoms.
"Most of the orchids we grow
here are hybrid and bigger and
more beautiful than wild ones.
These domestic ones are the kind
you might buy for your girl at
anywhere from two to 10 bucks
each," Kleinschmidt said.
Unfortunately the orchids at the
Gardens are not for sale for dat-
ing purposes-only in the interest
of science.

By JIM BROWN
The prospect of long, cold winter
nights holds no fears for members'
of the University Hot Record So-
ciety.
Every Sunday night nearly 40
members of the Society congre-
gate in the Grand Rapids Room'
of the League and lose themselves
in ecstatic contemplation of their
"hot" platters.
THE GROUP was formed in the
fall of 1946 when Palmer Wright,
a graduate student at the Univer-'
sity, advertised in The Daily that
he had jazz records for sale. The
response was tremendous, and be-
fore he realized it he found him-
self president of the Hot Record
Society.
The diversity of tastes in the
group is almost as large as the
membership. One member col-
lects Ellingtonia; another has a
complete collection of "Fats"
Waller.
Still others go in for Coleman
Hawkins, Dizzy Gillespie, Louis
Armstrong and Benny Goodman.
Interest in one, however, does not
preclude interest in the others,
and the members listen attentive-
ly to each other's programs.
U. .3

THE ACTIVITIES of the club
are numerous. Most of the meet-
ings are devoted to record con-
certs, at which members discuss
various phases of the jazz world,
with illustrations from their own
collections.
At tonight's meeting, for ex-
ample, several members will
trace the development of the
jazz vocal styles from the Twen-
ties to the present day.
Once a month the club sponsors'
a jam session, in which local mu-
sicians, and others from as far as
Lansing and Bay City, participate.j
ENCOURAGED by the success

of the Stan Kenton concert which
it sponsored last year, the Hot
Record Society has plans for a
series of concerts by nationally
known jazz artists this year.
Under discussion at present
are concerts by Louis Arm-
strong, and Art Hodes, with Sid-
ney Bechet and Muggsy Span-
ier. Duke Ellington has been
scheduled tentatively for this
spring.
The group has also taken the
lead in attempting to form a na-
tional Hot Record Society.
Tonight's meeting will be held
in the League at 8 p.m. The public
is invited.

I

MATINEE -.30c 'til 5
NIGHTS, Sun. Mat. - 40c
TODAY thru Tuesday
No. Main St. -- Opp. courthouse C61UMB ES
THE
\ \ #:: ::>:? asthe
DURANGO KID in
oretta YOng Henry WcX
APARAMOUNTRRELEASE with

TOO REALISTIC-Unidentified members of an opera company
cast lead Tenor Raoul Jobin (center, bandaged hand), back stage
for first aid after his wrist was slashed accidentally during a per-
formance of "Carmen" in Pittsburgh. He suffered the cut in a
third act struggle scene with Gladys Swarthout. This picture
was made by B. A. Ogden, Jr., an amateur photographer.

SUPERMAN
Chapter 9

-- Added
LATEST PATHE NEWS

Eat at
BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER- SNACKS
OPEN CONTINUOUSLY
Sunday 5:00 P.M. to Saturday 2:30 P.M.
Sunday Breakfast 8:00 A.M. to 1 :00 P.M.
TH E WH ITE SPOT ...517 E.William
When downtown stop at the White Spot - 328 South Main

.,.,,

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mmm ,d

I

rJwrV I;IS37

2- Days -- 2
Sunday and Monday

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the office of the
Assistant to the Presient, Room 1021
Angell Hall, by 3:00 p.m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a.m. Satur-
days.)
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1948
VOL LIX, No. 47
Notices
Choral Union Members whose
attendance records are clear, will
please call for special courtesy
passes admitting to the Cincinnati
Symphony Orchestra concert on
the day of the performance Mon.,
Nov. 15, between the hours of 9:30
and 11:30, and 1 to 4, at the offices
of the University Musical Society,
Burton Memorial Tower.
Bids will be accepted through
Fri., Nov. 19, for the photographic
concession at SLIDE RULE BALL,
which will be held on Fri., Dec. 3.
Bids should be mailed to the Bus-
iness Manager, The Michigan
Technic, 205 W. Engineering An-
nex.
Final Elimination Contest for
School of Music students to ap-
pear as soloists with the Univer-
sity Orchestra will be held at 7:30
p.m., Tues., Nov. 16, Lydia Men-

delssohn Theatre. At that time 31
pianists, 2 singers, 1 string instru-
mentalist and 1 wind instrumen-
talist will be chosen to appear in
the concert scheduled for Decem-
ber 2 in Hill Auditorium,. Con-
testants must be a senior o; grad-
uate student who has been in res-
idence at least one academic year.
Each student will be given, ten
miiutes for try-out; selections
will be based on professional char.
acter and quality of perforrnance,
with School of Music faculty as
judges. The final contest on No-
vember 16 in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre, and the concert .proagam
on December 2 in Hill Auditoium
will be open to the public.
Mr. R. L. Ehinger, of Northrop
Aircraft, Inc., Hawthorne, Cali-
fornia, will be here Nov. 15 and
16 to interview February (BS and
MS) Aeronautical Engineering
graduates. The interview schedule
will be posted on the East Engi-
neering bulletin board, and appli-
cation blanks may be obtained in
Rm. 1079, E. Engineering Bldg.
The Bureau of Appointments
announces the following inter-
views:
The U.S. Naval Ordnance Lab-
oratory will have a representative
here Monday and Tuesday, Nov.
15 and 16, to interview seniors,
graduates, and juniors. They are
interested in seniors and gradu-
ates in the fields of engineering,
mathematics, physics, and metal-
lurgy who expect to graduate be-
fore June 30, 1949. They are seek-
ing juniors in the fields of engi-
neering mathematics, and physi-

cal sciences who expect to com-
plete their junior year before June
30, 1949. This is the only visit
they will mage this year to our
campus, and all interested can-
didates should apply at this time.
The J. C. Penny Co. will have a
representative here Wednesday,
Nov. 17 and also Thursday, Nov.
18, to interview men (February
graduates) for their store manage-
ment and executive training pro-
gram.
Swift and Co. will have a repre-
sentative here Tues., Nov. 16, to
interview men and women for po-
sitions as standard checkers, sales-
men, market research analysts,
chemists and stenographers (Feb-
ruary graduates).
Additional information in re-
gard to the above announcements,
and appointments, may be ob-
tained at 201 Mason Hall or by
,calling Ext. 371.
One of the California Educa-
iional Institutions has given us
One of the California educa-
tional institutions has given us
calls for teachers in the following
fields: Art (crafts, history and
methods); Biological Science;
Business Administration; Ele-
mentary Education (including
methods and audio-visual aids);
French; German; Spanish; Geog-
Saphy in combination with an-
thropology, history or geology;
'Home Economics; Journalism;
Mathematics, Music (violin, strings
and theory); Psychology; Speech
arts; and Industrial Arts. The
Ph.D. degree is desired, but those
with Master's degrees and good
experience will be considered. For
(Continued on Page 4)

i

Plan to
Hold Your
DANCES &
DINNERS
at the
AMERICAN LEGION
1035 S. Main Home
Phone 6141
For Information

HOME OF
418 East Washington
-it - serving
FAM I LY-STYLE
DINNERS
and featuring
SMORGASBORD
For real eating pleasure, try our tempting meals and eat
all you want from our colorful and delicious dishes on our
smorgasbord. Phone 9717 for reservations.
Daily, except Friday, 11:30 to 1:306and 5:00 to 8:00 P.M.
Sunday, 12 Noon to 6:30 P.M.

Continuous
from 1 :30 P.M.

day !

All Seats

_,
r >
t
f ,
a ".
: : :: L ::: :..: '
A GpLUMBtiA PICTURE

50c

ORPHEUM".
South Main near liberty

"The best thing to come out
-of France since the Statue of
Liberty."

Jackie Cooper
I Jackie Coogan

- Plus! - -
in The Screen's Scream Team!
in "FRENCH LEAVE"

Coming "FORT APACHE" with Henry Fonda
TUESDAY! and "STORK IPITES MAN"
PRICES: Weekday Matinees 25c - Evening and Sunday 35c

--Walter Winchell
An intimate theater showing
finest films of all nations.
"EARL O
THE CROWN"
with
SaschaGuitry

ill

-2--1

Starts
Today!
111

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

4HER~i
- i
- NAM
" ;: KITT
- R~
:Ewj WITI
-NOL
t.+
AND
7:LOTS
*1
' -
UUK'/
-come$
- e e h i

'.
UCK
- f
M Of
S

MOU
E! .
OR F R
BON\D-BARTON
DRAPEIS

FOR SALE
FOR CHRISTMAS
Anything She Desires at the
ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP
)i
COUSINS ON STATE STREET
Pure Cashmere Sweaters by
BRAEMAR
Imported From Scotland
)2
RADIO AND TELEVISION REPAIRS---
Quick, competent service by experts.
Aero Radio, 335 S. Main. Ph. 4997. )4
1948 KAISER. Heater, seat covers, un-
dercoat, Prestone. $1850. Call Ypsi-
lanti 3591J1 after 5:00 p. m. )37
MIDNIGHT blue tuxedo, single breast-
ed, size 38. Call Ypsilanti 9380. )38
DIAMOND Engagement Ring - Blue
white, brilliant, well over a carat.
platinum setting, side diamonds.
Yours for ?'% retail. Phone 29552. )39
LOVELY Mouton 3/4 length coat;
brown cloth coat with fox tuxedo
fur; brown gabardine full-length
coat; brown gabardine suit; 4 pretty
wool dresses, all sized 14-16; 3 pr. I.
Miller shoes, size 8%A. All are in
excellent condition. Call 2-0219. )40
MOTORCYCLE--1940 Indian 30-50. Good
condition, $275. 2-3762 after 7 p.m. )31}
FORD-Model "A" Four-Door. Brakes,
engine good condition.' Pour kgood
tires. $175.00. Phone AA 25-8073. )34
TUXEDO-Size 40, also tuxedo and tails
both size 38, practically new. 401 Pot-
ter, phone 2-6567. )36
FOR SALE-Black velvet evening cape!
with hood, excellent condition, call'
2-6756. )321
MODEL A Pickup for sale cheap or what
do you have to trade. A. D. Mayfield,
1216 W. Washington, call 8515. )35
ANSLEY Radio-Phonograph table mod-
el, with Webster changer, blond mod-
ern cabinet. One year old. $150.00.
Phone 2-3848. )33
STOCK UP against low temperatures
with cozy soft gowns and pajamas
from the ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP.
)I

9 FOR SALE
SHOES - Size 12B Florsheim -Scotch
grain, worn once. Bargain. 24401-220
Wenley. )41
JUST ARRIVED
Nylon Short Sleeve Sweaters
White - Pink - Blue - Maize
$3.95
RANDALL'S
306 South State Street )3
PARAKEETS make delightful, Inexpen-
sive pets capable of learning to talk
and whistle. $6 each. Bird supplies
and cages. 562 S. 7th. Ph. 5330. )18
COUSINS ON STATE STREET
is showing a complete line of
PRINCE MATCHABELLI
PERFUMES and COLOGNES )2
MISCELLANEOUS
DANCE MUSICr
Chuck Downer and his Orchestra
Phone 25-7911 )IM
HELP WANTED
ASS'T. for Bibliographic and Patent
searches. Must have some training in
Cheni. & Eng. Part time if desired.
W. L. Badger, 309 S. State. )6H
PART-Time Help Wanted for soda foun-
tain. Apply after 6:00 P.M. Broadway
Soda Bar, 1015 Broadway. )4H
WANTED TO RENT -
ARRANGE rooms for your Thanksgiv-
ing week-end guests. Pierce Transient
Home. 1133 E. Ann. Phone 8144. )8R
WEEKEND GUESTS? Rooms available
in private homes. Call student Rm.
Bureau, 28827 6:30-8:30 p. m. )2R
WANTED-Room for female University
employee. Help with children or con-
panion to woman after working hours.;
Box 157, Daily. )3N
VETERAN needs apt. to marry. Call Ju-
lius Steinberg, 328 Mich., 2-4401 after
6 or leave message. )2N
SUITE or apartment for 2 or 3 quiet
professional school student for spring
semester. Call evenings, 4211. Rossen
or Siegal. )4N

WANTED
WANTED-2-4 Tickets to Ohio State
Game. Call 2-7977. )7W
ROOMS FOR RENT
WELL-Furnished rooms for male stu-
dents. Two double rooms, one suite
for three. 1218 Olivia. Call after 5
p.m1. ) 4R
FOR RENT
VACANCY for 2 male students in a suite
of rooms. 811 E. Ann, Phone 2-2052.
) 3R
TRANSPORTATION
COUPLE seeks transportation in gen-
eral direction of Cincinnati. Nov. 24th.
Will share expenses. Call2-2769. )2T
LOST AND FOUND
L.OST-Gray kitte'n with white face
and feet disappeared from 1361 Wil-
mat about 3 weeks ago. Ph. 2-4872.
24L
LOST-A red leather billfold, vicinity
of library. Return of important pap-
ers urgent. Reward. Call Marian
2-9110. )25L
LOST-A red leather wallet with coin
attachment containing $26. Will find-
er please contact Barbara Davis, 1107
Mich. Ave., Ph. 2-7657. )23L
TRAGEDY!! Lost sorority pin! Alpha
Chi Omega. Base engraved: D. Cady.
Call Donna, 2-3839. Reward! )8L
IOST in State Street campus area-
green leather billfold containing only
money. Call 7312 during the day. Re-
ward. )22L
BUSINESS SERVICES
"NEARLY NEW" QUALITY CLOTHING
Coats, $9 - $25 Suits, $7 - $25
Dresses, $2 - $10 Skirts, $1 - $8
Also other miscellaneous apparel
Hildegarde Shoppe 109 E. Washington
)1B
RUSH I NG
is truly impressive with a movie of your
house and activities. Great results.

Superlative Miniature Features

I1

i

_

Disney's Immortal
"THREE LITTLE PIGS"

*

Academy Winner
"CLIMBING THE MATTERHORN"

I

r

r HE WORLD IS
FULL OF CARMENS.
They may not
know it cxcept
in their most
secret day dreams.
COLUMBIA PICTURES presents
HAYWORTHFORD
: ....

9

Produ~cd by
Directed by it, C. POTER
Released I 1 rUnted Alt

...

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s ° " " f "
t J ! . I R_ A

m

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