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November 13, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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A'TURDAY. ATONE MER, 13. 1949

" mmmal MaTva atT ~!LAN T 1 V m awI'T~lV NA1f1'.1~1O~Va4.aaaJ w t

LOIA'&JLV

I

OTS ENDED:
Ambassador Says India
Starting Progressive Era
By PHYLLIS KULICK spection trip' of American indus-
With communal riots finally trial centers, stopped in at In-j
of the way, India can concen- ternational Center en route from
te on economic and industrial Detroit to meet his student coun-
gress," Sir Benegal Rama Rau, trymen.
vly appointed Indian ambassa-

I _

Grad School
Will Present
Initial Mixer

LIFE'S LITTLE PROBLEM:
Assistant to Conductor Plans,
Marching Magic of 'U' Band

Students,
Will Meet

Professors
Socially

ior to the United States, told The
Paily yesterday.
Sir Benegal, who is on an in-
Campus Set
or Largest
Ballot Tussle
(Continued from Page 1)
Candidates f o r vice - presi-
Lent: Audrey Buttery, Marilyn
Brownie" Howell, John Kamp-
neier, Arlynn Rosen, and Mary
-arolyn Wright.
Candidates for secretary: Betty
Kole, Nancy Culligan, Margaret
Jllingwood, Jo Kitchen, Ginny
,lchlas and Ruth M. Parsons.
Candidates for treasurer: Ann
V. Griffin, William J. Marcoux
nd Eugenia McCallum.
Candidates running for Board
a Control of Student Publications
re: Terrence H. Benbow, '51; Bill
taldwell John B. Campbell '49E;
Uchard Kraus, Grad; Bruce Lock-
tood, 48E; Alfred Millstein, BAd;
bichard W. Morrison, '50; and
Nomas C. Walsh, '51L.
Those running for J-Hop Com-
mittee are: Joyce Atchison, '50;
ohn Baum '50; Mac Barnum, '50;
teve Bernard; Jean Blake; Jim
urke, '50; Virginia Correll, '50;
uth Campbell, '5SM; Nancy
:upples; Donna De Harde, '50;
William E. Duerr, '50E; James
|y; Richard A. Entenmann, '50;
oan Fast, '50ED; Gilda Fried,
9; Ken Gould; Donald Green-
ield-
The list continues with George
. Hawthorne, '50; Mary Ann Har-
s, '50; Jack Hayward, '50; Don
[iles, 'SOBAd; Ralph E. Hillmon,
i0E; Joanne Hendel, '50; Dick
[itt, '50; Ester Kaufman, '50;
oan Leszczynski, Jo Lyons, '5ED.
[arold L. Mindell, '50E; John R.
[ontrose, '50BAd; David Murray,
iOBAd; Jeri Mulson, 'O5Ed.
The list concludes with: Lloyd
Nick" Oliver;- Janice Olivier, '50;
)elores Olsen, '50; Bill Owen, '50;
[argaret Price, '50; Morgan Ram-
ey, Jr., '50BAd; Reginald G.
auls, IV, '50ED; Kenneth Scobie;
etty Jane Schmidt, '5OED; Burt
is m, '5134d; Jim Smith;
[arilyn Stone. '50ED; Georganna
Filson, '50ED; Nancy Williams,
ODH.'
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THE AMBASSADOR would not
speculate on the outcome of the
Constitutent Assembly which in
addition to drawing up a consti-
tution is deciding whether India
will remain part of the British
Commonwealth.
The country is surrendering
its dominion status, which it
won two years ago, to become
a republic. Although India would
like to remain within the Com-
monwealth, it is a legalistic
matter whether she can do so
with a Republic status, Sir Ben-
egal declared.
"The split with the Moslems
has ironed out the internal dis-
ruption and certainly will benefit
India," he said.
HE INDICATED that Pakistan
will probably not be as lucky.
"When a group becomes as na-
tionalistic as the Moslems in their
desire for independence, it doesn't
stop to consider what will happen
to its economy."
India has all the great in-
dustrial cities and modern de-
velopments on the Peninsula
and is a big enough unit without
Pakistan, he said.
"Pakistan may want to become
part of India again in a genera-
tion or two, but we don't regret
the split as India is finally secur-
ing internal unity," Sir Benegal
declared.
MOSLEMS AND Hindus are mi-
grating by the millions into their
respective territories thus hasten-
ing the homogeneity, he pointed
out.
"The Moslems remaining in
India are receiving full equality
according to the new constitu-
tion," Sir Benegal said. There
will be no difference between
caste, creed or color.
The ambassador was quizzed by
the Indian students on camps as
to the possible effect on them of
the economizing taking place in
their native home. He assured
them there will be no cutting down
of student allowances.
'Concert Trials
Will BeHeld
Auditions for Music School stu-
dents interested in appearing with
the University Symphony Orches-
tra in their forthcoming concert,
will be held at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
A music school faculty jury will
hear six pianists, from which three
will be selected to participate in
the concert. Two singers will be
selected from four contestants,
and also one wind instrumentalist
from two tryouts.
EACH CONTESTANT, who will
be given not more than ten min-
utes, must be a senior or a grad-
uate student who has been in res-
idence at least one academic yar,
Dean Earl V .Moore of the music
school announced.
Both the final elimination con-
est and the concert, to be held
Dec. 2, will be open to the public.
WANTED
Student to act as reprc-
sentative to sell slacks to fel-
low students at the wholesale
level. Easy selling. Liberal
commissions paid. Write to
The Eton Co. of N.Y., 307 5th
Avenue, New York, N.Y.

SCUFFLE AT HOSPITAL ENTRANCE-Two Detroit policemen step in to stop a scuffle between
Harvey Morse (center), Hospital Employes Union (AFL) organizer, and Dr. Earl A. McCowen,
resident surgeon, at the entrance to Harper Hospital where service employes are on strike. No
arrests were made following the clash.

Graduate students will have a
chance to meet each other and
their professors socially at the
Graduate School Council's mixer
from 2 to 5 p.m. tomorrow in the
Rackham Building.
It will be the first social event
of the semester for the graduate
school students, and the first or-
ganized student social event at the
graduate school for two years.
THE PURPOSE of the meeting,
Mrs. L. M. Beltram, graduate
school house director, said is to
let graduate students get acquaint-
ed with each other.
Aside from obvious social ad-
vantages, the meeting is expect-
ed to help graduate students
get to know each other before
they are asked to choose their
representatives to the newly re-
organized Graduate School
Council.
In addition they will have an
opportunity to meet several of
their professors and Deans R. A.
Sawyer and Peter Okkelberg of the
graduate school.
TO COVER THE, cost' of the
mixer, which will feature dancing,
bridge and refreshments, Mrs. Bel-
tram has announced that there
will be an admission charge of
25 cents per person.
All graduate students are urged
to attend this initial program. If
it is successful, similar mixers will
be held in the future.
Gold for Copper
DUSTY JUNCTION, Idaho -
The price of police protection in
the United States rose from $91
million in 1913 to $382 million in
1j932.
Since 1941 it again rose to $411.

By JANE DIETERLE
Jack Lee, assistant conductor of
the Marching Band, has marched
himself into a big job.
This year-his first at the Uni-
versity:--he is in charge of
planning the colorful and intricate
formations which the band per-
forms on Saturday afternoons
during the football games.
* *. *
LEE'S FIRST JOB is to conjure
up a theme for the band's half-
time appearance. Holidays and
other special events often provide
inspiration, and many of the ideas
employed are suggested by indi-
vidual members of the band and
Prof. W. D. Revelli, its conductor.
Next, the music-anything
from Beethoven to "Four Leaf
Clover" - is picked and pat-
terns for the formations are
worked out. Lee uses a series
of charts which locate each band
member in every part of the
formation.
All of the preliminary planning
occurs before the band actually
begins to practice. A week of drill-
ing is devoted to each program.
THE BAND MEMBERS spend
the first few days learning the
music they are to play and then
the steps of the formations. Us-
ually Revelli directs the music and
Lee supervises the drilling.
By Wednesday the band has
mastered the essentials of the
program, and the remainder of
the week is spent in perfecting
the performance, both music
and formations.
To make the whole program a
success, each man must know his
own part backwards and forwards.
* * *
WHAT HAPPENS if a band
member finds on Saturday that he
will be unable to appear in the

performance? It often happens,
according to Lee.
To prepare for such an emer-
gency, the band trains five re-
serves, who, each week, famil-
iarize themselves with the eitire
show. Then, when a man is ab-
sent, one of the reserves steps
into his place.
"Usually," Lee said, "the poor
sub has no chance to go through
the formations before the actual
performance. During the program
the entire band prays that he
won't get lost."
Despite temporary complica-
tions, on Saturday afternoon the
week-long preparation is rewarded
in a program which exhibits the
perfect timing and faultless per-
formance of the Michigan March-
ing Band!
French Movie 'Volpone'
To Be Shown Tonight
The curtain will rise for the last
time tonight on the French com-
edy "Volpone."
The film, which stars Harry
Baur and Louis Jouvet, will be
shown at 8:30 p.m. at the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.

Atom Group
Offers Student
Fellowships
Advanced students with scien-
tific leanings but, as yet, indefi-
nite plans are being given an in-
centive to enter the field of atomic
energy through Atomic Energy
Commission fellowships.
Pre-doctoral research fellow-
ships in the physical and biological
sciences are offered to enable stu-
dents of unusual ability to gain
further graduate training and to
do research for the doctorate in
one of these fields.
* * '
ANY WORK which in a broad
sense is basic to atomic research
and development of atomic en-
ergy is allowed the applicant who
is accepted by the appropriation
AEC Board.
Students accepted to fellowships
may do their research at an ac-
credited college or university that
grants the doctorate degree, at one
of the AEC's national laboratories,
or at any other institution ap-
proved by the AEC. Initial ap-
pointments are for a year, and the
basic grants range from $1,500 to
$2,400.
RESULTS 01FTHlE student's re-
search is mad available to the
public in full, except when doing
so would endanger national se-
curity.
Instructions for requesting ap-
plication forms for these fellow-
ships are available in the Grad-
uate school offices, 1006 Rackham
Building.
LaMore Will Talk
On Modern Art
Professor Cliet LaMore of the
architecture school will give a gal-
lery talk on the University mu-
seum's current exhibtlion of con-
teinporary modern paintings from
the Albright Art Gallery at :3:30
p.m. Sunday in West Gallery,
Alumni Mciorial Hall.
A former faculty mnembher of the
Albright School of Art. Buffalo,
Prof. LaMore is a noted authority
on modern art and particularly
these paintings.

High School Citizenship Level
Determined by Student Groups

7 -I ((

Citizenship at the high school
level is directly proportional to the
standards of the student's own or-
ganization, according to Lawrence
E. Vredevoe, director of the Bu-
reau of School Services who spoke
at the Michigan High School Con-
ference on Citizenship, yesterday.
Problems of the average high
school student council were the
topics discussed at the -conference.
POWER, AUTHORITY, respon-
sibility, democracy, prestige and a
strong constitution-along with
good faculty and administrative
relations-were called "the quali-
ties the make a good student
council," by Vredevoe.

Power is delegated by the prin-
cipal, he pointed out. "Those who
do a good job in their delegated
field will get more authority."
The importance of representa-
tion of the whole group as a basis
to get student cooperation was
stressed by Vredevoe. "The most
effective student organization in
any school is one which places the
other fellow first."
STUDENTS SPLIT upinto about
fifteen discussion groups according
to their interests following the ad-
dress.
President Alexander G. Ruthven
welcomed the delegates.

I .y

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FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

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CHINO-SUNTANS
$395
Sizes 29 to 42

512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Roger Williams Guild House
502 East Huron
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study Class. Study of the
teachings of Jesus.
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship. Sermon, "Men
at Work." Speakers will be: Dr. Frank Eg-
gleton, Assoc. Prof- of Zoology; Dr. Charles
Brassfield, Assoc. Prof. of Physiology; and
Mr. Robert Johnson, Certified Public Ac-
countant.
6:00-8:00"-GuildProgram. Prof. Albert Hyma
will speak on "Our Protestant Heritage."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Waslhtenaw Ave.
Alfred Scheips, Pastor
(The Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod)
Saturday, 4:30 P.M.--Open House after the
game.
Sunday-
9:45 and 11:00 A.M.-Identical Services, with
the pastor preaching on the subject, "The
Grace of Christian Giving."
5:30 P.M.-Supper and program of Gamma
Delta, Lutheran student club.

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Jackets Galore at the P-X Store

1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.-Adult Discussion Group. Mrs.
Rachel Rose Andresen speaking on: "The
Ana Arbor Council of Churches."
11:00 A.M.-Service of Worship: Rev. Edward
H. Redman, preaching on: "The Ministry
as a Profession."
6:30 P.M.-Unitarian Students meet at Lane
Hall. Mrs. Rachel Rose Andresen on: "Am-
sterdam Conference of the World Council
of Churches."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Ministers: James Brett Kenna and
Erland J. Wang
Music : Lester McCoy. director
Mary McCall Stubbins. organist
Student Activities: Doris Reed, associate
director.
10:45 A.M.---Worship Service. Dr. Kenna's
Sermon Topic: "How Christian Is Commu-
nism?"
5:30 P.M.-Wesleyan Guild will hear a stu-
dent panel discuss "Social Growth."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Michigan League Ballroom
Reading Room, 211 East Washington
10:30 A.M.-Sunday Lesson Sermon.
"Mortals and Immortals."
11:45 A.M.-Sunday School.
8:00 P.M.-Wednesday evening Testimonial
Meeting.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hill and Tappan
F. E. Zendt, Minister to the Congregation.
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
9:40 A.M.-Student bible class at the church.
10:50 A.M.-Morning Worship. Nursery for
children during the service.
GUILD.HOUSE, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Minister to Students
Jean Garee, Assistant in Student Work
6:00 P.M. - Supper at the Congregational
Church for members of the Congrega-
tional-Disciples Guild. Topic for discus-
sion, "Alternative to Futility."
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
For National Lutheran CouncilStudents
1304 Hill Street
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
9:10-10:00 A.M-Bible Hour at the Center.
10:30 A.M.-Worship Services in Zion and
Trinity Churches. Holy Communion in
Zion Church.
5:30 P.M.-L.S.A. Meeting in Zion Parish
Hall. Movie-"Salt of the Earth."
Tuesday, 7:30-8:30 P.M. - Special Interest
Group at the Center.
Tuesday and Friday, 7:35-7:55 A.M.-Morning
Devotions.
VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
Interdenominational
University Community Center
Willow Run Village
Rev. J. Edgar Edwards-Chaplain
10:45 A.M.-Divine Worship-Men and Mis-
sions Sunday. Sermon topic, "Committed
Unto Us."
10:45 A.M.-Church School and Nursery.
5:30 P.M.-Cooperative Church Fellowship
Dinner. Films: "Beyond Our Own" and
"Christmas Rhapsody."
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL and
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Theodore R. Schmale, D.D.,
Walter S. Press, Ministers
Irene Applin Boise, Director of Music
9:30 A.M.-Church School.
10:45 A.M.-,Morning Worship. Sermon by
Rev. Press: "A Life with a Purpose."
5:30-7:30 P.M.-Student Guild. Supper. Two
student speakers, Wym Price and Will Ky-
selka, will tell about their travels in Europe.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
YMCA Bldg., FourthAve.
Carl York Smith, Minister
10:30 A.M.-Radio Program. Church Divided.
11:00 A.M.-The Temptation of Jesus.
7:30 P.M.-Isaac, Child of Promise.

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