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November 13, 1948 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


MMIR ER 13, 1940

TH VMICHIGAN DAILY

'AGE CEP

mm

EMBER 13, 194R WAGE THREPi

eahy Fears Over-Eager

eeling in Irish
NEW YORK-(P)-A high per- that hi
entage of national football inter- up a hi
st will center tomorrow on South He feel
end, Ind., where Notre Dame,
eeting its stiffest test of the sea: The a
on, will be out to prove both on national
he field and on the scoreboard at stake
hat it has a better team than delphia
ichigan. ed spe
Northwestern's young eleven is clIi
ast as the gridiron guinea pig' clp
nd is certain to prove a reluctant wallop
ubject. The Wildcats lost their
nly game to Michigan a month
go, 28-0. The undefeated Irish .
eel duty bound to inflict a worse
beating than that on the boys
rom. Evanston.
I~ S1
AT THE MOMENT, Michigan
tands No. 1 in the Associated PRES
ress weekly poll of the country's
utumnal experts, with Notre
ame No. 2 and breathing down than th
the Wolverines' necks. Army is No. ing adn
3 and California fourth. last we
Dispatches from Indiana re-
port that Coach Frank Leahy of OF T4
the Irish is mildly perturbed the clas
Souther:

Gridders

Lightweights Upset Unbeaten Badgers

i

is lads feel they must run
igh score on the Wildcats.
Is they will be over-eager.
only other game in which2
p restige will be severely
e is the meeting at Phila-
between Army's undefeat-
edsters and once-beaten
n order to live up to their
s the Cadets will have tc
the Quakers 'good-better

1
f
1
C
J
C

-...
...

i rAmthe
GRANTSTAND
By MURRAY GRANT... Daily Sports Editor

PORTS
HOLMES, Night Editor

- - - - - __- Ed - - - --owwww"Nam

a

he two-touchdown thump-
ministered by Penn State
ek.
OP SECTIONAL interest is
sh at Little Rock between
rn Methodistnnce-beaten

HOLIDAY
An Adventure in
Good Smoking
MOitiC it
+ $ 4 a r 1 {

leader of the Southwest confer-
ence, and the Arkansas Razor-
backs. Texas faces a possible tar-
tar in Texas Christian at Fort
Worth.
Highlighting the day's pro-
gram in the South is North
Carolina's attempted comeback
against Maryland at Griffith
Stadium in Washington, D.C.
The Tar Heels' claim to national
honors received a jolt in last
week's 7-7 deadlock with Wil-
liam and Mary.
Ohio State at Illinois and Mine-
nesota at Iowa top the Big Nine
slate as Northwestern plays out-
side the conference. Oklahoma,
fresh from its rip-roarin6 con-
quest of Missouri, tackles a lack-
luster Nebraska eleven at Nor-
man.

WITH A LUSTY NINE out of ten correct guesses in last week's
prognostications our season's average took a tremendous leap
way back over the .700 mark.
Only the Georgia Tech-Tennessee scramble marred our perfect
record as our favorites came through in great style. With 48 wins
and 18 losses, our average now stands at .727.
* ** *
MICHIGAN-INDIANA-The Wolverines get another crack at
bettering Notre Dame's score and moving into a commanding lead
over the Irish in the AP poll. Notre Dame won by 36 points, maybe
Michigan will win by 37.
MINNESOTA-IOWA-The Gophers may not be leading the
Big Nine, but they've got the top offensive and defensive club
according to the statistics. Iowa hasn't got anything except a
fighting spirit. Minnesota will move on to another victory, but
they aren't going anywhere.
PURDUE-PITT-Pitt has been running hot and cold this season,
but Purdue has just been running frigid. Pitt took a bad beating at
the hands of Ohio State and they shouldn't fare too well against
the victory-starved Boilermakers. Purdue to romp.
NORTHWESTERN-NOTRE DAME-Northwestern has plenty at
stake in this battle of two titans. Like most of the other top Big Nine
schools, the Wildcats are dropping the Irish from their schedule
after this game. This is the year for Northwestern. They have a
Rose Bowl bid almost clinched and a victory over Notre Dame would
heal a lot of wounds. But the Irish still play football for keeps and
much as we'd love to see that upset, we'll begrudgingly stick with the
favorite, Notre Dame. .
ILLINOIS-OHIO STATE-On a basis of their showing against
Michigan the Illini have been installed as favorites in this one.
But the Bucks have a well-rounded attack and this is going to be
our upset of the week. Ohio State in a real thriller to set the
stage for a mighty battle between the Buckeyes and Michigan
a week hence.
WISCONSIN-MARQUETTE-The Badgers have to win sometime.
And this looks like the tweek. Marquette has hopes, but not much
else. Wisconsin should win this one, but then again they should have
won a few others.
* * *C
NAVY-COLUMBIA-Here is a contest between a couple of teams that
have run into tough schedules and more than their share of bad
luck. The Lions are a good ball club for three quarters and the
Middies fight all the time. Columbia has won a couple this season,
but Navy is still looking. So, putting our jinx on the Navy Blue and
Gold, we'll pick the Middies.
ARMY-PENN-The Army has got it again, they've come up
with another juggernaut. Penn is good, but they had a rude
awakening last week. Maybe they'll be up for this game, but
Army is the stronger team. The Cadets to win, but not easily.
CORNELL-DARTMOUTH-The Big Red and the Big Green
tangle in another top Eastern brawl. Cornell has lost only to Army,
while Dartmouth seems to gather strength each week. It's a toss-up
but since we're using an Indian penny we'll pick the Indians of Dart-
mouth to triumph in a very close game.

Three Touchdown Rally
Beats Wisconsin, 20-12
Victory Keeps Team in Running for Title;
Ryan, Marshall Star in-Second Straight Win
By SY SONKIN
After spotting Wisconsin a 6-0 halftime lead, Michigan's 150-
pound gridders roared back for three touchdowns to gain a 20-12 vic-
tory yesterday, and stay in the running for the little Big Nine title.
This game ended the Badger schedule giving them a record of
three wins and one loss. Michigan, with two wins in three starts,
can tie Wisconsin for the crown by beating Ohio State next week.
TWO OF THE WOLVERINE scores were made by fullback Bud
Marshall; and Prentice Ryan, a standout onoffense and defense, all
afternoon, went over for the other.
The line, led by Captain Don O'Connell, was magnificent,
opening holes for the' Michigan backs while holding the Wis-
consin running attack to 88 yards.

I
J
i
l

I

SCORES TWICE-Lightweight
fullback Bud Marshall crashed
over for two touchdowns yes-
terday to lead the little Wolver-
ines to an upset victory over
Wisconsin.

Nation's Best
Claimed by SJ
According to the San Jose State
college newspaper, this-is the way
they figure that they are tops in
the nation.
"STANFORD BEAT San Jose
State by six points. San Jose is
six points behind them. Stanford
defeated UCLA by 20 points. San
Jose is 14 points better than
UCLA. Northwestern beat UCLA
by 19 points. San Jose is five points
behind Northwestern. Northwest-
ern beat Purdue by 21 points. San
Jose is 16 points better than Pur-
due. Notre Dame beat Purdue by
one point.
"San Jose State is. 15 points
better than Notre Dame. Notre
Dame beat Michigan State by 19
points. San Jose is 34 points
better than MSC, who lost to
Michigan by six points.
"Therefore, San Jose is 28 points
better than the nation's leading
team, Michigan."

Two thins ev&--
gs 8 or
J"- merian S4}"er G;rirExp:r;
at pass defense. ' (rrific) formation-.
Theformation of a "Manhauan" shirt
is terrific, too-.
L.This is a ch"rlader.n ur.Alo
eats efese. Trrific onu cor
iusan terrific, troo.Fbr
CTps is4 a, Te Janhattan" Brt. lo,
leads!.cheers . Poula:butondtilcola
7┬░pr. 1is, Th"Manhattan"Shrt. Als.

.0'

I

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Distance Men
Run Throuoh
TimeTrials
Rounding out a month and a
half of pre-season practice, Mich-
igan's hard working distance men
went through their final time trial
under the watchful eyes of year-
ling coach Don Canham and his'
assistant Elmer Swanson.
The one and a quarter mile dis-
tance was swiftly covered by both
varsity and freshmen alike, there
being sufficient participation to
warrant two separate sections in
the event.
The varsity was led by Bruce
Vreeland, Shel Capp, and Ted
Birdsall, with Doug Parks, War-
ren Dwyer, Fred Stoliker, and
Arnold Gowans following close
on their heels.P
Fiery haired Vreeland's time was
a good 6:40. Half-mile stalwart1
Bob Thomason started well but
was forced to pull up midway
through the race because of a
turned ankle.I
Don McEwen and Aaron Gor-t
don paced the freshmen thin-
clads to a good showing, with
Ron Packer, Bill Hickman, and
Larry Lange furnishing the clos-
est competition. The freshmen
have been out in force since the
beginning of the semester, and
have shown fine form in their
work to date.l
This time trial is to be followed 1
by a team race today and two
other events next week, after
which the entire squad will retire
to Yost Field House, where they
will train until the latter part of
January when the indoor season
opens.
'J' Fresh men
FiuishDrills
Michigan's freshmen football
team wound up its fall practice ses-
sions yesterday with the 35 nu-
meral winners running through a
light drill and posing for the squad
picture.
These 35 youthful gridders are
the cream of the crop of nearly
140 frosh that answered Coach
Wally Weber's call for practice
eight weeks ago.
In this relatively short period
the colorful frosh mentor and his
assistants have cone a tremendous
job in developing the green inex-
perienced group that greeted them
the first day.
The best indication of the
strength of the team is the terrific
showing the frosh made in scrim-
mage against Don Robinson's jay-
vees. Several times the "B" team
was lucky to play on even terms
with the first year footballers and
on one or two occasions were com-
pletely outclassed.

The Wolverines had two scoring
scored, but they fumbled away the -
first and lost the second through
a penalty.
* * .
AFTER THE Maize and Blue
had moved the ball to Wisconsin's
20, Ryan fumbled and Bill Mc-
Cormick recovered for the Badgers.
Michigan got another break in
the second quarter when Bruce
Borden, standing back to punt,
fumbled the pass from center
and was hit on his own 39-yard
line.
On the first play Ryan sped
around left end to the 15. Then

Xate4 t
(4114

The University of Michigan
Skating Rink, Hill and Fifth,
will be open to the public to-
night from 8-10 and Sunday
from 3-5 p.m. Admission will be
25 cents for students with ID
cards, 35 cents for faculty em-
ployees, and 50 cents for the
general public.

Marshall ran to the five, but the
gain was nullified by an offside
penalty and the Wolverines were
stalled once more.
* *
IT WAS HERE that the Badgers
took over and moved for their first
touchdown, and it was a Michigan
penalty that got them started.
McCormick made two yards to
the 15, and then the Wolverines
were penalized for unnecessary
roughness. This 15-yard gift
took the Badgers out of the
danger zone.
In 12 plays, the invaders
marched to the Michigan 20, but
the Wolverines held them to five
yards in three downs. Then left
half Tom Stouthamer faded back
and threw a pass to Dwaine Dick-
inson on the goal line. Dick Ko-
cinski's kick was wide.
*' * * ,
WITH THE opening of the sec-
ond half, the Wolverines were a
new team. The first three times
they got their hands on the ball
they went all the way.
After Moorish ran the kickoff
to the Michigan 32, the Maize
and Blue scored in 10 plays with
Marshall plunging over from the
one-foot line.
Michigan scored the extra point
when Wilcox, back to kick, took a
high pass from center and ran
over.

I

( jz

are doomed
to extinction
without

RYAN WENT OVER the next
time from nine yards out climax-
ing a 66-yard drive in which he
accounted for over half of the
yardage. Wilcox' kick was good
and Michigan led, 14-6.
The last Wolverine score came
in the fourth period when Mar-
shall went over from the two.
Wilcox kicked wide on this try.
Wisconsin came back to score
after Coach Cliff Keen sent in his
reserves. Halfback Ralph Haffey
cut inside his right end and sprint-
ed 51 yards to score. Kocinski's
attempt was again wide, and the
Wolverines maintained possession
of the ball until the game ended.

,r
-soft

I

demand for
individual
engraving

of cuff links and tie bars by courtesy of
BAY'S ARCADE JEWELRY SHOP

opportunities before the BadgersI

( I,,

how to get up?

It

HALLER'S
JEWELERS

prescribe: Miniature Alarm Clocks
in various colors at $4.95.
is across the street from MORRILL'S
whose Christmas Cards are charming.
SLATERS says
don't forget that a BOOK is the most
PERSONAL Christmas Gift of all time.

SAFFELL & BUSH's bow ties
in colors - of course.

i

h

SE 1L

N(OVXI

1

and
co\ov

d 1z

HEARTY MEALS
TO 'PLEAsL
-THE HA1

't.aso.~

"'I

... I found an excellent
selection of Van Heusen
shirts at Staeb and Day.

ftp~l Al

to turn into FRANKLIN'S LUGGAGE SHOP
and get away from it all.

is
the
time

vilm

'W TOP

T

- U- ~ij

W 1

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