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November 09, 1948 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-09

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9; 1948

TH E MICHIGAN-DAILY

PAGE TIE

Subs Show Promise in Navy Game

i

By B. S. BROWN
There's one thing for sure that
can be deduced from Michigan's
35-0 romp over Navy last Satur-
day, and it isn't that the Wolver-
ines are better than Notre Dame
and therefore the top team in the
country.
It is, rather, that Bennie Ooster-
baan, who has been having a great
first year at the varsity helm, will
have something to look forward to
when the 1949 season rolls around.
THE THIRD and fourth string-
ers had an opportunity to boost
Michigan's final point total to 41,
and probably 42 when you con-
sider Sophomore end Harry Allis
is rapidly approaching the auto-
matic stage so characteristic of
machine-like Jim Brieske, but
they failed.
Navy's Middies, however,
weren't a bunch to give up. They
had played hard against the
varsity. and. they. didn't quit
when the outcome was evident.
The fact that the jayvees didn't
tally is no reflection on their
collective ability.
Heading the list of the '48 scrubs
who may well turn into the stars
of '49 is Don Dufek, hard-charging
fullback from Northwestern's
backyard in Evanston, Ill. On
three rushes, the 185-pound soph-
omore picked up 15 yards.
MOST SIGNIFICANT of the
three tries was the first, which
saw the powerful plunger hurtle
over three Middies at the line of
scrimmage for an 11 yard gain
and a first down.
Another lad that looked
mighty good was Al Jackson,
who played defensive guard.
He's a boy that may ease the
pain of losing stalwarts Don
Tomasi, Stu Wilkins and Quent
Sickels.

DAN DWORSKY
... vicious block
Bill Ohlenroth, a 205-pound
tackle, was another standout in
the final quarter of the game. The
Chicago offspring showed that he
was ready to take over the defen-
sive duties from either Al Wahl or
Al Wistert, who will probably
move up to offensive positions
when Joe Soboleski and Ralph
Kohn turn in their uniforms.
* * *
AND IT'S ENTIRELY possible
that the husky linesman may take
over one of the offensive slots, if
Osterbaan decides that Wahl and
Wistert are too devastating on de-
fence to move.
There were some other things
that must have made the Michi-
gan mentor smile slightly when

he thought of next year's team.
One was the fine performance
turned in by "Chuckin' Chuck"
Ortmann.
The sophomore sensation proved
beyond doubt that his prowess ex-
tended beyond the tossing of the
pigskin. On 18 rushes, Milwaukee's
finest pranced for 83 yards. On -
only one occasion was the shifty
tailback stopped before plunging
through the line for a gain.
HIS NET YARDAGE was 42, but
38 of the 41 yards lost came about
as a result of being smeared on
flipping attempts.
Leo Koceski, the other half of
the sensational sophomore pair,
came through with an impres-
sive running performance of his
own. Carrying the leather 10
times, the speedy wingback
picked up a net of 66 yards. He,
too, was only stopped once, that
time for a one yard loss.
Dick Rifenburg, Michigan's po-
tential All-American, continued to
impress the onlookers with a dis-
play of pass snaring as he pulled
in two aerials for touchdowns.
Onetof them was the beautiful 60-
yard Ortmann heave for Michi-
gan's final tally.
AND DANNY DWORSKY made
the boys in the know sit up to take
notice once again. Besides his
stellar play on defense, which may
net him an all-American rating,
the Wolverine center executed one
of the finest blocks ever witnessed
on the Ann Arbor turf.
When Wally Teninga inter-
cepted a pass by Nav's Reaves
Baysinger on the Michigan 25,
Dworsky put the kibosh on three
would-be Middie tacklers
around the midfield stripe
which allowed the punting star
to race all the way to the Navy
20. That set up the fourth Wol-
verine score.
Navy didn't have it, but never
once in the contest did the Mid-
dies admit it. They fought on just
as though they were in the game
right up to the final whistle.
Football
Flashes
(By Tihe Associated Press)
MADISON, WIS.-The list of
battered Badgers numbered 14 to-
day as the University of Wisconsin
football squad began drills for
Saturday's intra-state clash with
Marquette.
Of the injured players, however,
only end Tom Bennett was con-
sidered definitely out of the Hill-
top game. Doubtful starters were
centers Bob Wilson and Joe Kelly.
After a light session of calis-
thenics, the squad watched motion
pictures of Saturday's 16-9 loss
to Northwestern and heard scout-
ing reports about Marquette.
COLUMBUS, .-Ohio State
University's football players put
in 30 minutes running through
plays today but did no strenu-
ous work in preparation for next
Saturday's Big Nine game
against Illinois at Champaign.
SOUTH BEND, IND.-Medical
examination showed that Emil
(six-yard) Sitko, Notre Dame right
halfback, had suffered a broken
rib cartilage and might not start
against Northwestern this Satur-
day.
The 175-pound back, leading
ground gainer for the Irish, suf-
fered the injury last week in Notre
Dame's victory over Indiana.

The Wolverine 150 pounders
have tossed off the "pore little
tikes" tag and have jumped right
back into the Big Nine lightweight
title competition.
After taking a decisive polish-
ing at Illinois two weeks before,
the little men were considered by
many as out of the race. They had
gone into that -game as preseason
favorites to take the champion-
ship, but they were left at the
bottom of a 13-6 final score simply
because they were outfought.
* * *
IT WAS A different story at
Ferry Field Saturday. Between the

JERRY BURNS
... finesse

JV's Undefeated in Three
TiltsDespite No Practice

two games the pocket edition
gridders went through gruelling
practice sessions, driven on by the
thought of their ignominious de-
feat.
Coach Keen's praise after the
intrasquad game last week was
the psychological touch that re-
stored their confidence. They
went onto the field Saturday to
win, and their performance
showed that they do not intend
to lose again this season.
The line that had been pushed
all over the field at Champaign
gave the Buckeyes the same treat-
ment. Guards Don O'Connell and
Jere Ogle opened boulevards
through the center of the Ohio
State line for the Wolverine backs.
It was mainly due to their work
that Jerry Burn's fake pass play
worked so well.
* * *
HARD-DRIVING fullback Bud
Marshall took advantage of the
fine line work too, as he con-
tinually was giving the Buckeye
secondaries trouble.
Burns called a good game
from quarterback and handled
the ball with finesse. Despite
the fine drizzle riding on a small
gale across Ferry Field, his pass-
ing was more than effective.
Prentice Ryan's 34 yard romp
on the first touchdown drive and
his race around right end for the
second score had the spectators
on their feet and shouting. Both
Ryan and Johnny Wilcox at the
other halfback slot played with
spirit and turned in sparkling per-
formances.
COACH CLIFF KEEN said af-
ter the game, "The team is greatly,
improved. It was a hard-fought
and well-played game."

Victorious Midgets
Back in Title Race
Team To Meet Wisconsin on Friday
41

SPORTS
hERB RUSKIN, NIGHT EDITOR
Baseball Draft
Could .elevate
Bonus Players
NEW YORK-(P)-The major
League draft meeting at Cincin-
nati, Nov. 10, shapes up as a head-
ache for bonus minded baseball
club owners.
Of the record total of 5,370 elig-
ibles in the annual draft, 270 are
bonus-tag players. There are the
athletes who received figures ex-
ceeding $6,000 to sign, but were
not recalled from the minors by
the big league clubs at the close
of the season.
Among the most publicized -
and highest paid-bonus players
falling into this category are Hugh
Radcliffe and George Zoeterman.
Radcliffe, property of the Phila-
delphia Phillies, is listed on the
Toronto roster. Zoeterman, Chi-
cago Cub chattel, is on the Los An-
geles list.
Other high priced draftable
bonus kids include Charlie Lare,
Mon teral; Bill Smith and Martin
Hansen, Toronto.

Six Teams To Battle for -M
Honors at Wines Field Tonight

By CY CARLTON
Six teams will fight it out for
I.M. football honors, tonight at
Wines Field.
At 6:30, The Newman Club will
meet the Goosers for the inde-
pendent title. At 7:15, Williams
and Greene will take the field for
the Residence Halls crown and at
8:30, Phi Delta Theta will oppose
Beta Theta Pi in quest of the fra-
ternity trophy.
* * *
THE OPENING GAME will see
the Goosers with a strong line
averaging , 180 pounds per man
and a strong offensive threat in
Bud Wallington attempting to
check the Newman Club, a peren-
nial I. M. power. The Newman
outfit thinks differently about
the situation and with both teams
up for the game, a hard-fought
contest is in prospect.
In the second contest, Wil-
liams and Greene may push

each other- around with little
scoring resulting as both teams
are unscored upon in regular
season play. Williams h a s
the record of yielding only three
first downs and has no op-
ponent in their territory. Wil-
liams is sparked offensively by
Bob Fancett and Bob Patton,
the latter a fine ball handling
quarterback.
Greene is an offensive as well
as defensive aggregation and has
scored 108 points in regular sea-
son play. Greene is paced on of-
fense by Bill Baker and Hank
Buchmann. -
PHI DELTA THETA'S hard
charging and speedy team will try
to stop the offensive power of
Beta Theta Pi in the evening's
final contest. The Phi Delts are
primarily a defensive aggrega-
tion and have only yielded nine
points to opposing teams. Their
most recent success was their win
over SAE in the annual Mud Bowl
game for The Traditional Brown
Jug Trophy. The team has shown
itself particularly adept at pass
defense.
The Betas are primarily an
offensive outfit and are out to
smother Phi Delt with long runs
and accurate passing out of the
single win box. Paul Dieth, an
All 1. M. selection from last year
is the scoring ace of the Beta
powerhouse.
All four games promise to be
exciting, hard fought and spec-
tacular affairs with the contes-
tant the best in their various di-
visions. Novevty will be provided by
the Greene Ma tching Band, an old
and familiar sight at; final Resi-
dence Hall Games, having played
at the two previous championship
encounters when Greene House
was a finalist.

Michigan's jayvees continued to
buck the odds and confound the
experts as they rolled to their
third straight win of the season
Friday afternoon, 27-8.
Unable to practice their own
plays since the beginning of the
season, as they generally are used
to run the plays of the coming
varsity opponent, Don Robinson's
crew showed amazing finesse and
held intact their unbeaten record
this year.
S * * *
THEY HAVE BEEN steadily im-
proving and Friday's victory was
close to perfection. Considering
the 'weather conditions under
which they were forced to play-
rain and a soggy field-the jayvees
worked like a well-polished ma-
chine.
Showing poise and confdence,
they made the most of every op-
portunity presented them. The
first touchdown was a result of
the presence of mind of Jim
Moorish. The play was original-
ly a jump pass, and though the
ball was fumbled in the back-
field Moorish picked up the pig-
skin and followed through with
the play.
George Sutherland was going out
for the pass and instead of stop-
ping after he had crossed the spot
the pass was supposed to hit, he
kept on going and got behind the
MSC secondary. Moorish dropped
the ball right in his arms, and he
streaked the remaining distance
for the score.
* * *.
IN THE SECOND half it took
the Wolverines only four plays to
chalk up another marker after a
State punt had gone out of bounds
on the Spartan 16.
Michigan's last two scores
were strictly for the spectators,
wide open and easy to watch.
Jim Bremer streaked 60 yards
down the left sideline, and min-
utes later Bill Jennings moved
unmolested 40 yards for the last
tally.
This play achieved the perefct-
ness in deception which Michi-
gan teams are famous for. The
ball was handled three times in
the backfield, and as Jennings
was heading out for the right side-
line he was completely ignored.
HAL PINK HAD a perfect day
hooting the conversions after each
Wolverine score. Every time he

kicked the pigskin it split the up-
rights. On his last attempt Jim
Moorish couldn't hang on to the
pass from center and Pink never
got a chance to swing his foot.
Defensively the Wolverines
exhibited lots of fight and spirit.
Dave Gomberg and John Ma-
turo played a stellar game on
the line, while Amato Contino
was outstanding in his defensive
fullback position.
The jayvee line suffered two
lapses in the contest, one at the
beginning and the other in the
last canto. State took an unsub-
stantial lead when they trapped
Bill Jennings behind the Wol-
verine line.
MICHIGAN HAD BEEN forced
back to their three on a tremen-
dous 70-yard punt by State's Fred
Skink. Penalties pushed the
Maize and Blue within inches of
the goal, and aided by the unsure
footing a safety resulted for Mich-
igan State.
for
FORMAL
RENTALS
All New - All Sizes
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:I..-

'M' Shows
Crowd Gain
Over_1947
NEW YORK-(P)--Sporting a
80,904 average for four home
games this season, Michigan tops
Midwestern attendance according
to a recent Associated Press sur-
vey.
THE WOLVERINES have drawn
323,614 fans as compared with
284,814 for last season, an increase
of 38,800 persons. Only the Oregon
game was not a sell out.
On the whole throughout the
nation crowds of 1948 are 4 per
cent higher than they were a
year ago, on the average.
The survey indicated that the
crowds attending the home games
of 100 representative schools shows
that the gatherings this year aver-
age 25,546. A year ago the figure
was 24,550.
MUCH OF THE NATURAL in-
crease is the result of much greater
attendance in the southwest con-
ference. The loop, made up of six
Texas colleges and the University
of Arkansas, boasts an increase of
12.5 per cent.
The Midwest attendance zoomed
7.7 per cent while the southern
colleges are playing beforecrowds
that are 4.9 per cent greater.
Mile KNIT
STYLED FOR
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ecial- 3 for $3.25
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Harvel Co., Dept. No. 3
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Please send me knit ties at $1.15
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