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November 03, 1948 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1948-11-03

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PAGE TWO rn itTZNfAI

.111E MICHIGAN DAILY

Republicans Hold 'Watch'
Amid Cheers and Groans

By JOHN DAVIES
It was an amazed and sober
group of Republicans that listened
to the surprising Democratic dis-
play of strength early today at
county headquarters over the
Sugar Bowl Restaurant down
town.
ABOUT 40 University Young
'Republicans sat around card tables
listening to a table radio as they
devoured doughnuts and cider in
the spacious, dingy hall.
Colorful campaign pesters of
assorted sizes papered the room
but center of attention was a
blackboard on which the state
presidential returns were
chalked.
A handful of regular party
members manned the county tally
table at the front of the hall. They
seemed confident from the be-
ginning that the Republicans
would carry all Washtenaw County
offices as they had for the past
80 years.
* * *
WHEN EARLY morning returns
came in, the Young Republicans,
spirit rose as Governor Dewey cut
into the President's popular lead.
Wild shouts greeted the report
that Dewey had taken a lead in
New York and American Laborite
Marcantonio had lost his grip on
New York's 18th Congressional
district.
Buzz of conversation died
down as the frequent popular
presidential vote returns came
in, applause signaling any cut in
Truman's plurality. All eyes fo-
cused on the board when roll call
of latest electoral votes was an-
nounced.
County Republican Chairman
Paul Weins said at 1:15 this morn-
ing that he'd "really hate to have
to predict any outcome."
Dr. Harry Shipman, county
campaign manager, said of Dewey,
"He'll have to pick up a lot of
votes in the outlying district to
win."
JAMES SCHOENER, chairman
of the campus Young Republican
group, said, at 1:30 this morning,
'There seems to be no trend yet."
He said he felt the real question
was control of the Senate and
House of Representatives. .. .. ..
"The Bayer people must be
making a lot of money tonight,"
he added.
Deadsilence or slight groans
greeted Democratic leads in con-
gressional and gubernatorial races.
The possible defeat of Michigan.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
- r

Governor Kim Sigler stunned the
entire. gathering.
During the day the Republicans
had formed a mobilization of cars
to take those to the polls that
had no way of getting there. A
telephone campaign reminding
citizens to vote was also staged.
Uncover Clue
O verlooked
.s. resident
Historians Discover
Thirty-Fourth Chief
Research experts, digging into
history, have unearthed evidence
which indicates we have over-
looked a President.
Instead of 33 men holding the
highest office in the land, we
could, by virtue of a technicality,
list 34.
* * *
AS THE "missing" President is
also a Missourian, there is a
doubt about President Truman's
claim to fame as the first Chief
Executive to hail from the "show-
ne" state.
The gentleman who has thus
for been slighted by the histo-
rical record is David R. Atchi-
son, Senator from Missouri,
1843-55.
The main historical clue to
Atchison's. Presidency is found in
the 1913 edition of the Biographi-
cal Congressional Directory. The
directory reveals that Atchison
was President of the United States
for one day.
According to the World Book
Encyclopedia, President Polk's
term expired onM arch 3rd, at
midnight. Zachary Taylor was not
sworn in as President until March
5, 1849.
At that time there was no Vice-
President, and Atchison had claim
to the presidency because he was
President pro tem of the Senate
and next in line for the job.
Holiness Declining
NEW YORK-There are 137,000
clergymen in the United States, or
about 104 for every 100,000J per-
sons. In 1900rthere were 137 cler-
gymen for every 100,000 men.

Patients in,
'U' Hospital
Lose Vote
Election day was just another
day to most of the 450 voters in
University Hospital.
Probably not more than 20 or
25 of the patients managed to vote
in yesterday's election.
* * *
INTEREST IN the national and
local elections raged high among
some of the patients however.
One patient said he was "just
sick" about not being able to vote.
"But," he said, "I came here a
couple of days ago for an exami-
nation, and they took my pants
away from me So I haven't been
able to get back out."
His room - mate, vociferously
pro-Truman, was more than put-
out by these statements, but man-
aged to restrain himself pretty
well.
When he heard his pet candi-
date called a washout, however, he
started to edge his bed a little
closer and glanced atround for
some handy object to use in more
active campaigning.
Hospital employes said that
several patients had made spe-
cial efforts to get out of the hos-
pital in time to cast their bal-
lots in' person. One patient was
released last week to begin
stumping for a seat in the sen-
ate of his home state.
Probably the greatest interest
in the election was shown on the
TB floors. There the patients are
generally a younger group, very
interested in current affairs.
VOTERS THERE were regis-
tered early this Fall by the two no-
taries in the Hospital, and 14 of
them voted on absentees ballots.
Social Service Workers made ar-
rangements for several other pa-
tients to cast their ballots in ab-
sentia.

MISSOURI WALTZES:
Truman Fights for White House

!.)

The proof of anAmerican Leg-;
end can be found in the life story
of the man who lives in the White
House.
The sixty-four-year-old man
who stepped into the shoes of
Franklin D. Roosevelt three years
ago, literally came up from no-
where to become the President of
the United States.
* * *
THE MAN with the name that
seems to come from a children's
fairy tale was born in a small
town in Missouri, in 1884, the son
of John and Martha Truman.
John and Martha, who had
sidedhwith the Confederacy dur-
ing the Civil war couldn't settle
on a middle name for their son, so
they gave him an initial with no
meaning. Harry S. Truman pro-
ceeded to get the biggest job in
the world.

Truman's beginnings were not
impressive. As a boy, he studiedj
everything he could get his
hands on.
Local legend in Independence
has it that by the age of fifteen he
had read everything in the library.
Under his mother's domination,
he studied piano until he had to
go to work.
For eleven years, until the open-
ing of the first World War he
worked the family farm. Legend,
and there are many of them about

1 11:1 1111:1111L11I- 1 LXX U 1 ~iull L~~l~t ll71Y123t.mz 1

.

heil, and the Argonne, Truman
emerged a major.
Six weeks after the man who
was destined to become Presi-
dent returned from the war, he
married Beth Wallace.
Shortly after that, he went into
the haberdashery business with a
sergeant of his artillery days, Ed
Jacobson. They were caught in the
deflation of 1921 and went broke
to the tune of $35,000. It took
Truman fifteen years to pay off
his debts, but he did it.
* * *

his younger days, says that he AFTER HIS ILL fated venture
could plant the straightest row of into the business world, veteran
corn in Missouri. Truman went into politics. His fa-
* * *ther had been an active Demo-
WITH THE entrance of the U.S. cratic party worker since 1906.
into the war, reservist Truman se- Boss Pendergast gave him the
cured a commission in the field nomination for the job of County
artillery. Leading his battery Judge and he was elected in 1922.
against the Germans at St. Mi- He filled this administrative post

CITIZENS BRA VE LONG WAIT:
Local Vote Jamis Election Machinery

Ann Arbor's 33 voting machines
were completely jammed all yes-
terday and long after closing time
as the largest local vote in history
was clicked off.
Frantic city officials could only
watch as lines blocks long snaked
out of voting buildings and down
streets. Adding 10 new machines
had been only a "drop in the
bucket," they reported.
THE RUSH began almost as the
polls opened yesterday morning,
according to observers. Factory
workers soon swelled the ranks
and citizens were forced to wait
from one to two hours.
The story was the same every-
where in the city's ten precincts.
Voting at a special boath behind

the Fire Department Building
finally closed at 10:30 p.m. after
staying open more than two and
a half hours overtime.
At the city hall, lines stretched
from the city council chambers,
where two voting machines were
located, all the way down the
stairs, out the door and into the
street.
AT TAPPAN Junior High School
-more of the same. Three voting
machines but citizens waited two
hours and even more. Clerk Fred-
erick C. Perry's new system of get-
ting voters in and out of the build-
ing worked but crowds were just
too great.
Hoarse election officials ex-

plained how to operate the vot-
ing machine to voters. They
were successful. One and a half
minutes was the average time
each citizen took.
However, there were some who
took more than ten minutes be-
cause they had forgotten to study
the 13 "Yes" and "No" questions
ahead of time.
THE SAME SAD story always
heard at election time Iwas not
missing this year. An old lady
explained to officials that "she
had just forgotten to register -
and could she just go ahead and
vote anyway?"
"Sorry," was the only answer
she got.

until 1924 when a reform wave
swept the Pendergast machine out
of office. At the same time he
studied nights at the Kansas City
School of Law.
The machine was not killed,
but only stunned by the defeat
in '24 and came back in the
next election.
Truman came back with it, se-
curing the post of presiding judge
of Jackson County. He held this
job until he took his seat in the
Senate in 1935.
In the Senate he voted down
the line with the Democrats. TVA,
social security, AAA, the Wagner
Labor Relations Act all got the
vote of the junior senator from
Missouri.
WITH SIX YEARS experience
in Congress behind him, Truman
began to shine. He sponsored the
bill which created the famous Tru-
man Committee to investigate the
national defense program.
Heading this committee with
a small group of junior senators
and an almost non-existent
budget, Truman proceeded to
make headlines all through the
war.gI
Gen. Brehbn Sommerville, for-
mer chief of the Services of Supply
said that one of Truman's probes
had saved the country two hun-
dred million dollars.
* * *
IT WAS A Truman Committee
suggestion that made FOR set up
the WPM, later renamed WPB.
Standard Oil's connection with
I. G. Farben, the responsibility of
the steel companies for the scrap
shortage, Army-Navy rivalry; all
came under the white-hot glare of
public investigation.
Truman got the Vice-Presi-
dential nomination in what was
term--d the "Second Missouri
Compromise" by the wise boys at
the 1944 convention.
Wallace was unacceptable to the
conservatives, and they were happy
with Truman. He had made no
enemies in his ten years in the
Senate.
Eighty-three days after he took
office, death came to the man in
the White House. The ex-farmer,
veteran, business man and local

'Denis'Gain
Governorship
In Illinois
Douglas Named
To Senate Seat
CHICAGO, Nov. 3-(WecInes-
day) - (P) - Illinois Democrats
won the Governor's office and a
Senate seat today and kept Presi-
dent Truman ahead in the race
for the State's 28 electoral votes.
Gov. Dwight H. Green, Repub-
lican who had served two terms,
conceded to Adlai Stevenson,
Democrat, a Chicago Lawyer who
had served as a U. S. delegate to
the United Nations.
Republican Senator C. Wayland
Brooks conceded defeat by Demo-
crat Paul H. Douglas, University
of Chicago-professor.
Green said returns at midnight
indicated the election of the Dem-
ocratic state ticket.
President Truman clung to a
lead over Thomas E. Dewey, with
a margin that hovered around the
100,000 mark as the vote count
proceeded in the early morning.
Jacob M. Arvy, chairman of the
Cook County (Chicago) Demo-
cratic Committee, said returns in
hand shortly after midnight "in-
dicate President Truman will car-
ry Illinois."
Democrats also swept the con-
tests for major offices in Ctojk
County.
politician had reached the nation's
highest office.
THE STORY of Truman's next
three years is the story of America
after the war.
The end of the war, the Atom
Bomb, reconversion, the formation
of UN, the Truman Doctrine, the
Marshall Plan and the rising ten-
sion between Washington and
Moscow all came upder the hand
of the Man from Missouri in the
White House.
After the first hundred days,
the "honeymoon" with Congress,
Truman had no peace. He fought
through the UN, ERP, helped
set up the biepartisan foreign
policy and got into a/lot of p0-
litical hot water.

j

CLASSIFIED,- ADVERTISING

WANTED

MISCELLANEOUS

WANTED-Four Tickets to Navy or In- BOYS' Laundry done reasonably. 4 days
diana game. Call George, 5938. )2W service. Ph. 2-6760. 609 E. Ann. )3M

WANTED--Three good tickets, together.
Navy, Bill Wynn. 2-6674. )6W
WANTED-2 or 3 Navy tickets. Call Jim
Pratt, Rm. K32, Law Club. )5W
2 NON-STUDENT tickets for Navy game.
Call 2-5258 after 5:30. )3W
FURNISHED Apartment, Hawaii stu-
dent couple. Call L. Louis, 4145, Law
Club. )4W'

FOR SALE

BOWERY BILL
is coming

FOR RENT

Plan to

Starts Thursday ---

Hold Your
DANCES &
DINNERS
at the
AMERICAN LEGION
1035 S. Main Home
Phone 6141

For Information

I

VACANCY for 2 boys in a suite of rooms.
Ph. 2-2052. )7R
WILL exchange 2-bedroom furnished
apartment 1 block from campus for
another in or near city. Call 2-0851.
)4R
TWO LARGE adjoining rooms. 3 miles
from campus. For male students with
own transportation. Call 7571 eve-
nings. )6R
FOR RENT - Football weekend guest
Robms available. Call Student Room
Bureau, 2-8827; 11-12 a.m., 6:30-8 p.m.
)2R
PERSONAL
For your next dance-
or party--
"THE UPTOWN FOUR"
with the vocals of
JUNE MARX
Phone Hugh Jackson 20421 )6P
Your rhyme is perfect.
Your "line" is too.
The question now is:
Who are you? F.B. )8P
FOR SALE!
90 dollar suit of tails. Size 38. 50
bucks. It's a misprint but call Aiex
at 2-0549 and haggle. )2P
CLIFF HOFF ORCH.
features Dave Hildinger, Will Brask
and Homer Marple Ph. 2-8808
3P
DIRECTORY DELAYED!!! Because the
directory printer has had mechanical
difficulties, the 1949 STUDENT DI-
RECTORY will be delayed until next
Monday. )5P
PRE-SCHOOL DAY CARE. Former nurs-
ery school director offers day care in
her own home. Facilities for two chil-
dren, ten dollars for five day week.
Mrs. Gordon Thorpe, 807 Charles St.,
Ypsilanti. One block east of Prospect,
% block south of Holmes Road. )7P

staring
DONALD O'CONN OR
MARJORIE MAIN - PERCY KILBRIDF

Balance Your

TWO Cleveland Orch. Balcony tickets.
At cost price. Ph. 2-2800. )96
1936 FORD, Tudor trunk. Good condi-
tion throughout. Make me an offer.
Chuck Fossati, 1319 Hill. )95
Watch the Daily for the
BIG MICHIGANENSIAN CONTEST! ~
)60
HOUSE-Whitmore Lake, furnished, im-
mediate occupancy. $1200 down. Call
Ed Kozera, 1107 S. State, 2-5584. )98
ONE Servi-cycle in very good condition,
$125. Call 2-3173 (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
weekdays. )5
MOTORCYCLE, Royal Enfield, 1947.
Good condition. 2 spotlights, wind-
shield. Call at 413 S. Forest, Room 7
after 7:00 p.m. )
'44 Club Coupe. Must sell. Highest bid-
der. Good transportation. Call R.
Wood, 2-0805. )99
HIGH SCORING STADIUM FASHIONS
Come in and get your particular
grandstand styles at the
ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP )1
CROSLEY, beautiful, green sedan, late
1947, motor just completely over-
hauled, radio, heater, defroster and
other extras. $625. Will trade. 3060
Washtenaw, 2-7833. )70
RADIO AND TELEVISION
Repairs. Quick Service. Aero Radio,
335 S. Main. Ph. 4997. )6
2 Single Breasted Men's Suits, overcoat,
Topcoat. Complete Tux and Tails.
All size 36-38, and in excellent con-
dition. Ph. 4489. )65
DEENA 8 GORE SLIPS
the fine rayon slip that
WON'T RIDE UP
new longer lengths-white only
$2.95 to $5.95. Sizes 32-36
RANDALL'S
306 South State Street )3
BABY PARAKEETS for training to
talk $6 each. Canaries, bird supplies
and cages. Mrs. Ruff ins, 562 South 7th.
)18
FOR THAT "WARM" LOOK
BALBRIGGEN PAJAMAS
Stripes: Blue, Red.
Solids: Yellow, Coral, Blue
Small - Medium - Large
$3.95
COUSINS ON STATE STREET )2
CROSLEY early 1948 with heater. Orig-
inal owner. 4,000 miles. Excellent con-
dition, $785. Phone 2-2605. )83
PROFITABLE vending machine opera-
tion. Must sell. Graduating Feb-
ruary. Call 25-9468. )87
'37 FORD TUDOR, excellent mechanical
condition, gas heater, seat covers,
runs fine, dependable. Price $350. Call
2-8242, after 12. )89
STUDENTS!
For an Economical Lunch,
Take Home a Quart
(2 Servings)
of Our Genuine
ITALIAN
SPAGHETTI

FOR RENT
NICE quiet room for single male stu-
dent or instructor. No other roomers.
$10.00 weekly, Ph. 2-5101, 1519 Gran-
ger. ) 5R
Rooms all gone for NAVY weekend.
Some for INDIANA GAME.
PIERCE TRANSIENT HOME
1133 East Ann Phone 8144
)8R
HELP WANTED
YOUNG LADY to work at soda fountain
full time, no evenings or Sundays.
Swift's Drug Store, 340 S. State, Ph.
2-0534. )6H
STUDENT SALESMEN-Here is a mon-
eymaker. Attractive. New. Nothing
like it on the market. College men
and women want them for personal
and gift use. Excellent commissions.
Group sales possibilities. Write Box
153, Michigan Daily for interview.
Give qualifications, phone and ad-
dress. )7H
LOST AND FOUND
ARGUS A-2 Camera with leather case.
Reward, Call 4526. )2L
LOST-Man's Wristwatch, stainless steel
case and band. Largeface, three dials.
Reward. Riley, 2-4756. )6L
LOST Brown leather zipper briefcase,
vicinity of Burton Tower. Call Uni-
versity ext. 2339 before 5,.2-3643 eve-
nings. )13L
LOST--Fri. night, black leather wallet
containing money and I.D. for Midge
Schlanderer, Gr. Rapids. Finder please
notify Andrews, 9445. Liberal reward.
)5L
WILL the student who accidentally
picked up my blue covert coat Sat.
night in the. Granada Cafe please
notify me immediately. Bob Mitchell,
223 Adams House, 2-4401. )3L
LOST--Glasses in brown plastic case
(Bender Co., Cincinnati) about noon
Saturday in vicinity of State and
Vaughan Hse. on Fletcher. Needed
desperately. Reward. Ernestine Mas-
ters, 2-5553. )4L
Doors Open Daily 1:30 P.M.
NOW AND THURS. .

WANTED TO BUY
WANTED - One or two non-student
tickets for Navy game. Ph. 2-7477. )4J
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-Car transportation to Wash-
ington, D.C., for Thanksgiving. Call
Clarence Iettler, 2-3236. )2T
STUDENT couple desire ride to and
from New York Thanksgiving week-
end. Ph. 4901, eves. )3T
WANTED TO RENT
WOMAN Graduate needs small apart-
ment beginning next June. Box 152.
3N
MUST RENT house or apartment fairly
near campus. Applicant reliable, seri-
ous student. Best references. Call
20557-Michel. )2N
BUSINESS SERVICES
Hildegarde "NEARLY NEW" Shoppe
Have you clothing that is too short,
tight or of which you have grown
tired? Due to popular demand we
are opening our Nearly New Depart-
ment to turn your used clothing into
ready cash. 109 E. Washington, 2-4669.
)lB
LAUNDRY-Washing and ironing done
in my home. Free pickup and deliv-
ery. Ph. 2-9020. )3B
BOUGHT AND SOLD-Men's used
clothing by Ben the Tailor at Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. )5B
ROYAL TYPEWRITERS
Standards - Portables
Sold - Rented - Repaired
We also buy used typewriters
OFFICE EQUIPMENT SERVICE CO.
1116 S. Univ.,,2-9409 111 S. 4th, 2-1213
)2B
Motion Picture
TITLING
and Editing
Aubertec Phone 8975
)6B
MICHIGAN
- ENDING TODAY -
THE YEAR'S HAPPIEST,
HEARTIEST MUSICAL f

t p ~
<L4UI
N.

COMING SATURDAY -
PAT O'BRIEN Plus T GEORGE BRENT
"FLOWING GOLD" "GOD'S COUNTRY & THE WOMAN"
HOME OF GOOD FOOD0
0 ;;;;;;v
418 East Washington
Phone 9717
V *..*s e r v i n g ..
9 FAMILY-STYLE DINNERS,
and
HIGH CLASS SMORGASBORD
(Come and eat all you want)
Here, in the. surroundings of a warm home, you can find
Swedish smorgasbord at its best and you'll be surprised at
-o the variety of delicacies we have. And for that genuine
"home cooked" food prepared by experts, we can't be beat.
For real eating pleasure, try our tempting meals.
Daily, except Friday, 11:30 to 1:30 and 5:00 to 8:00 P.M.
Sunday, 12 Noon to 6:00 P.M.
Catering to Wedding Breakfasts and Bridge Clubs
--<---OOOLOO O O C)

1 =OMNI

- NORTH MAIN OPPOSITE COURTHOUSE
FROM AIRLINE HOSTESS BLASTING AN
TO HOT-SPOT SONGSTRESS! OUTLAW BLOCKADE!

C ~IH

JMACKa
FRONTIERAGEwt

STARTS TODAY
THRU FRIDAY
Mat. - 20c After 5 - 40c

w.i.t 17-737"Y

iAT ,TO.'N

Stomach and Your
Pocketbook
SDine at
MI ELKE'S

I

I

- Also -
Newest
MARCH

OF TIME

Cafe

ART CINEMA LEAGUE
and AVC present
wrt t P& C
tat"FANY"
IS ANOTHER MASTERPIECE TO BE HONORED
AND PLACED WITH "THE BAKER'S WIFE" AND
"THE WELL-DIGGER'S DAUGHTER"
"FANNY" will ke
you glued to yC
sea ts.

'I

"HARD BOILED EGG"
LATEST NEWS

120 E. Washington St.

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I .

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ep

I

I

GARGOYLE
It's New!
It's Different!

s
90 f
F:v
. <"
.r;
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f

.. JANE -_
:::s> P OW ELL
WALLACE
BEERY in
-03

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1111

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