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October 31, 1948 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-31

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. 194,

IlE MICHI IGAN DAIL

PAGE!E

Student Socialists Club Holds
First Organizational Meeting

DUTIES TIRING:
County Chairmen Welcome Election

A new campus political group
has joined the ranks-the Student
Socialists Club.
Formed to bring together mem-
bers and student interested in
the national Socialist Party, the
group plans to draw up a consti-
tution in the near future and ap-
ply for recognition by the Student
Affairs Committee.
At the first meeting Friday the
following temporary officers were
elected by the turnout of 15 stu-
dents: Pat Stites, chairman; Toy-

oaki Yamada, secretary; Edith
Becker, treasurer.
Differences between the Social-
ist and Progressive parties were
discussed. Plans were also laid
to distribute campaign literature
over the weekend and on election
day.
Miss Stites explained the club's
program as being both for edu-
cational and political action pur-
poses. She also urged interested
students to attend the next meet-
ing at 8 p. m. Wednesday, at 1472
University Terrace apartments.

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for panhel hall

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By AL BLUMROSEN
When the results are all in Wed-
nesday morning, three men in
Washtenaw County will be more
grateful than most for the chance
to rest from the gruelling cam-
paign.
These are the county chairmen
of the three parties, who have di-
rected the local campaign.
Speeches, radio programs, cards,
leaflets and meetings on a big
scale have marked the election
battle which is supposed to bring
out the largest vote in Wash-
tenaw County's history. All this
was the responsibility of the
county chairmen.
* * *
Democrats
The man who is local field gen-
eral for the Democratic party,
Louis G. Forsythe was a Repub-
lican, for over half his life.
HIS PARENTS had been Re-
publicans since shortly after the
civil war when the GOP was the
liberal party. He was raised in a
Republican atmosphere on a farm
near Ann 'Arbor.
"My parents had a liberal
point of view," he said. "They
were always interested in the
welfare of every class of peo-
ple."
Forsythe stuck to the Repub-
licans through the presidency of
Teddy Roosevelt who, he said, had
a liberal administration. He left
the party in 1916 to vote for!
Woodrow Wilson and returned to
the GOP in the twenties.
* * *
"I WAS disillusioned by the turn
of events and in 1932 found my-
self in sympathy with the heroic
efforts of Franklin Roosevelt to
bring order out of chaos," he said.
Since 1932, Forsythe has been
firmly in the ranks of the local

Democratic party. He retired in
1946 after 29 years as principal
of Ann Arbor High School and
had his first opportunity to take
an active part in partisan poli-
tics.
The' position of running the
Democratic Party in a Republican
area does not faze Forsythe. "Pros-
perous Washtenaw County has
been conservative] for years, but
now conditions are changing,'" he
said. "Thoughtful people are be-
ginning to realize that some atten-
tion must be paid to the more
unfortunate classes."
* * *
Republicans
The field commander of the
Republican forces in Washtenaw
County this year is George Wines.
Wines, a Ypsilanti attorney,
has been in the Republican Party
for over 20 years, "since I was
first able to vote."
* * *
WINES WAS BORN in Detroit
and came to Ypsilanti in 1931. In
1932 he was president of the Young
Pepublicans Club in Ypsi.
Wines has followed the GOP
because, "I feel that the Repub-
licans have consistently followed
the American doctrine of Free-
dom. This includes freedom from
superficial regulations and regi-
mentation by government."
Wines said that the Republicans
had stayed away from bureaucracy
and all foreign ideologies, includ-
ing fascism.
* * *
FREEDOM is our most vital
heritage and it must be protected,
Wines added, in giving his reasons
for his attachment to the Re-
publican Party.
This year's campaign by the
Washtenaw Republicans was char-
acterized as "about the same as
in previous years," by Wines.

"I can tell more about it after
the election is over," he said.
Progressieves
Bret Miller has had by far the
toughest job of any of the County
Chairmen.
He set up from scratch the ma-
chinery for the Wallace Progres-
sives in Washtenaw County.
* * *
MILLER supervised the setting
up of committees and the circu-
lation of petitions in the spring
to get the Progressives on the
ballot.
Since then the local progres-
sives have waged a full scale
campaign that Miller predicts
will get 10,000 votes for Wallace.
Miller, like Forsythe, spent the
early part of his politiical career
in the Republican Party, on the
State Central Committee in Cali-
fornia. He went over to the Demo-
crats when Roosevelt was elected
and then, after FDR's death saw
that that party was, "slowly but
surely destroying all that he
(FDR) and his supporters had
worked for."
MILLER DID not like Truman's
"negative attitude on labor and
civil rights, his weak support of
price control and housing" and
his "road-to-war program."
We were ready for Henry Wal-
lace when he began his cam-
paign to get representation for
the common man and carry out
Roosevelt's program, Miller said.
Miller received his BA from
Lincoln University of Missouri and
did graduate work at the Uni-
versity.
He summed up his philosophy
saying that if the Progressives
never elect a candidate, they have
accomplished their purpose, of
changing the thinking of the peo-
ple from war to peace.

We

_ COLLEGE SHOP

! .1

hc

F
J

ive the
\.
ormal
UST
FOR
J t "

Li'ttle Lamb.
Big news on the f ashion scene
... the little coat of versatile
Mouton. Finger-tip length
topper smartly collared and
cuf fed . ..it; i.ipling back
fullness. To wea anytnme,
anyvwvei .- . he bi est coat
in your wardrobe. Misses
sizes, in logwood brown,
125O
plus tax
COATS-SECOND FLOOR

6 d

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

f _ _ _ ''

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the office of the
Assistant to the Presdent, Room 1021
Angell Hall, by 3:00 p.m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a.m. Satur-
days.)
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1948
VOL. LIX, No. 35
Notices
Student Tea: President and Mrs.
Ruthven will be at home to stu-
dents from 4 to 6 o'clock, Wed.,
Nov. 3.

Faculty, College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts: Meeting
4:10 p.m., Mon., Nov. 1, 1025 An-
gell Hall.
AGENDA
1. Consideration of the min-
utes of the meeting of Oct. 4, 1948
(pp. 1439-1451).
2. Consideration of reports
submitted with the call to this
meeting.
a. Executive Committee-Prof.
A. W. Bromage.
b. Executive Board of the
Graduate School-Prof. I. A.
Leonard.

j4IihCOu

SINI

r

c. Senate Advisory Committee
on University Affairs-Prof. R.
C. Angell. No report.
d. Deans' Conference - Dean
Hayward Keniston. No report.
3. Report of the Committee on
Examinations.
4. Announcements.
5. New business.
1949 Student Directory will be
on sale at the Diag, Engine Arch,
Union, Willow bus stop and Michi-
gan League next Tues., Nov. 2.
Influenza Injections Advised:
1. Students warned of last
chance to get free injections.
(Continued on Page 3)
/

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