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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 21, 1948 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-09-21

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMWBER 21, 1948

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Famous Faces Featured
In 'U' Oratorical Series
With the promise of another top-notch season, the University
Oratorical Association is this year presenting an outstanding array
of guest lecturers.
The University lecture course, the oldest 'in the country, will
start off the season Oct. 12. Making the initial lecture wlil be
'Robert Magidoff.
His dramatic deportation from Russia last spring will be high-
lighted in his speech "Why I Was Expelled from the Soviet Union."
* * * *
ANOTHER CORRESPONDENT will take the stage Nov. 1, when
Raymond Gram Swing comes to Hill Auditorium to discuss "History
on the March."
Following Swing in the lecture series is Rebecca West, British
author and journalist, who will enlarge on her best-seller "The
Meaning of Treason" on Nov. 10, when she discusses "Famous
Trials."
The series will switch to a lighter vein Nov. 19, with John Mason
Brown, Broadway critic and author.
* * * *
AFTER AN EXTENDED Christmas vacation, the lecture course
resumes Feb. 24, when author-actress Cornelia Otis Skinner returns
here with another solo dramatic program.
Eve Curie, another famous daughter of a famous family, will
return to Ann Arbor to speak on "France-Struggle for Freedom."
Miss Curie was a journalist-observer on World War II battle
fronts, and is now directing her energy toward preserving French
democracy.
FINAL LECTURE in the series will be given by Herbert Agar,
English governmental official for the past decade, who will speak
from first-hand knowledge when he discusses "England Today" on
March 10.
Season tickets for the complete course are on sale daily from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 2 to 5 p.m. daily, except Saturday afternoon
and Sunday, at the Hill Auditorium box office.

i

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

Ta q
Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the office of
the Assistant to the President, Room
1021 Angell Hall, by 3:00 p.m. on the
day preceding publication (11:00
a.m. Saturdays).
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1948
VOL. LIX, No. 1
Notices
Directories: Call Extension 696 in the
Business Office and order the number
of faculty directories needed in your
department. Delivery will be made by
campus mail when directories are avail-
able, presumably about October 21.
Herbert G. Watkins
Secretary
Faculty Members. To avoid delay in
delivery of United States mail have

your correspondents use your depart-
mental or office address, not simply
"University of Michigan."
Users of the D.O.B.-Because of the
inordinate length of the Daily Official
Bulletin the Editor is obliged to warn
users of the Bulletin that no notice
will be printed more than twice and
furthermore, that the Editor expects to
use his own judgment in reducing un-
reasonably long notices to reasonable
length.
Frank E. Robbins
Assistant to the President
Users of the Daily Official Bulletin:
Need of conserving space makes neces-
sary the following announcements. (1)
Notices of meetings of organizations
will be restricted to the name of the
organization concerned, day, time, and
place of meeting, and name of speaker
and subject. (2) Notices for the D.O.B.
must be typewritten and should be dou-
ble-spaced for editorial convenience.
F. E. Robbins
Approved student organizations plan-
ning to be active during the present
semester must file in the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs, Room 2, University Hall,
before October 1, the following informa-
tion: (1) a list of members, (2) the
signed acceptance of a member of the
faculty who is willingato act as advisor
to the group.

Fraternal groups without houses are
requested to call at the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs, Room 2, University Hall,
to secure membership report forms.
These reports are due September 24.
Honor Societies are requested to file
the names of officers in the Office of
Student Affairs, Room 2, University
Hall.
Student organizations are notified of
the following regulation governing dis-
tribution of publicity materials for stu-
dent sponsored activities:
No handbills or other printed matter
shall be distributed or posted on the
campus, in University Buildings, or in
front of University Buildings. Hand-
bills, signs, and printed matter not in-
consistent with good taste may be
posted on bulletin boards in campus
buildings, but not elsewhere.
Office of Student Affairs
Room 2, University Hall
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS-Proced-
ures for recognition, continued recog-
nition, withdrawal of recognition:
The Committee on Student Affairs,
which includes both students and fac-
ulty in its membership, has been given
responsibility for official recognition of
student groups or organizations.
Requests for recognition should be

submitted to the chairman of the Com-
mittee onStudent Affairs. As much
information as possible should be given
about the group or organization includ-
ing (1) a copy of the proposed consti-
tution (for form, see Robert's "Rules
of Order, Revised"); (2) a list of pros-
pective members, and (3) a statement
of objectives. In addition, an accept-
ance from a member of the faculty
whichindicates a willingness to act as
adviser of the organization if official
recognition is granted, must accompany,
the request for recognition. These re-
quirements will be modified for stu-
dent groups sponsored by Ann Arbor
churches and /or the Student Religious
Association.
Bases for recognition. Official recog-
nition may be granted provided that (1)
in general, the. petitioning group have
a minimum of thirty students; (2) the
proposed organization genuinely repre-
sents the interests of students; (3) the
organization's program and direction
is in the hands of student members;
THE GOAT'S NEST I
SCERAMIC STUDU)
announces registration for
fall classes starting Sept. 21.
Studio privileges available
., with consultation and in-
struction by Harvey Little-
ton.bStudent's work now on
exhibit. Studio hours: after-
noons from 1-4; Wed. and
Thurs. Eve's. 7-9.
512 South Main St.
Ann Arbor, Phone 4970

ti

(4) a faculty member has agreed to act
as adviser; (5) the activities of the or-
ganization will not unduly interfere
with the primary educational pursuits
of student members; (6) the purposes
of the proposed organization are not
inconsistent with the broad educational
objectives of the University; and (7)
the proposed organization, or organiza-
tions with which it may be affiliated
by name or otherwise, do not engage
in subversive activities against the gov-
ernment of the United States or the
states, or advocate the overthrow of
these governments by force.
Continued recognition. In order to
remain on the list of officially recog-
nized student organizations it is re-
quired (1) that organizations continue
to meet the conditions for initial recog-
nition previously stated; (2) that each
organization register the names of its
officers and members with the Office
of Student Affairs at the beginning of
each semester or summer session; (3)
that additions to membership be rek

ported to the Office of Student Affairs
promptly; (4) that any changes in or-
ganizational structure, objectives, ac-
tivities, basis of membership, or. affili:
ations with other organizations, either
local or national, be presented to the
Committee on Student Affairs for con-
sideration and not be consummated
until approval is given by the Com-
Smittee.
Procedure for withdrawal of recog-
nition. Action directed toward with-
drawal of official recognition may be
instituted directly by the Committee
on Student Affairs or through the Com-
mittee upon the request of the Presi-
dent of the University. In either in-
stance, immediate responsibility for
further investigation will be taken by
the Committee. After investigation and
reviev of the evidence obtainable, offi-
cers of the organization concerned will
be heard by the Committee. If official
recognition is subsequently withdrawn
by the Committee the reasons therefor
(Continued on Page 4)

+ Classified Advertising +

Today and
Wednesday!

Continuous
from 1 P.M.

COOL

Tw~

FOR SALE
MOTORCYCLE, 1944 GI Indian, fair
condition. Leaving U.S. $275 or dicker.
Pete Hill, 721 Catherine St., Ph. 6293.
)17
LADIES' balloon-tire bicycle. Call
2-3851. )16
COMPLETE HOSIERY LINES
newest shades - every size
SMARTEST HOSIERY SHOPPE
Michigan Theatre Building
)15
FRENCH LINGUAPHONE practically
new with instruction books. Costs
$50.00. Will sell for $20. Call 2-0207.
) 14
WEBSTER RECORD CHANGER. Good
condition, $40.00. Call Phebe 2-0946
after 5:30 or University Extension
436. )13
BABY PARAKEETS-Beautiful singing
canaries. Bird supplies and cages.
Ruffins Melody Bird Shop, 562 S. 7th.
)18
PHILCO - Combination radio-auto-
matic changer in good condition. Ph.
8883. )1i
SEALY HOLLYWOOD bed (full size);
maple twin bed and dresser. All prac-
tically new. J. W. Stone. 1450 Uni-
versity Terrace Phone 5695. )2
MICROSCOPE and typewriter -- Call
4058-David Sun evenings. Excellent
condition. )3
FOR SALE--Cushman motor scooter-
Transmission. Buddy seat. Excellent
condition. 1323 Geddes Ave. Apt. 1-
evenings.)4
BEAUTIFUL Italian oak refrectory
table, two benches, two cabinets with
doors. Suitable for large hall, 11-
braries, recreation rooms, church
parlor or study, auditoriums. 510
Lodge Drive, Detroit. Valley 2-0234. )5
DORM TOWELS BY CANNON
75c
MATCHING WASH CLOTHS
10c
COUSINS ON STATE STREET
TYPEWRITERS: Factory rebuilt. Guar-
anteed 1 year. Also language type
machines $50 and up. Portables. Aero
Radio. 335 So. Main. )7
YES, those same corduroys by Koret
you saw in Mademoiselle you'll see
at the ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP.
K AND E slide rule and drawing set.
Used one semester. Phone 2-8754. )9
1939 Plymouth Coupe. Call Whitmore
Lake, 2021. )10
FOR SALE-Slide rules, leather cases,
one K & E Log Log Duplex, one
Dietzgen poly phase. Call Jack,
2-7816, after 6 p.m. )11
BY OWNER-5%2 rooms and basement,
2% car garage, 5 blocks from campus,
partially furnished, immediate pos-
session, $7,200. Ph. 2-8333 after 7 p.m.
)12
MISCELLANEOUS
DO YOU like to hear yourself talk?
Everyone else does. Rent a wire re-
corder for parties, rushing, speech
improvement or what have you. Im-
mediate playback. Reasonable hourly
rate. Phone 2-6611 after five. )1M

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Pair of bone-rim glasses in vi-
cinity of new Bus. Adm. Bldg. If found
call 8257. )2L
HITCHHIKERS left blanket in stu-
dent's car, Sun., Whitmore Lk. Call
Ev. 2-8300. )lL
LOST 1947 Class ring in Men's Union
Lounge. Sentimental value. Please
return. Reward. Initials inside, J S.
Cassis. Ph. 2-0575 )3L
WANTED
BABY SITTER Monday, Wednesday,
Friday, 2:15-3:15. One block from
Campus Call 29475. )W
READER for blind student. Call Ran-
dall Nelson, 2-2217, after 4 p.m. )2W
COUPLE leaving Willow Village. Call
Whilmore Lake, 2021. )3W
PERSONAL laundry for girls. Sorority
houses preferred. Phone Whitmore
Lake 4804. )4W
BUSINESS SERVICES
ALTERATIONS - Restyling - Custom
clothes, Hildegarde Shoppe, 109 E.
Washington, Telephone 2-4669. )lB
IRESSMAKING-Custom-mode suits,
Tailoring and Alterations. Specializ-
ing in Tailor-made buttonholes. Ph,
2-6583. )2B
LAUNDRY-Washing and ironing done
in my home.2Free pickup and deliv
ery. Ph. 2-9020. )3B
HELP WANTED
READERS WANTED for 6-10 hours a
week at 85 cents an hour. Should be
psychology or sociology students,
senior or graduate standing. Contact
M. Wagman at 108 Hayden House,
East Quad. Phone 2-4591. )6H
MALE: Part time. 6 days. Evenings and
days. Apply SPUDNUT SHOPPE, 622
E. Liberty after 4 p.m. )5H
MALE STUDENT table waiting 11:30-
1:30, every day. Jennings Restaurant,
1015 E. Ann. )4H
GIRL TO DO housework in small
. apartment part time. Phone 8768. )3H
COUNTER girl for snack bar, part-time
work. Student's wife preferred. Cam-
pus section. Phone 5464. )2H
FULL and part-time help at soda
fountain. Swift's Drug Store, 340 S.
State Street, phone 2-0534. )1H
PERSONAL
NEARLY 95% of the 1948 graduating
class had their picture in the Mich-
Miganensian. SENIORS - make your
appointment now for the 1949 'Enslan
at the Student Publications Office-
2nd floor-any time this week. )1P
Did You Know This About
RANDALL'S?
We are now featuring the
Ship "N" Shore
long sleeved plaid shirt, $3.95
)2P
ROOMS FOR RENT
GRADUATE WOMEN - Comfortable
rooms in modern home at Whitmore
Lake. On bus line. Call 5343 Ann
Arbor mornings or evenings. )1R
MICHIGAN
-Today and Wednesday-
Here They Come...
on dancing
feet!

STAGE COACH
INN
AA STEAKS - SEA FOODS
FRIED CHICKEN
PARTIES - BANQUETS
RECEPTIONS
For Reservations Call 6004
503 East Huron St.

HOME of GOOFOOD
418East Washington
Phone 9717
i serving
n FAMILY-STYLE DINNERS A
Lunch 11:30 A.M. to 1:30 P.M.
0 ~ ~~~~als,,o__ _ _ __-
O High Class SMORGASBORD
(Come and eat all you want)
Daily, except Friday, 11:30 to 1:30 and 5:00 to 8:00 P.M.
Sunday, 12 Noon to 6:00 P.M.
Catering to Wedding Breakfast and Bridge Clubs

IH[ AIL ILI1KiS
Nor/h University Jewelers
(xv HaySPECIAL!
xtra Heavy Sterling Ident. Bracelet
.18.00value ... for $8.95
(Tax Included)
WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIRING
E A
~a~e teiir
338 MAYNARD STREET
--THRU THE ARCADE---
Lunch 11 to 1:30 ... Dinner 5 to 7:00
Sunday 12 to 2:30 and 5 to 7:00
DAILY, SPECIALS

___ _

University of Michigan Oratorical Association

HILL
Auditorium

LECTUR

COURSE

1948
1949

Raymond Gram Swing

John Mason Brown

Also -
"HOT CROSS BUNNY" -

_1

WORLD NEWS

Coming Thursday! "Adventures of Robin Hood"

We Are Famous for Just
"ODFO

Seven Outstanding Numbers
Oct. 12 ROBERT MAGIDOFF
The radio correspondent whose dramatic expulsion from
Russia last April helped seal the Iron Curtain, brings an
uncensored report on the conditions in and the objectives
of contemporary Russia. His daily broadcasts from Moscow
during the -tense days of the war were heard by millions
of Americans.
"WHY I WAS EXPELLED FROM THE SOVIET UNION"
Nov. 1 RAYMOND GRAM SWING
The famous broadcaster whose incisive analyses of wartime
events won him a greater audience than that of any other
non-political personality, will appraise the clashes and crises
of today. He is the first commentator to have won the
two "Oscars" of broadcasting, the Dupont and Peabody
awards.
"HISTORY ON THE MARCH"
Nov. 10 REBECCA WEST
The brilliant British author of the widely acclaimed "The
Meaning of Treason" will enlarge upon the theme of that
book in her lecture. Having covered the Nurenberg and
British treason trials and the lynching trial last June at
Greenville, S.C., she is well qualified to speak on this inter-
esting and vital subject.
"FAMOUS TRIALS"

Robert Magidoff Herbert Agar
Nov. 19 JOHN MASON BROWN
Associate Editor of The "Saturday Review of Literature, is
returning by popular request for the third successive season
to present his kaleidoscopic and witty commentary on
current literature and the Broadway theatre. The audience
is assured a stimulating and entertaining evening.
"BROADWAY IN REVIEW"
Feb. 24 CORNELIA OTIS SKINNER
The distinguished actress, will return to Hill Auditorium for
her third appearance. On this occasion she will present
her colorful multi-part drama "The Wives of Henry VIII."
Originally presented in London and then having a long
run in New York, this solo drama will offer unusual and
delightful entertainment.
"THE WIVES OF HENRY VIII"
Mar. 3 EVE CURIE
One of the world's best known women and author of the
biography of her famous mother, Miss Curie is now the co-
publisher of, the second largest newspaper in France. She
will discuss the vital problems that confront her native
country and that influence the peace of the world.
"FRANCE-STRUGGLE FOR CIVILIZATION"
Mar. 10 HERBERT AGAR
Former special assistant to Ambassadors John G. Winant
and W. Averell Harriman and former chief of the United
States Information Service in London, Mr. Agar speaks with
eloquence and understanding on conditions in England. His
book, "The People's Choice," won the 1933 Pulitzer Prize'
in American history.
"ENGLAND TODAY"

OPEN
7:30 A.M.
to 1 A.M.

at the Wolverine
E.N

OPEN
7:30 A.M.
to 1 A.M.

1311 South U.

doors east of
oath Forest Ave.

~-.'
DAN
DAILEY
MREGARDs

Season Tickets
(Seven Numbers)

MAIN FLOOR .........$7.50
FIRST BALCONY .....$6.30
SECOND BALCONY ... $5.10
(Tax Included)

Now serving

Rebecca West

Cornelia Otis Skinner

Eve Curie

SBreakfast at 7:30 A.M.
Lunch at 11 A.M.
tIinner at 5 P.M.

and your choice of "delicious morsels" for "in between snacks" -
THE FINEST FOOD AVAILABLE IN TOWN
TABLE SERVICE - COURTEOUS SERVICE
"GOOD FOOD" "GOOD FOOD"

with
Nancy GUILD
Charles WINNINGER
Charlie RUGGLES
Fay BAINTER

Season Tickets
Now on $ale
Box Office Hours:
10 1 2 D i y .. .....:.:.:.::.

CO LO , J 7 " mo

i

I

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