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October 20, 1948 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-20

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 194g

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

___________ -_'!H1' K_2__-' I!E. . .

Gophers Seek Recovery
Of 'ithe little Brown Jug'

' f1If l li

11

TALKING SHOP
with Bud Weidenthal
Associate Sporis Editor

Fonville ToUndergo Operation

Traditional Football Rivalry Dates
To Tie with Yost's Point-A-Minute

Back
Stars

I njury To Back Will Sideline
MightyShot-Putter for Year

By B. S. BROWN
The Golden Gophers from up
north are acting up again this
year.
Ever since the series started
back in 1892, the Minnesota maul-
ers have been trying to repeat
their performance of thatryear,
when they sent the Wolverines
scampering in defeat, 16-6.
Their success has been limited.
In 56 years Michigan has won 23
games while bowing on only 13
occasions. There have been two
ties.
But the most interesting phase
of the intense rivalry began in
1903, when Fielding Yost took
one of his famous point-a-min-
ute teams out to Minneapolis.
The game was billed as "The
championship game of the west."
The Wolverines had gone
through a perfect season up to
that November day,. Yost's ma-
gicians had piled up 559 points
during the season and had held
the opposition scoreless.
At the end of the afternoon,
Yost was no longer a happy man.
Minnesota had reared up in de-
fiance and walked off the field at
the final whistle, proud possessors
of a 6-6 tie. The Gopher home-
folk proceeded to tear the town
apart, wild-eyed over the moral
victory.
The excitement was intense
enough so as to make the Mich-
igan trainer forget to carry off
the brown earthen jug which held
the team's drinking water.
Oscar Munson, Minnesota
equipment man, picked up the

jug and held on to it. Upon dis-
covering its 'loss several days
later, Yost asked Minnesota au-
thorities to return it to Ann
Arbor. The reply was, in effect,
"Come and get it."
The two teams were not to meet
again until 1909, but someone re-
membered the jug. Before the
game that year, Minnesota pro-
duced the prize. Michigan won the
contest and back to Ann Arbor it
went.
Thus began the fabled history
of the "Little Brown Jug." Mich-
igan kept the Jug the following
year as it again downed the North-
men.
When the two schools again
met, it was 1919 and Minnesota
immediately celebrated the re-
newal of warfare by winning the
Jug for the clan.
The next year, it was the Wol-
verines' turn to win back what
had, originally been Maize and
Blue property. And for seven
consecutive years the Jug found
refuge in Ann Arbor town.
The Gophers won it again in
1927, but then took a back seat
as their brethren from across the
plains compiled a five-game
winning streak.
Minneapolis cans last had an
opportunity to admire the Jug in
1942 when Minnesota trounced the
Wolverines. Since then the earth-
enware has resided in the trophy
case at the Athletic Administra-
tion Building, except for brief air-
ings on the days of the games,
when it is kept on the sidelines.

Charlie didn't say a word-not a complaint, not an excuse.
His first thought after failing to qualify for the United States
Olympic team at Evanston this summer was to dash over to his team-
mate who still had a chance and shout words of encouragement to
him.
This was typical of Charlie Fonville, probably one of the
finest athletes ever to compete at the University of Michigan.
He was showing the courage and determination as well as the
leadership that caused his teammates to elect him their captain.
All of us who were close to the Michigan contingent at Evanston
that weekend early last July, were aware that the holder of the world's
shot put record was not in good physical condition.
It was general knowledge that he had spent the previous five
days flat on his back in a hospital bed, we were aware that he would
be going into the all-important trials cold.
And yet there wasn't a complaint, not an excuse, not a whim-
per ... Charlie was not the kind to make excuses.
When we visited him in his hotel room the day of the meet there

Wolverines Show Too Much
Speed for Minnesota-Voigts
0.

(Continued from Page 1)
were held just one week later at
Milwaukee.
Instead, he entered a meet in
Buffalo on the same weekend.
Because he was not up to his
usual par at Buffalo, he was sent
directly to Ann Arbor for observa-
tion, prior to going to Evanston
for the Olympic trials.
HE SPENT FIVE DAYS at the
University Hospital and was re-
leased on the Monday before the
big meet in Evanston. Although
his injured back gave him a con-
siderable handicap, Fonville was
favored to top the field at the
Olympic trials.
The Michigan ace gave every
indication that he was not in top
shape when he fouled twice in
three tries but was able to take
a third in the qualifying round
as a result of his first toss
which went 53 feet 1 3-4 inches.
The next day, however, he fin-
ished fourth in the final trials. Be-
cause it was necessary under the
U.S. Olympic rules to place at
least third in the final trials,
Charlie was not on the big boat
that sailed for London later that
month.
FOLLOWING HIS disappoint-
ment at Evanston, it was thought
best that Charlie rest up during
the Summer and try to heal his
back. Following this advice, Fon-
ville was completely inactive this
summer and eagerly awaited his
return to school so he could take
another crack at the big iron ball.
He reported to Coach Can-
ham on the first day of school,
and said he felt a little stiff.
Canham told him to take easy
workouts, consisting of light
.joggging, and stretching exer-
cises.
Even after this Charlie felt the*
same old pain that bothered him

SPORTS
ROG GOELZ, Night Editor
last spring, so he was turned over
to Drs. O'Connor and Badgley at
the University Hospital. It was
only after three weeks of observa-
tion and intensive study of X-rays
that the operation was decided
to be the best thing.
IT IS EVIDENT that this was
no snap decision. Canham said
that the doctors reported that
another year of competition might
be possible in Fonville's case, but
that the operation had to take
place some time.
Taking a sincere interest in
Charlie, Canham decided that it
was far better to have the opera-
tion take place than to risk per-
manent injury to one of Mich-
igan's great athletes. Canham said
that it is quite improbable that
Fonville will ever compete for
Michigan again. He is slated to
receive a degree next June.
Bir Nine

CHICAGO -(P)--Michigan, the
nation's top-ranked team, has too
much speed for brawny Minnesota,
but the tricky Wolverines will
know they're in a football game
against the Gophers at Minneap-
olis Saturday.
That's the opinion of Bob Voigts
whose Northwestern Wildcats were
spilled by Michigan, 28-0, last Sat-
urday after whipping Minnesota,
19-16, the previous week.
Voigts twas cautious in his ap-
praisal of the "Little Brown Jug"
classic in which once-defeated
Minnesota will make its biggest
Rose Bowl bid of the season
against the cannon-balling Wol-
verines.
"No matter which team is up or,
down before this game," Voigts'
declared at a football writers'

meeting, "this rivalry always is a
scorcher and you can forget all
about the form sheet."
Voigts recalled last year's con-
test in which a Michigan team
regarded as slicker than this year's
powerhouse had to fight desper-
ately for a 13-6 win over a Minne-
sota eleven drubbed, 40-13, b~y Il-
linois the previous week.
"A lot of people say Minnesota
should have won that game,"said
Voigts, "and that's the way it could
go again. It'll be a dog-fight, but
Michigan has too much speed for
Minnesota."
Difference in line play was a
major factor in Michigan's win
"Michigan was getting tine jump
on our line, anticipating our ball
snap ahead of our own linemen,"
said the Wildcat boss.

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was not a mention of trouble, not a sign of distress-just the same
old confident Fonville...
"Sure I'm OK," he said, "no, my back doesn't bother me. I'm going
to do my best." (He was never one to waste any words.)
As we left his room we were full of admiration for the guy. He
was our ideal of a real athlete and we kept our fingers crossed.
After the first day of the trials the name of Fonville was on
the lips of every newspaperman and track coach in town. His per-
formance had been only mediocre and the possibility of l4is not
making the team was not at all remote.
They were talking in whispers of his injured back that had both-
ered him for months and had kept him from participating in the Na-
tional AAU's the previous week. Was it that which was hindering
him?
Still no excuses.
Well they were right all along-his back had gotten progressively
worse and that forced stretch in the hospital had done him no good.
His timing was off and he constantly was in pain.
And yet when reporters rushed over to the Michigan marvel
following his failure the next day, Pe said only this, "I really have
no excuse at all. My injured back felt fine."
To our way of thinking this is the apex of real courage and true
character. It was typical of Charlie Fonville in every respect.
His tremendous desire to gain the ultimate objective of all ath-
letes, the Olympics games, was quite obvious.
Those long hours of tedious, boresome practice, long after his
teammates had hit the showers and were on their way home was
evidence enough to us that it was one thing that he wanted more than
anything else.
So when the announcement came up to the press box that
afternoon 'that Charlie wasn't going to make the boat a lump
came to out throat, we wanted to throw in the towel.
But when we saw him step from the putters circle and run over
,to Eck Koutanan, who was competing in the hop, step and jump, and
pat him on the back, we knew we were witnessing a true display of
courage.
The kind of courage that marks him as one of the all-time greats
of Michigan.

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