100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 17, 1948 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1948

TITP MTCT°'A~T flATTV.

,:A it r4 IVA 1L 1111irMJN X-P M11J 1 ",.

What's Up in the Dorms

(EDITOR'S NOTE: All University-
approved residence halls wishing to
contribute to What's Up in the
Dorms should contact Dolores Palank-
er at The Daily or 105 Betsy Barbour.)
Rumor has it that men of Ad-
ams House, West Quad, have
abandoned the fair, fickle sex for
their fairer, less fickle television
set acquired last week.
To prove that such is not the
case, the House is having a hay-
ride Oct. 23.
* * *
NEVERTHELESS, they've given
up listening parties-they now
have watching parties. So far the
T-V screen has offered football
games on week-ends and wrestling
and boxing matches during the
week as well as other less sporty
features.
The announcement of Adams
House officers for the fall sem-
ester lists the following: Bob
Paul, president; Tom Rice, so-
cial chairman; Carl Raiss, ath-
letic chairman; Dan Palmer,
Larry O'Dell, Tom Schulte,
Chuck Hoheisel, Dick Stoner,
Gordon Saxon, Bernie Schroll,
Jim Morse and Mark Ardis,
floor representatives.

From these representatives,
Bernie Schroll was made secre-
tary-treasurer, Jim Morse, aca-
demic chairman, and Chuck Ho-
heisel, judiciary chairman. Bob
Greager was appointed to organ-
ize the Homecoming display.
THE BATTLE FOR football
tickets took an amusing turn at
Michigan House, West Quad.
On the bulletin board appear-
ed a large sheet of typing pa-
per expressing the poster's de-
sire to "beg, borrow or steal't, a
Nichigan-Northwestern ticket.
Another sheet appeared beneath
it the following day offering to
do "everything but pay."
And there the fun commenced.
Last reports before the game indi-
cated that the entire board and
part of the wall were buried be-
neath large sheets of paper offer-
ing fantastic prizes for the covet-
ed ticket-and the price someone
offered for one with an ID card is
out of this world!
Honestly
-A Typical Michigan Project-
It's Terrific! !
'49 NCN

Job Hunters
Can Register
With Bureau
Students looking for permanent
jobs in 1949 should attend the an-
nual registration meetings of the
University Bureau of Appoint-
ments at 4:10 p.m. tomorrow and
Tuesday in the Rackham Lecture
Hall.
Tomorrow's meeting will deal
with the problems of prospective
teachers. Dr. T. Luther Purdom,
director of the Bureau, will answer
questions about the requirements
for teaching positions and regis-
tration with the Bureau.
The University School of Edu-
cation requires that every student
be registered with the Bureau be-
fore a Teacher's Certificate will be
issued to him.
Students interested in General
or Business placement will meet l
at 4:10 p.m. Tuesday. Registration
for jobs in business, industry and
professions other than teaching
will take place at Tuesday's meet-
ing.
Tomorrow and Tuesday will be
the regular registration period for
February, June and August grad-
uates. However, job registration
service is open to anyone who has
attended the University, whether
or not he has obtained a degree.
Graduates or staffsmembers who
want full-time jobs within the
next year, or want better jobs, may
also register with the Bureau.
IZFA Speaker
To Talk on Europe
Oscar Cohen, director of the De-
troit Jewish Community Council,
will speak at IZFA's meeting at 8
p.m. Tuesday at the Hillel Foun-
dation.
Cohen has just returned from
a trip overseas and will speak on
"Anti-Semitism in Europe." A film
will be shown and refreshments
served.

NO COBRAS IN BEDROOM:
Student Speaker Pictures Modern India.

By JOHN NEUFELD
The little boy on the train out
of San Francisco would not take
the candy Manu Mehta offered
him because Mrs. Mehta looked
like a gypsy to him and gypsies are
known to feed little boys poison
and then eat them.
After a long three-way confer-
ence between the moppet, his
mother and Mrs. Mehta, the boy
was convinced that Mrs. Mehta
had come from India to study and
ijot to halm little children, but her
lollipop still found no takers.
** *
MRS. MEHTA, graduate stu-
dent in education who came here
after taking her master's degree in
sociology in India is trying to give
Americans a better impression of
what modern India is really like.
There are apparently still many
people in the United States who
think of India as a country over-
run by maharajahs and elephant
boys, a place where cobras feel at
home in your bedroom.
For the past year Mrs. Mehta
has visited most parts of Michi-
gan and spoken before many or-
ganizations,hmostlyrwomen's
clubs and church groups. The
arrangement for these talks is
made by the International Cen-

ter's Speaker's Bureau, which
brings a wide range of educa-
tional programs to the citizens
of the State of Michigan.
Mrs. Mehta feels that while men
are usually more interested in poli-
tics and economic conditions,
women want to know about social
life and ask her about the status
of women in India.
SHE HAS been asked especial-
ly many questions about the joint
family system of India, and
whether Indian women find it dif-
ficult to adjust themselves to a
household where a large family
group uses a common kitchen and
shares all expenses connected with
the house.
Mrs. Mehta acknowledges that
some women suffer hardships in
living in the same house with
all their relatives and in-laws,
but she explained that the joint

family system is breaking up
rapidly, especially in cities where
living space is hard to find.
Mrs. Mehta has much praise for
the International Center and its
efforts to bring American and for-
eign students together, but thinks
that too few Americans availing
themselves of the opportunity to
meet with foreign students and
learn about their way of life.
* * *
AFTER SHE finishes her edu-
cation here, Mrs. Mehta plans to
return to Bombay, India and carry
on her social and educational work
there. She will be occupied most-
ly with children, both at a juve-
nile court and at homes.
This semester Mrs. Mehta has
been elected president of the Hin-
dustan Association, which has
close to 90 members and welcomes
American as well as Indian stu-
dents.

ti

/..1 /
t

NEGRO ATTENDS FIRST CLASS AT UNIVERSITY OF OKLA-
HOMA-G. W. McLaurin, 54 year old Negro, watches from an
anteroom as Dr. Frank Balyeat instructs first class ever attended
by a Negro at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Oklahoma.
The Negro is taking five classes totaling 12 hours in his studies
for a doctorate in education. The University also has assigned
McLaurin a special desk in the library and a special room in the
student union building where he can eat meals.

New Exciting
Flawless Appearance
with

GRIDIRON
SPECIALS!
100%
Worsted Wool
GABARDI NES
and
SHARKSK INS

X',teh h9 fi...

with JIM BROWN

4, 't1

Television is rapidly getting
over its growing pains.
Perhaps this is most graphically
exemplified by the way in which
various technical production di-
ficulties are being solved.
FOR INSTANCE, one of the
major problems is the terrific

$4995

and upD

Junior Sizes:
9-15
J. H. Cousins
307 South State

rat Jlie j7-t- t3 MAGIC!
ABC ALPhABET BRAS
No figure is a "problem figure" when it's
properly fitted in Warner's Alphabet bras.
NYLON AND LACE STYLE.........$3.50
In every size . . . in every bust cup development . . . and ABC
Alphabet bra creates a lovelier figure for you because it fits
you four ways.
It fits your bust-cup development
it fits the size of your rib structure
it fits front-to-back body depth
it fits the width of your back
Come in and let our experts analyze your figure--be fitted
perfectly in Warner's ABC Alphabet bras.
Jke VAN BURENho
8 Nickels Arcade Phone 2-29 14

heat produced by the lights nec-
essary for telecasting.
For months technicians have
been searching for a way to
make soap suds on their sets.
At last someone has come up
with the idea of foaming a couple
of bottles of beer into the water
producing a very realistic effect.
* * *
A GLANCE at the statistics
shows what tremendous strides
video has taken in the last few
months. There are now 35 sta-
tions in regular operation and it
is estimated that there will be 120
by the end of next year.
The sale of television sets has
madeaterrificradvances also. A
year ago there were '70,000 re-
ceivers throughout the country,
while today there are 525,000.
The rapid development of video
in the commercial field is almost
assured because it offers some-
thing that no other advertising
medium can match-the ability
of listeners to see the product and
hear about it at the same time.
* *. *4
WITH THE INITAL telecast of
WXYZ-TV last Saturday, Ann
Arbor residents now have their
choice of either this new station
or WWJ-TV.
Again this year students in the
Speech Department's Radio Di-
vision will produce several video
shows in collaboration with WWJ-
TV.
ON THE AIR THIS WEEK
Today
Noon WHRV-Journal of the Air
featuring an interview with Bet-
ty Smith.
8 p.m. WWJ-Charlie McCarthy
Show with Don Ameche and
Marsha Hunt.
9 p.m. WJR-Electric Theatre
with Helen Hayes.
Monday
8 p.m. WJR-Inner Sanctum with
Mason Adams.
FRIGA'S GRATET
£NRTAN N

9 p.m. WWJ-The Telephone Hour
with Gladys Swartout.
9 p.m. WJR-Lux Radio Theatre.
Tuesday
8 p.m. WJR-Mystery Theatre.
8:30 p.m. WHRV-America's Town
Meeting discussing the question
"What should the U.N. do about
Palestine.
9:30 p.m. WWJ-Fibber McGee
and Molly.
Wednesday
9:30 p.m. WJR-Harvest of Stars
with James Melton.
10:30 p.m. WWJ-Curtain Time
with Harry Elders in "She
Doesn't Choose to Run."
Thursday
9 p.m. WJR-Suspense with Wil-J
liam Powell in "Give Me Lib-
erty."
10 p.m. WJR-Hallmark Play-
house with Rosalind Russell in
"Mrs. Parkington."
10:30 p.m.WWJ-Fred Waring.
Friday
8:30 p.m. WHRV-This Is Your
FBI.
9 p.m. WJR-Ford Theatre with
Lucille Ball in "Tom, Dick and
Harry."
9:30 p.m. WWJ-Red Skeleton.
Saturday
12 noon WJR-Theatre of Today.
2:45 p.m. WPAG-FM-Michigan
vs. Minnesota.
8 p.m. WHRV-Great Scenes from
Great Plays.
Did you know that freedom of
the press, freedom of speech, and
freedom from fear were violated
by law soon after the United
States Constitution was written?
The World Book Encyclopedia says
that the "Alien and Sedition"
laws, passed in 1798, made it a
crime to criticize the President
and Congress. The laws were
fought bitterly and were soon re-
pealed.

$150
plus fox

ModelsM
BY USING THE MAKE-UP BASE
SUITED TO YOUR SKIN TYPE
MODELS' LIQUID TECHNI-VEIL (formula
TV7) designed for the youthful and mature
skins that should never use a heavy founda-
tion. Gives a mat finish and imparts a poreless
skin-luscious complexion.
MODELS' CODA-CREME (formula CC62) a
medium weight fine textured covering for dry
or normal skin. Covers tiny skin blemishes
perfectly.
MODELS' SPECIAL CAKE (formula CM99)
for more complete coverage and long wear.
Conceals large pores and oily skin and elim-
inates the heavy mask-like appearance so evi-
dent with ordinary cake make-up.
MODELS' POWDER PLUS (formula PW22)
a unique secret process produces powder that
lies flat on the skin. Used alone is an ideal
and complete foundation for young or sensi-
tive skin-or as a finishing touch to the other
MODEL bases.
All contain Cholesterol-the very "heart" of
lanolin which makes them soothing and bene-
ficial to the skin.

I

""""" "

The RICHARD HUDNUT t*?Z
It's sensational . . this new comb with the keen
razor-edge that shapes, tapers, styles your hair . .-
so safely, so easily . ;. right in your own home!
TAPERETTE is a "must" before home permanents .. ;
because it tapers away split or dried ends of old
permanents! TAPERETTE is a "must" between home
permanents o; because it keeps hair well groomed
always! Use TAPERETTE for the children and the
man-of-the-house. They'll wonder how they ever did
without it. So will you !

I

I

;-11

On State Street at Head of N. University

I

J

:.::::..::.:r :.:.:::::.:..

K '__

Ornly

The Finest

Quality

" .
.
' t

At Prices

That Are

Fair

got14 NA

.f
r. t,.
. J''

VP'

dress

gabardine

A
//

GOLDEN

GIRL

The Richard HudnutTaperefte...
complete with blade, only
Extra blades 3 for 25#

1.00
plus tax

One, two, three! . . . golden harvest shades!
And a gold kid belt encircles you as the golden
girl of any hour! Whippet Gabardine that'sa
great for desk or date! . ,.. Three-tone.-..
golden-beige, toast, cocoa. Also mist-grey,
slate-grey, stone-grey. 9 to 17.

I

With every TAPERETTE ... a booklef
of directions from the famous Richard Htudnut Fifth Avenue Soloni

Naic1y I0od's "VERY PERSONALLY YOURS"
dress. It comes with a detachable collar
that's monogrammed with your initials free!
And because it has two collars it's
doubly serviceaible. R avon fai lle in elohanti

Also try-

s
yip A
; a s

t
'?

,t
ii a

- EEEEEU iLT E.,,E:

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan