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October 09, 1948 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1948

THE MICHIGAN DIY7

PACs TTmiF1

i

Maize andBlue Seeks I 7thGonsecutive

Triu'mph

r ';

Indians

Scalp

Braves,

2-0;

Take

Series

Lead

_

DeMoss, Szulborski Ready
To SparkBoilermaker Wm
Purdue Stars May Have To Upset Favored
Wolverines Without Halfback Norb Adams

i

Bearden Holds Boston to Five
Safeties for Second Tribe Win

Gene Bearden pitched a five-hit
shutout against the Braves to
give Cleveland a 2-1 edge in
World Series play.

Indian Sign

BOSTON AB
Holmes, rf ........4
Dark, ss ...........4
M. McCormick, if . .4
Elliott, 3b ........3
F. McCormick, lb . .3
Conatser, cf .......3
M asi, c ............3
Stanky, 2b ........3
Bickford, p ........0
Voiselle, p .........1
*Ryan . ............1
Barrett, p .........0

R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

H
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

+0
2
3
6
2
5
1
2
2
0
1
0
0
24

A,
0
2
0
1
1
0!
0
3
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7

(By The Associated Press)'
CLEVELAND-Cheered on by a
tumultuous home town crowd
packed into the huge Municipal
Stadium, southpaw Gene Bearden,
purple heart naval hero, pitched a
brilliant 2 to 0 victory over the
Boston Braves yesterday in the
third game of the 1948 World Se-
ries.
In sending the American League
champions out in front, two tri-
umphs to one, in the big play-off,
Bearden allowed only five hits
scattered over as many innings
and himself scored the deciding
run of the game after powering a
long double to right field in the
third inning.
* * *
THE SHUT-OUT was the sec-
ond pitched since the series
opened two days ago in Boston.
Johnpy Sain stopped the Indians,
1 to',0, in the starter-the spectac-
ular duel in which Bobby Feller
lost a two-hitter.
Despite the exhortations of
their delirious followers, the In-
dians themselves did little se-
rious clubbing against the three
Boston flingers they faced to-
day. Their total hit output was
only five, but they were fortu-
nate in bunching four of them
in their two scoring innings, the
third and fourth.
Vern Bickford, rookie right-
hander, gave up both Cleveland
runs before he was derricked in
favor of Bill Voiselle with the
bases loaded in the fourth. Vois-
elle and Red Barrett, who hurled
the final frame, allowed the Tribe
only one hit the rest of the way, a
harmless single by Larry Doby in
the seventh.
AN AMAZING feature of Bear-
den's great performance was the
fact that he was pitching his
third vital game in seven days.
Only last Saturday the tall south-
paw shut out Detroit here to keep
the Indians in the torrid Ameri-
can League finish, and on Mon-
day in Boston he beat the heart
out of the Red Sox in a sudden-
death play-off for the pennant.

Totals ........
*-Struck out
eighth.
CLEVELAND
Mitchell, if ......
Doby, cf......
Boudreau, ss.
Gordon, 2b .....
Keltner, 3b ......
Judnich, rf ..
Robinson, lb ...
Hegan, c .......
Bearden, p ......
Totals ........
Boston ..........
Cleveland .......

..29 0 5
for Voiselle

ein

AB
. .001
...3
...4
.. .3
. ..28
...000
...041

R R O A
0 0 2 0
0 0 3 4
1 0 O 4
0 0 1 0
0 1 14 0
0 1 5 0
1 2 0 6
2 521 16
000 000-0
100 4x-2

His control was so superb to-
day that he issued not a single
walk. He struck out four, and
toward the last the Braves were
so desperate for any kind of a
hit that they were bunting to
lead off an inning. That worked
no better than anything else.
Bearden, who was wounded in
the fighting in the Pacific and is
a well patched-up athlete, permit-
ted only four balls to be swatted
to his outfielders. He handled six
chances himself as the Boston
batters topped his down-breaking
curves into the turf.
LACK OF CONTROL led to
Bickford's downfall, just as it did
to that of his teammate, Warren
Spahn, in Thursday's game at
Boston. The rookie issued five
passes while he was in there, and
one of them led to Cleveland's
second run in the fourth inning.
For two frames the Indians
futilely swung at the young-
ster's slants, and it wasn't until
Bearden rocketed one off the
right field wall with one out in
the third that the crowd fiad
anything to cheer about.
Apparently rattled by the blow,
Bickford walked Dale Mitchell on
five pitches to bring up Doby,
Cleveland's fleet center fielder,
and then it happened.
* * *
DOBY SLAPPED a hard
grounder down to little Eddie
Stanky at second, and the latter
wheeled and snapped to Alvin
Dark, Braves' shortstop, for a
forceout. Dark, in his anxiety to
complete a double play, pegged
high over Frank McCormick's
noggin at first, and Bearden eas-
ily dug on around to score.
It was the third error for
Dark in the past two days, and
it was rough on his fellow
rookie Bickford. But the right-
hander averted the final blowoff
until the next inning.
He opened the fourth by serv-
ing his fifth walk to Ken Keltner.
Walt Judnich, Cleveland right
fielder, struck out, but big Ed Rob-
inson followed with a single to left
and catcher Jim Hegan jammed
a safety into center to send Kelt-
ner across. When Bearden fol-
lowed with a short shot into left
to fill the sacks, Bickford was re-
placed.
* * *3
VOISELLE, THE eccentric right-
hander who used to hurl for the
New York Giants, turned in a
commendable job of stopping the
riot. He retired the side without
another run as Mitchell and Doby
failed to hit beyond the infield. In
all, the man from Ninety-Six,
South Carolina, served to a dozen
Indian batters before he retired
for a pinch-hitter in the eighth,
and he gave up one small single.
All this relief pitching was
wasted, however, as Bearden
wove his magic spell over the
collection of athletes whom
Billy Southworth somehow
drove to a National League flag.
Something like four out of every
five for Bearden's pitches were
knucklers, which dipped and
wobbled across the plate, and it
was next to impossible to get the
wood on them squarely.
The only Brave to reach third
base was Stanky, the gamester
who recovered from a mid-season
ankle break just in time to com-
pete in the money series. Eddie
struck a clean single to right in
the third inning, and moved
around two pegs on a sacrifice and
an infield out. He remained right
there as Dark lined out hard to
left field.
Thanks to two double killings
behind him, Bearden left only
three Braves on base. In his three
nearly - perfect exhibitions in
seven days, the 28-year-old south-
paw distributed a total of one

earned run-to the Red Sox last
Monday-an examination of the
box scores disclosed tonight. That
is pitching!

Purple Meets
Mi nnesotans
Undefeated Elevens
Hit Hard by Injuries
(By The Associated Press)
EVANSTON, Ill., The Big Nine's
two strongest Rose Bowl contend-
ers, Northwestern and Minnesota,
match unbeaten records and bids
for the Conference title before a
capacity 47,000 football fans at
Dyche Stadium today.
Northwestern's Wildcats, boast-
ing a high-geared attack and a
forward wall which held UCLA
and Purdue scoreless, are rated
favorites over the Gophers, who
will be making their Conference
debut.
MINNESOTA, whose 214-pound
line appears its chief asset, blank-
ed Washington, 20-0, and last
Saturday finished pre-Conference
tuning with a 39-13 romp over
Nebraska.
Both clubs will be considerably
below full strength because of in-
juries and ailments.
Northwestern will be missing a
star end, Joe Zuravleff, who frac-
tured his left arm in practice
Wednesday. Other Wildcats who
may be sidelined are sophomore
Dick Flowers, a strong defensive
back, and fullback Gasper Perri-
cone. Flowers has an injured knee
and Perricone a battered nose.
* * *
MINNESOTA'S casualty list in-
cludes halfback Billy Bye, the
Gophers' best runner; fullback
Bill Elliott; right half Bud Haus-
ken; and left half Ev Faunce.
Bye, Elliott and Hausken have in-
juries and Faunce a severe cold.
The Wildcats have rolled up 454
yards by rushing in their 19-0 win
over UCLA and 21-0 romp over
Purdue. So effective has been the
running of Art Murakowski, who
has averaged six yards per try in
29 carries, Frank Aschenbrenner,
Ed Tunnicliff, Tom Worthington
and Johnny Miller, that North-
western has rested its passing at-
tack.
But the Wildcats have a dang-
erous flipper in quarterback Don
Burson, who has completed eight
of 17 tosses for 134 yards. If
Minnesota's line is as tough as
everybody thinks it is, Burson
may get a chance to really un-
limber his throwing arm tomor-
row.

(Continued from Page 1)

fensive and defensive team sys-
tem that has been so successful
in the past.
If the Wolverines receive the
kickoff, the line will be com-
posed of Dick Rifenburg and
Ed McNiell at the ends, Ralph
Kohl and Joe Soboleski at the
tackles, Dom Tomasi and Stu
Wilkins at the guards, and Bab
Erben at center.
In the backfield it will be Ort-
mann and Koceski at the halves,
Tom Peterson in the fullback slot,
and Pete Elliott calling signals.
* *I *
ON DEFENSE 'THE backfield
will remain pretty much the same
with the exception of Wally Ten-
inga who take over for Koceski,
and Dick Kempthorn who replaces
Peterson as line backer.
If this week's practice is any,
indication, Teninga, the hard
driving senior who has been
shifted to the tail-back slot, will
see plenty of offensive action as
a key to the Wolverine passing
attack.
In the line on defense Coach
Oosterbaan will throw in tackles
Al Wistert and Al Wahl and
guard Quentin Sickels to stop the
speedy Purdue backs.
* * *
TO COMPLETE WHAT is prob-
ably the best line backing combi-
nation in the country will be Dan
Dworsky who will see action
along-side Kempthorn as defen-
sive center.
It is believed that the key to
stopping the Boilermaker T--
formation offensive lies in stop-
ping the passes of DeMoss, one
of the best flingers in the busi-
ness. It was his aerials that ran
up 27 points against Notre
-Dame. Northwestern stopped
him with a hard-charging line
and a set of alert backs, and
went on to win going away.
The Wolverines will leave Chi-

PURDUE
Heck
O'Reilly (C)
Horvath
Sprang
Gibron
Barbolak
Sheer
Demoss
Gorgal
Adams
Szulborski

cago this morning and arrive at
Lafayette about noon.
A large number of Michigan
rooters are expected to be on hand
for the encounter.
Probable Line-up

Pos,
LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
RH
FB

OFFENSIVE BACKFIELD -
These are the backs who will
carry the ball for Michigan to-
day. Above, left to right, are
Leoa Koceski, wingback, and "
Tom Peterson, fullback. Below
are Chuck Ortmann, tailback,
and Pete Elliott, quarterback. ::..*...

MICH.
Rifenburg
Soboleski
Tomasi (C)
Dworsky
Wilkins
Kohl
McNeill
Elliott
Ortmann
Koceski
Peterson

Series Notes

A PERFECT COMBINATION -
A nice drive and a fine dinner
v Dine with teOrnisbys
"ON THE VILLAGE SQUARE" - DEXTER
Open until 7:30 P.M. Daily (Closed Sunday)
Recommended by Duncan Hines in
"Adventures in Good Eating"

PROBABLE LINE-UPS

MINN.
Grant
Nomellini
Fritz
Tonnemaker
Widseth
Carroll
Gagne
Malosky
Studevant
Warner
Beiersdorf

Pos.
LE
LI'
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
R H
FB

N.W.
Stonesifer
Sawle
F. Day
Sarkisian
Nemeth
Cernoch
Hagmann
Burson
Aschenbrenner
Tunnicliff
Murakowski

I;

'

CLEVELAND-(1P)-In addition
to displaying excellent pitching in
the World Series so far, the Cleve-
land Indians' moundsmen have
turned in some of the flashiest
fielding ever seen in any fall
classic.
In three games, Bob Feller, Bob
Lemon, and Gene Bearden have
accepted a total of 20 chances
without a bobble.
Lemon, a converted infielder,
leads in this department, han-
dling three putouts and six
assists in Thursday's game.
Feller had a putout and four
assists in the opener and yester-
day Bearden had six assists, in-
cluding the starting of a double
play that nicked a possible Braves'
rally in the fourth inning.
*. * *
One of the big reasons yester-
day's game took only one hour and
36 minutes was the fact that Bear-
den and the three Boston hurlers,
Vern Bickford, Bill Voiselle and
Charlie (Red) Barrett, threw a
total of only 181 pitches.
The Cleveland southpaw
threw only 84 times while the
Boston trio totaled 97 deliveries.
.* * *
The time for the game was 11
minutes shy of tying the series
record for shortest game by time.
The series' record for the short-
est game by time is 1:25, set by
the Chicago Cubs and the De-
troit Tigers in Detroit on Oc-
tober 14, 1908. The Cubs won the
game, 2-0.
Yesterday's appearance was

r

MSC To Face
Favored Irish
At South Berd
SOUTH BEND, Ind.-(AP)-Nb-
tre Dame is favored to extend its
defeatless football string to 21
games over three seasons against
Michigan State today at Notre
Dame Stadium in a renewal of a
rivalry which lapsed 27 years ago.
A capacity crowd of 57,000 will
watch the ambitious Spartons tac-
kle the rough assignment of try-
ing to hand the Irish their first
setback since Great Lakes did the
trick in the finale of the 1945 sea-
son.
In between 19 victories since
then, Notre Dame played Army to
a scoreless tie in 1946. This season
Notre Dame has beaten Purdue
and Pittsburgh.
The Irish and Spartans met 15
times previously, with Notre Dame
grabbing 13 decisions. Michigan
State won two, in 1910, 17-0, and
in 1918, 13-7. The last date in 1921
ended in a 48-0 Irish win.
Girl Friends"
at the
'op
r aid to the
ization
h. Air Camp
9A.M.-1 P.M.
lI Building
S why Craft Press
s

SPORTS
SEYMOUR SONKIN, Night Editor
Detroit Whips Frisco'
DETROIT -(W) - Scoring four
times on gallops of 26 yards orf
more, University of Detroit ground
out a convincing 40 to 7 football
victory over University of San1
Francisco here last night for its
third straight top heavy win be-
fore 16,123 fans.

I

11

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VCOI 1 AIR I\ITIrn TO qlZ[I

I I %,.UX/N1\ 1 1IN '

Y ' I LLV I 4./ LLt
the World Series

flraterni4c
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Aid-Morning
Rush!

Avoid

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' FIRST in PRINTING .. .
to FIRST in SERVICE .. .
1. FOR YEARS Craft Press has specialized in:
Dance Programs
Banquet Programs
2. CRAFT PRESS IS known for its complete

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at the DEN

No
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