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October 06, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-10-06

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Plat ant,

TIT E O MTCTI7 N DATT

TP13E?1 E', l 'Tt F 6, 1948

PAO~ SiX ~4........... ., 1.4

THETA'S SIBERIAN NIGHTS:

Cold, Phoneless, Gals Rough It

By MARY ANN GATLEY
Thirty-three coeds are "rough-
ing it" within two blocks of cam-
pus.
The Kappa Alpha Theta so-
rority house at 1414 Washtenaw
has been little more than a warm
Siberia for the past week-it has
33 women and not a single tele-
phone.
THE THETA HOUSE has still1
not recovered fully from the con-
struction work which forced its
occupants to live in the League
for the first two weeks of the se-j
mester.
They've been back home a
week but they are still living in
the midst of lumber, paint
brushes and general confusion.
Every morning all the women
are routed out of bed promptly at
7 a.m. to make way for the be-
mused workmen who swarm into
every room of the house. Privacy
has become a pleasant memory of
the far distant past.

x *

Daily-Heggem.-
THETA MIGRATION-Fresh from two weeks of quiet and luxury
in the League, members of Kappa Alpha Theta are pictured
moving back into their house, which has been undergoing repairs.
Confusion and isolation because of no phones have reigned
supreme for over a week as workmen (two of whom can be seen
through the open door) hurry to finish the painting.
the possibilities of enlisting car- isolation, the Theta's agree that
rier pigeons and smoke signals their two week's stay in the League
or the Sigma Alpha Epsilon tele- with its private rooms, room serv-
phones next door. ice and private phones was "sim-
Entering their second week of ply marvelous."

Peacetime Use of Atom
Neglected in Reseturch
NEW YORK---(/)-The atomic age, now in its f-uirthi yc-ar, so far
has delivered no important peacetime results to balanice the scales
against .its destructive bombs.
The major part of atomic progress still is centered on better
bombs and on still newer radioactive atomic weapons.
The only peacetime atomic products to date are radioactive atoms
and some huge new laboratories.
* * * *
, THE RADIOACTIVE atoms are hailed, as one of the world's
great accomplishments because they are important scientific tools.
But these tools have not had time to produce much. They are
beginning to speed chemical investigation, including medicine, agri-
culture and biology, but the speedL-uip is still oinly a minor part of
these great fields.
Some experiments have been done in cancer, with every
step so publicized that the gains sound large. But in no respect
have any radioactive atoms added a new principle to cancer
cures. They all do what radium has done.
Less publicized, but of greater importance, are plans to use the
atoms to try to solve the causes of malignant growths. But so far
the atoms are only an added starter among many tools already
searching the cancer field.
THE GREAT LABORATORIES are still in the beginning stages,
except the making of radioactive atoms at Oak Ridge, Tenn.
Power, the great dream of the atomic age, is still completely
lacking. In fact it is farther away from accomplishment in today's
predictions than it was three years ago.
The reason is international politics and fear of atomic war.
The legal secrecy, imposed because of these, makes it impossible
to know clearly ever how great the delay or how long it may
continue.
The first large postwar atomic furnace, or pile, is scheduled to
go into operation at Brookhaven1 National Laboratory, Long Island.
in December. When plans were first announced a year and a half
ago, they included some power at Brookhaven for research. The new
plant has enough heat for power, but the commnission has not
announced whether any power will be made.
S *
AT THE ATOMIC BOMB laboratories, Los Alamos, New Mexico,
there is a plant that has been called the watch charm power house
because it is so small compared with other atomic piles. It is small
because it uses almost pure bomb metal. It gives some heat, but
not enough for useful power.
If any major power problem has been solved in the United
States, the fact has not been reported. Commissioners have said
it may be 10 to 20 years to useful atomic power in the United
States.f
Scientists differ on the time, if power could be developed without
the present handicaps of secrecy. Five years is a common guess, but
it is seldom shorter.
Lack of money is not the serious drawback to atomic power,
Defense, by taking precedence, dominates the scientific and engi-
neering work.
UWF Will Hold Round -Table

THE
almost
women
phones.

TREAT's are proving an
unbelievsble fact - that
CAN exist without tele-

START AUTO SCHOOL:
Instruct Teachers in Driver Education

Daily-Bill Ohlinger.
DR. AMOS NEYHART, consultant on Road Training for the
AAA, looks on as Ralph Hartwig, Ortanville High School teacher,
tests his visual perception during one of the classes at the recent
driver education institute held in the Union. Inside the case are
two toy cars. Hartwig is looking through the top, towards a mirror
at the oth erend of the room in which he sees the reflection of
the cars. He then tries to bring the cars parallel to each other.
After taking this test, many of the teachers decided that they
would hesitate before trying to pass another car in the face of
traffic.
DUCAT DISPENSERS:
Cashiers Take Long Look
A1Movie - Going Patrons

By RAY COURAGE
The shoe was on the other foot
last week as 70 high school teach-
ers and police officers took up
pencil and paper to attend the
11th annual Institute for Instruc-
tion and Training in Driver Edu-
cation, held in the Union.
The institute was sponsored by
the Department of Public Instruc-
tion, the University School of Ed-
ucation and EXtension Service,
and the Automobile Club of Mich-
igan.
THE ATTENDING educators
came from schools and cities in
all parts of Michigan, on paid-ex-
pense scholarships made possible
to them by the Automobile Club
of Michigan.
Making a freshman schedule
look like a holiday, the driver
studentsw ere in class from 8
a m. until 9 p.m., with time out
only for meals.
While in class they received in-
struction in all phases of driver
training. Many of the teachers
were amazed when confronted
with results of tests which showed
them that their reaction time was
not as fast as they thought, or
that their depth perception was
not good.
These tests, with which all the
teachers became familiar, will be
used by them as part of their stu-
dent training course.
* * *
ALSO AVAILABLE to the high
school teachers when they return
to their schools, will be dual con-
trol automobiles, given to the Au-
tomobilesClub by two motor car
companies.
With a final objective of mak-
ing available to all high school
students a course in driver edu-
cation, the Automobile Club of
Michigan has been granting
scholarships to high school
teachers to attend these insti-
tutes.

With no immediate relief in
sight the coeds are pondering

FULL, RICH TONES:
Students of Literary College
To Organize Chorale Group

weary Coeds
Find Haven

{

Something new in choral organ-
izations will begin rehearsals to-
morrow afternoon.
Students in the Literary College
will get a chance to sing standard
choral repertoire in the Arts Chor-
ale, which will hold a brief or-
ganizational meeting at 5 p.m. to-
morrow in Rm. D, Haven Hall.
ORGANIZED to satisfy the de-
mand among these students for a
literary college choir meeting once
a week, the Chorale will eventually
present concerts.
Maynard Klein, associate pro-
fessor of choral music and di-
rector of the University choirs,
will conduct the Chorale.
Prof. Klein, who obtained his'
master's from the University, is

also director of choral music at
National Music Camp, Interlochen,
which is affiliated with the Uni-
versity.
* * *
DEAN HAYWORD Keniston of
the literary college, Dean Earl V.
Moore of the music school and
Dean of Students Erich A. Walter
have assisted Prof. Klein and Li-
Has Wagner, student chairman, in
carrying out plans-
At the first meeting, a defi-
nite time and place for regular
weekly rehearsals will be de-
cided upon in accordance with
the wishes of members.
Prof. Klein is planning to pre-
sent some of the great choral mas-
terpieces in the shorter forms:
motets, madrigals and part songs.

A t League
Weary women now have a place
to rest between classes or while
waiting for that coke date.
Beyond a door marked "pri-
vate" on the south end of the third
floor of the Women's League two
rooms are provided for sleep, rest
or just relaxation.
* * *
The rooms were used early this
fall for temporary coed housing.
Opened last year for the first
time by the League, the rooms'
facilities include four beds, sofas
and chairs.
"Last year the rooms were in
constant use, with one to four
girls in bed all the time," said
Mrs. Edith Wheeler, manager of
the League.
Made available for all campus
women from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.,
the room may be used with no
restrictions.

By ROMA LIPSKY
Movie goers may never look
twice at the lass enclosed in glass
who exchanges money for theatre
tickets, but these gals get a pretty
rood insight into the personalities
of their patrons.
The best mannered customers,
according to Donna Fountain,
pretty blonde cashier at the
State Theatre, are young chil-
dren. They are the most steady
customers. the most polite, and
.iake the cutest comments.
"ONE EVEN gave me a birth-
day present," she said, "but I
don't know how he knew it was
my birthday."
Donna agreed with Delores

Barth, brunette ticket seller at
the Michigan Theatre, that the
worst offenders are people who
don't have their money ready
and hold up the line.
Commenting on the student pa-
trons, Donna said they are "all
right when I'm in a good mood-
they're always wise-cracking, like
trying to pay sixteen cents for a
ticket."

Ili

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- - -

"Why World Government Now,"
a round-table, starts the semes-
ter's activities for the United
World Federalists tomorrow night
at 7:30 in the Union.
The round-table, first in a se-
ries scheduled for every other
Thursday, will be moderated by
Chester Byrns. A law student,
Byrns was formerly with George
Washington University.
r

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THE FOUR-MAN panel for the
first meeting includes Samuel Mo-
lod, history department fancult
member and author; and Pamela
Wrinch, political science student
and recent secretary of the Mid-
west Regional Conference of In-
ternational Relations Clubs.
Other members are Samuel
Dudley, former executive direc-
tor of the West Virginia State
Branch of the UWF and vice-
president of the local chapter. The
fourth member of the panel is un
announced.
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