100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 07, 1948 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FR~iDAY, r Y , r a4s

OM

I -

TUDENT PRODUCT:
eichigan Journalist' Serves
As Lab for Budding Writers

By DON McNEIL
A sparkling student newspaper
with professional makeup, which
sn't competing with The Daily,
appeared on campus this past(
week and will be published five
more times this semester.
The Michigan Journalist, begun
1 years ago as a laboratory ex-
eriment for budding journalists,
s brought out every spring by
itudents of the journalism de-

artment.
)ver 100 Participate
A four page affair,
s the result of news

the paper
gathering,

Exchange Talk
To Open With
George Allen,
The Hon. George V. Allen, As-
sistant Secretary of State for
Public Affairs, will speak at 11
a.m. Monday in the Rackham
Lecture Hall at the opening ses-
sion of the Conference on Foreign
Student Exchange.
a Mr. Allen, whose lecture here
will be open to the public, re-
ceived his present appointment
in. February of this year, when
he was named to head the Voice
of America, official propaganda
organ of the United States. He is
also head of the Department of
State's cultural program.
Reprelsenting the government
at the conference here May 10-
12, Mr. Alllen is a career officer
of the Foreign Service with a
wide variety of assignments
throughout the world. H'e has
served at posts in China, Greece,
and Egypt. He worked in the
State Department at Washington
until his appointment as' am-
bassador to Iran. He recently re-
tired from this post to take his
present job.
Mr. Allen is a founding mem-
ber of the Middle-East Institute
of Washington. A graduate of
Harvard University, he has
written many articles for various
magazines and journals.
Radio Program
To Feature Clinic
The Speech Clinic will be the
scene of this week's "On Campus
Doorsteps" program at 3:30 p.m.
today over WKAR.
Dr. Harlan Bloomer, director of
the clinic, and John N. Clancy,
admitting officer and clinician,
will discuss methods of speech
correction and the work accom-
pshed at the clinic.
All Broadcasting Service pro-
grams over WKAR formerly heard
at 2:30 p.m. will now be heard at
3:30 p.m., inasmuch as the East
Lansing station has remained on
Eastern Standard Time.

feature and editorial writing by
four classes, consisting of over
100 students.
Each year the students go'
through all the technical difficul-
ties of organizing a staff, getting
together writers, make-up men,
proof readers and headline writ-,
ers.
Cooperative Staff
A board of faculty editors, con-
s'isting of members of the depart-
ment, acts merely as an advisory
group.
"The board," says Prof. Wesley
H. Maurer, who heads the project,'!
"creates as many situations as
possible that develop students as
a cooperative member of a staff,
since cooperation and initiative
in assuming responsibility are so
large a part of successful journal-
ism."
By-Lines for All
Students develop their own
story ideas but receive approval
from their news source before
publication. Every article is by-
lined as a means of identifying
the individual writers.
Editorials are chosen from
among those writtenhby tworde-
partment classes in journalism.
Final editing is done at the Ann
Arbor News which publishes the
newspaper for the department.
Music Makers
May Audiftion
Student musicians may have
the opportunity to appear in. Car-
negie Hall by entering the third
annual Nationwide Auditions
sponsored by the Associated Con-
cert Bureau, Inc., New York.
Entries, which are due by June
1, are open to all United States
citizenswho are either artists
ready for a career or student mu-
sicians.
Local auditions are planned for
early next fall in Lansing and De-
troit in the ten contest categories.
Listed categories include bass,
baritone, tenor, contralto, and
coloratura, dramatic, lyric and
mezzo-sopranos.
State winners will appear next
winter in the National 'Music Fes-
tival at Carnegie Hall.
Bonnie Elms, '48SM, represent-
ed Michigan in the National
Music Festival at Carnegie Hall
last February. She was state
winner in the mezzo-soprano di-
vision.
Union Petitions
Petitions for Union vice-
presidents must be turned into
the student offices from 3 to 5
p.m. today. The petitions
should bear 200 signatures and
specify the school the peti-
tioner will represent.

Petitions for
Opera Council
Are Available
Applications Are IDue
At Union by May 14
Petitions for permanent posi-
tions on the Executive Council of
the 1948 Union Opera will be ac-
cepted from 2 to 5 p.m. May 10
through 14 at the student offices
of the Union, Dave Upton, chair-
man announced yesterday.
"With an excellent script al-
ready finished, and 40 good song-
writers hard at work on the
music, we are now ready to ap-
point the men who will supervise
the multitude of jobs vital to the
production of a successful show,"
he said.
The Opera needs men to be
production chairman, promotion
chairman and finance chairman.
Also needed are committee heads
for costumes and make-up, prop-
erties, settings, publicity and ad-
vertising, photography, rehear-
sals, personnel and all other ac-
tual production jobs.
A corresponding secretary, re-
cording secretary, and volunteers
for budget work, accounting and
requisition control are also
sought. All petitions should list
previous experience, school sta-
tus, availabilityhduring summer
school and all other pertinent in-
formation.
Leyshon emphasized that peti-
tions should be submitted in per-
son so that an appointment may
be made for interviews to be
held from May 17 through 20.1
Leyshon and Gene Sikowousky,
president of the Union will con-
duct the interviews.
Pinafore' Tickets
Are Still Available
Members of the Gilbert and
Sullivan Society are slowly recov-
ering their breath today from the
initial rush for tickets for "HMS
Pinafore" to be presented May 13,
14 and 15 in Pattengill Audito-
rium.
Pinafore tickets are being
sold daily from 9 to 12 and 1
to 5 p.m. in the booth outside
Rm. 2, University Hall.

By PHYLLIS KULICK
A plan for the proclamation of
a world federation directly
through the people and not
through the UN is snowballing
toward actuality with the calling
of a Peoples World Constituent
Assembly for 1950 in Geneva.
The movement began unassum-
ingly enough in England in Jan-
uary of 1946 when a group of
backbenchers from Parliament
led by Henry C. Usborne met to
consider the problems of the
peace. They refuted the two pre-
dominant trends of thought that
peace can be bought with dollars
or be enforced by power.
No Peace Without Law
IBeginning with the premise
that there can be no peace with-
out law, they reasoned that a

Direct World Federation Plan
Will BeDrafted by Assembly

Federalists officially endorsed the
plan.
Parliamentary groups in Great
Britain, France, Holland, Luxem-
berg, Italy and Belgium endorsed
world federation and stated their
readiness to back the movement.
Men like Earnest Bevin, Clement
Atlee, Paul Spaak, William Doug-
las, and Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr.,
climbed on the bandwagon.
Selecting Delegates
England is already setting up
electoral districts to select dele-
gates to the convention. On this
side of the international scene, a
meeting was called for the fall at
Princeton to create a plan for
electing delegates in the United
States.
As more and more political
leaders become convinced of the
need for World Federation the
dream of "peace in our time"
comes a little closer to realiza-
tion.

Students Cite
Social Needs
In Education
University curricula that train
technicians instead of citizens
came under fire from more than
600 students at the Michigan
Christian Student Convocation in
East Lansing.
The students agree in discus-
sion groups that the modern uni-
versity's stress on objectivity and
the scientific approach is produc-
ing social misfits. Efficiency in a
specialty is inadequate prepzra -
tion for the problems of conmmu-
nal life, they concluded.
Bishop R. S. Emrich, of the
Protestant Episcopal Church,
charged that modern universities
are "intellectual cafeterias," with
no overall policy for balanced
meals. He recommended an em-
phasis upon Christian concepts in
the universities since Christian-
ity "is a struggle for order in hu-
man affairs."

DOG ADOPTS CHICK--Laddie, German shepherd, looks at a
baby chick he has adopted in the home of J. W. Holley of Kansas
City, Mo. The dog allows the chick to walk on his back and head,
He whimpers when it is out of his sight.
MYSTERY FELINE:
Chem Profs Assume New
Functions as Kitten Keepers

By JO MISNER
Members of the chemistry de-
partment have viewed numerous
chemical and physical reactions
in the past without "losing their
equilibrium."
But a recent biological phe-
nomena which took place between
the new and old chemistry build-
ings has the department all agog.
This disconcerting event was
the discovery at 9 a.m. yesterday
of a tiny kitten in the combus-
tion room between the two build-
ings. An unnamed professor spied
the kitten through a hole in the
wall made by construction work-
ers who are now knocking down
parts of the walls for entrances
between the buildings.
Origin a Mystery
The parentage of the foundling
was clothed in mystery. The only
means of entrance to the combus-
tion room was a six-inch lead
pipe. No other traces of cats or

kittens were found in the build-'
ing.
The kitten's eyes are still closed,
and various authorities estimate
its age as somewhere between 2
and 5 days.
The orphan kitten has been
adopted temporarily by doting
professors and is making its
home in the main office of the
chem building.
Christened 'Benzene'
The kitten, dubbed "Benzene"
(C-6 for short), is living in luxury
on a white fur mitten-bed. Her
meals are administered through a
medicine dropper by top-notch
chemical authorities.
Though the chemistry profes-
sors are doing everything in their
power to make "Benzene" com-
fortable, they expressed a deep
concern over the kitten's future.
As a matter of fact, they will be
quite happy to turn "Benzene"
over to any layman who promises
to give the kitten a "good home."

world government is needed
which has the authority to make
and enforce laws applicable to in-
dividuals. There was less and less
prospect that the UN would take
an about face on its present pol-
icy of national sovereignty. But
they believed that the people
were ready and ahead of their
statesmen in the quest for world
government.
And so the plan for the people
themselves arising and proclaim-
ing a world federation was born.
It was proposed that a Peoples'
World Constitutent Assembly
meet in 1950 to draft the charter
of World Goveijnment.
Delegates to the convention
would be unofficially elected in as
many countries as possible on the
basis of one delegate per million
of population.
Ratification Procedures
Two possible procedures for
ratificationswere seen.d Fist, it
would be submitted to the UN for
approval. If this failed, the dele-
gates would have the democratic
right to submit the draft directly
to their national legislatures for
formal ratification.
Groups in the United States
were quick to follow up the pro-
posal. The Hutchins group in
Chicago drew up the first con-
crete draft of a World Govern-
ment. A World Republic group
was organized to back the plan.
One week ago the United World
a 001%

Our Spring Parade of "Proven Hits""
Today and Saturday!
Continuous from 1 :30 P.M.
George Sanders
wHO M Charles Coburn
Boris Karloff
} u U -'
s6
p~~to+

ROY Action!
ROGERS "THE GAY

Music!
RANCH ERO"

I I

Coming Sunday.

"GOOD NEWS" JUNE ALLYSON

ART CINEMA LEAGUE presents
7WBR/4Nj#T/M46/A/IVF//.M3
4'yone of/he few authen/ic geniuses of/the screenl"-CUE
"A MASTERPIECE1. Surpasses "Clearly fashioned by an artist
Rene Clair In the profound search with lyrical ideas!" --PM.
for truth! Michel Simon gives one "On a rare and unfamiliar level
of the "screen's greatest perform. a film art!" -S
-HOLLYWOOD QUARTERLY CUge
G~ateSIMON i
"Has a spirited sense of 11Witty, sensitive and compas.
gaiety!" -THEATRE ARTS sionatel" -PM
"A devastating satire!" "Has a curiously appealing
-NEWS (quality!" --TRIBUNE
., "Satirical, pagnant a nd "Ecstatlcvally lyrical I"
strangely fascinating1l".-CUE CINEMA (Mag.)
FRENCH
DIALOGUE Z m dTeoA nds
Both with Complete English Titles A Cine-Classics, Inc. Release

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

"Home of 3-Hour
Odorless Dry Cleaning"
, \1C LEAN E RS
Plant: 630 S. Ashley
Branch:. 619 Packard
Phone 4700

WANTED

v_ it

Newman Club

SPRING

3IV
ALL CAMPUS DANCE
MICHIGAN UNION

FORMAL
FRIDAY,
May 14th
$2.50 a couple

HAGANA urgently needs GI clothing!
Khakis, fatigues, O.D.'s, shirts, all
battle dress. Call 2-6585 for pickup.
)lb
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED: Ride, student couple to Bay
City May 8. Jos. Schultz, 9471 after
5:30. ) a
STUDENT COUPLE desire ride to Bay
City, Sat. 8th; share expenses. Call
Jos. Schultz, 9471 after 5:30 p.m. )2a
HELP WANTED
NEED MONEY? Sell Food Savers! Ex-
cellent commission. Send $1.00 for
sample and details. Money back
guarantee! Handy Pak Co., 3417
Maryland, Midland, Mich. )4b
WANTED TO RENT
AVIDLY interested in furnished apt.I
or house for two years - teachingI
fellow and wife (dean's secretary).
Univ. 334 - Mrs. Ecker. )23
VETERAN and wife need apartment,
starting next fall semester. Call 8470
and ask for Bill L. if you have the
impossible available. )9a
WHAT-Furnished Apt. WHEN--June.!
WHY-Wedding Bells. WHERE-.-Not
fussy. WHO-Bill Wyckoff, call 2-
3256 after 6. )6b
APARTMENT in Ann Arbor for summer
session only. No children or pets.
Will consider trading apt. in Cleve-
land suburb 10 miles west of square
for S.S. Excellent references. Harlan
L. Thomas, 19241 Shoreland Ave.,
Rocky River, Ohio. )3b
MICHIGAN1

Continuous Weekdays
Daily A
35c to 5 P.M.
from 1 P.M. T
Today and Saturday

POSITION WANTED
NEED HANDYMAN to repair, clean,
paint or maintain your home this
summer? Law student would like to
stay with family. Willing to work
for room, board. Phone Zalenski,
4145, 7-9 P.M. )71
FOR RENT
AVAILABLE now: Half of double for
male student. Pleasant location.
2-3762. )27
VACANCY for 10 men students, sum-
mer semester. For information call
2-0646. Ask for Mrs. Field before 5
p.m. )84
LARGE double room for summer and
fall semester for men. Call 2-3481 or
6938. ) ic
DOUBLE and single room for summer
one mile from campus. Burns Park
area- Box-99. )9b
PERSONAL
OUR FEATURE FOR MOTHER'S DAY
Nylon, 8 gore slip. Lace top and bot-
tom. White only, size 32, 38. $5.95.
Dries in 15 min.-no ironing neces-
sary.
RANDALL'S
306 South State Street
MOTHER'S Day Cards. Excellent selec-
tion of appropriate gifts. A Spring,
Jeweler, 221 S. 4th Ave., Ph. 4834.
)65
Tommy Coats-Rayon Jersey and Crepe
or Cotton Batiste and Seersucker.
SMARTEST HOSIERY SHOPPE
Michigan Theater Building. )7
SAVE SAVE SAVE
The 1948 MICHIGANENSIAN costs
$6.00 now. May 15 it will cost $6.50. )88
CAMPUS CORSAGE SERVICE
"A Student Service for Students"
Call Bill Barish
PHONE 2-7032
)18
SLICK AS A WHISTLE
Cottons.in fresh-as-a-daisy Fabrics
to keep you from wilting now and all
summer. Size 9-15. 10-44. $8.95-$22.95
THE ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP
309 So. State Street )2
10,% VIRGIN WOOL TOPPERS
with full lining. $25.95-$39.95 In
black, grey, red, green, white & yellow.
COUSINS ON STATE STREET ) 1
BUSINESS SERVICES
LAUNDRY-Washing and ironing done
in my home. Free pickup and deliv-
ery. Phone 25-7708. )43
ALTERATIONS-RESTYLING- Cust-
om clothes. Hildegarde Shop, 109 E.
Washington, Telephone 2-4669, )87
TYPING: Theses, term papers, ad-
dresses. Duplicating: notices, form
letters, programs. A2 Typing Serv-
ice, 208 Nickels Arcade, Ph. 9811. )28
TYPEWRITERS
Sold - Rented - Repaired
Free pickup and delivery.
Office Equipment Service
111 S. Fourth - Ph. 2-1213 )66

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Storm coat, South Ferry Field,
April 15, Reward, call 9371. )95
LOST: Dark brown tweed sportcoat
last Saturday night, Bear Mountain.
Please call Lackey 4145. Reward. )3c
LOST or STRAYED: 6 spiral notebooks
from Wikel's Monday afternoon,
Chem. and Math notes. Return im-
perative. Grad student. Reward. Call
5518. )91
GOLD TOP Parker "51" pen in Nat.
Sci. library, loose clip. Finder
PLEASE call Bob, 20022. Reward. )26
FOR SALE
ROYAL Standard typewriter, pica,
good condition. Phone 9014, 3-5 P.M.
only. )28
GOLF clubs, 8 Jones registered irons
good condition, $45. Call Paul O'Hara
N-42 Law Club, Phone-4145. )25
FRENCH Selmer Clarinet - Excellent
condition. Morton Ross - East Quad.
24591. )24
TWIN baby oarriage - Excellent con-
dition. Simmons studio couch. Phone
25-9365. )22
GOLF EQUIPT.: Spaulding, MacGregor,
Wilson. Ph. 4044 or 2-2058, J. Malloy.
FOR SALE: Trailer, completely furn-
ished, including piano. Parked for
permanent occupancy. Inquire at
gas station, 1880 Packard Road after
5 p.m. )7b
CUSHMAN Motorscooter, Side - Kar,
Windshield, two good tires, recently
overh pled, Box 94, Daily. )82
NEW Bolex H8 movie camera, never
used. Complete with F1.9 lens. Will
sell for considerably less than list
price of $330. If interested, write Daily
Box 98. )2b
GOLF CLUBS, 2, 5, 7, 9, and putter,
(3) woods with gloves, (5) balls new
and used, canvas bag. Phone 26432
after 5. )8a
MAN's White Shoes, 12A, worn 5 times,
$7.00; white net and satin formal,
size 12, $10; Red reversible raincoat,
size 12, $10; Man's all wool gabardine
grey suit, tailored by Saffel and Bush,
size 37 regular, $20; Sport coat, tan,
size 40, $6. Thomson, Phone 5745 af-
ter 5 o'clock. 7a
HOUSECOATS: Seersucker, sateeA, pi-
que, chintz and dotted swiss. Florals
and plain. Smartest Hosiery Shoppe.
Michigan Theatre Building. )7
YOUNG LOVEBIRDS, parakeets, cocke-
tiel, and canaries. Bird supplies and
cages. 562 South 7th. Ph. 5330. )19
WHIZZER for sale. Call 2-4591. 330
Prescott House before 10 a.m. )2c
CAMPUS SHOP SPECIALS THIS WEEK
All wool spring suits 1/3 off. 1/3 off
on all pigskin and leather gloves. All
colors and sizes.
305 South State Street
)11
COLUMBIA balloon tire bicycle, prac-
tically new; $31.03. Phone 22477. )99

__ __

THURS., FRI., SAT.-8:30 P.M.
Admission 50c (Tax Inc.)
Box Office Opens Wed. at 2 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATER

Phone 6300

I

C

..ter:

f-

-2

A

Todwt Erce

35c until 5 P.M.

STARTS
SUNDAY!

ALL ACADEM
WINNING P

CELRIMED!
"RICHLY

Y AWARD
ROGRAM
REGU LAR
PRICE'S

I

4

DESERVING
OF AWARD!"
_ -Weitschat, News
"His Performance
Proves Right
To 'OSCAR'" i
v .n.. . s'.o P*.. oe , I f a.

/'

ROBE0.T
cillivA
M TGREER
pNE
Bit

i '-

II

I

.I

11

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan