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May 05, 1948 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1948-05-05

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FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNl I1.)AY. A 5, Mil

'The House- I Live In'

HE' ;-IvUG x"youi-can't-1c gi;I ate-aga-,nst-
disrimnaion g ngwoke up yesterday
morning to find some of their rationaliza-
tions crumbling under what was called the
"greatest blow to discrimination in many
years."
At least, they must have noted' with no
small shock, discrimination has no more
place in court.
Making it quite obvious that in legal
opinion, skin color is not necessarily a
disintegrating influence on a community,
the Supreme Court unanimously forbade
court enforcement of real estate "restric--
tive" covenants.
The action irrefutably backs valid. but
heretofore comparatively ignored, claims
that minority groups as such have no more
to do with slum making than the slums
do with the few exceptionally good citizens
they produce. (Slums exist despite attempts
to better them by residents who have often
been forced into slums through "restrictive"
barriers to more pleasant surroundings; and
once in a while an individual can rise above
bad environment conditions with few scars.)
Proof of this, incidentally, is readily
Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
.re written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only.
NIGHT EDITOR: HAROLD JACKSON

available. In Washington, D.C., a city
noted for its few, but exceptionally bad
slums, the average tourist passing through
a large, pleasant middle class section of
the southern part of the city is more often
than not taken aback to discover it is en-
tirely Negro populated. (Oh, but it's so
CLEAN, is the usual unconscious and un-
believing squeal.)
Nor is this an exception. The trouble sim-
ply lies in the fact that Mr. Average sees
only what he wishes. The Supreme Court,
however, (excepting three members who
disqualified themselves from the case ap-
parently because they owned property cov-
ered by typical "gentlemen's agreements")
has taken a slightly broader view and show-
ed the way toward less segregation, and
more democracy with fewer slums a happy
corollary.
The move has also been hailed by minor-
ity leaders throughout the country as a
forceful reminder that the fourteenth
amendment hasn't outlived its usefulness-
recent action by Southern governors to the
contrary. (The southern state leaders re-
cently gave all out support to a measure
providing for the repeal of the fourteenth
amendment.)
In all events, the Court decision blocks
a very convenient out for so many home
owners and their "they can't live here"
protection. Sociologically, they're all wrong
as the Court, in effect, has loudly proclaim-
ed.
-Naomi Stern

For the Kids

FtRESH AIR and the opportunity to get
plenty of it is something that most of us
take pretty much for granted.
However, there are kids living in metro-
politan areas of Michigan who never get
the chance to breathe their full share of
the wonderful stuff-that is unless they're
ltcky enough to be one of the 240 able to
spend a few weeks at the University Fresh
Air Camp.
Many of the boys attending the camp
have developed adjustment and behavior
problems as a result of the crowded and
unhealthful environmental conditions they
are subjected to. Some of them are just
"regular guys" who need the four weeks
respite away from the stress of their city
lives so that they will not develop the psy-
chological difficulties that come so easily
to underprivileged youngsters.
Although in actual operation for only
eight summer weeks, the work of the Fresh
Air Camp goes on all through the year. The
social agency recommending the boy to the
camp continues treatment after his sum-
mer vacation. While in camp, the boy is
under constant though unobtrusive treat-
Annt by a staff fanmiliar with his problems
and well equipped to deal with them.
As far as the boys are concerned, it's just
one grand holiday away from city streets,
smoke, noise, hot days and humid, sleep-
less nights.
Johnny Camper spends his time swim-
ming, fishing, boating and batting out hom-
ers. If he hasn't got the know-how to join
in the activities, he is taught. In addition
there are over-night hikes, cook outs, camp-
Others Starve
ALTHOUGH 20,000 students, here, gripe
about the stew they're served on Mon-
day, the faces of 40 million hungry children
in Europe would like up at such a feast.
While some students drawn post-bluebook
blues in a chocolate super malt a kitten-
size saucer of milk is three days' allowance
for a child in Warsaw. While others nibble
at the center of a cheese sandwich, the
crust destined for the garbage pail might
make a meal for an abandoned waif in
Shanghai.
The urgent need of these millions of un-
dernourished (estimated world total 230 mil-
lion) is the motivating force behind the
vest international Children's Crusade being
carried out under the auspices of the United
Nations' Appeal for Children. This campaign
represents the united efforts of 26 interna-
tional relief agencies and thousands of vol-
unteer workers who are crusading to keep
the next generation from starving.
The local campaign is going on now.
Ann Arbor's campaign began last Satur-
day. Canvass of University personnel be-
gins today. A campus rally 'tentatively
scheduled for May 19 will give students
a chance to participate.
These crusaders against starvation are
doing more than putting warm food in
empty stomachs and warm smiles on
pinched faces. They and all who contribute
are making an investment in world futures.
The UN, peace in Palestine, Italian elec-
tions, and ERP are all important factors
in world conditions but they exist only and
solely for, the people. Without the people
they have no reason for being.
How these conditions are handled de-
pends in the last analysis on the opinions
and attitudes of the citizens who make up
the world. If you ever had to go to bed
without your supper, you probably felt
bitter about it, at least temporarily.
Consider the effect of going to bed every
night without your supper, of never hav-

fires, visits to nearby farms, talent shows, a
carnival, singing, storytelling, all in an at-
mosphere of warm friendliness.
And one of the best parts about it is that
'Johnny gets the chance to eat as much as
he can hold -- and often foods that are
scarce at home.
Sounds like fun doesn't it?
But it's more than that. A staff of doc-
tors, nurses, sociologists, psychologists, so-b
cial workers and psychiatrists keep a day
to day check on the mental and physical
condition of the boys. Special provision is
made for cases requiring it.
Students, alumni, faculty and friends of
the University have taken an active part in
maintaining the camp for 28 years now.
The project has captured the hearts as well
as the interest of Michigan students.
$5,000 is the goal set by students this year
for the annual Tag Day Drive for Fresh
Air Camp funds. And Tag Day is today.
Collectors will be stationed all over cam-
pus. We're sure if you remember the thrill
of discovering the wonders of summer in
the country when you were a kid, you won't
need any urging to add your bit to that
$5,000.
-Fredrica Winters
THEATRE
THE ACTORS of the Sociedad Hispanica
last night maintained their reputation
for excellent performance. r
Working with one of the greatest prob-
lem plays in the Spanish theatre, the entire
cast of Casona's "Nuestra Natacha" came
through with a realistic, moving presenta-
tion that got a fine response from a capacity
audience. So well did the performers act,
and so clear and accurate were their accents,
that it was a long time before one realized
with a start that this was an amateur group
contending with language as well as pro-
duction difficulties.
Diana Reynol, in the title role, handled
her difficult part with convincing warmth
and dignity. Carlos Soares, as the eternal
student Lalo, could give his role the superb
touch its broad humor needs if he were a
little less audience-conscious and if he
would leave off some of his declamatory ges-
tures. John Flconieri, as the student Riv-
era, has made a little gem of his part; while
Allegra Pasqualetti, though a trifle tense at
first, was a real and stern Senorita Crespo,
teacher at the reformatory in Madrid. Rich-
ard Defendini, in the role of the student
naturalist Mario, stole the show with his
description of the love-life of the red scor-
pion; and his third-act scene with pert
Marilyn Hass, who as his sweeatheart Flora
wakens him to the love life of homo sapiens,
brought down the house.
It is difficult to single out members of
the fine supporting cast; but especial men-
tion should be Made of Gerald Dykstra (Don
Santiago), Jack Steinhelper (Sandoval),
Gladys Middleton (Marquesa) and Thelma
Fife (Encarna). Elizabeth Iden, as Marga,
and Ellen Goldstitch, as Fina, made their
small parts memorable; look for them next
year. Particular plaudits go to Anthony M.
Pasquariello, teaching fellow in Spanish,
for a magnificent job of cutting and direct-
ing.
The play will be presented tonight for
the last time at the Lydia Mendelssohn The-
atre.
-Andee Seeger.
New Books at General Library

MATTEROFFACT:
Llolh andl Dagger'C
By STEW ART' AisI
IN THE comfortably distant Un id Stat e,
it is not easy to grasp the fierceness of
the contest between the Soviet Union and
the Western world. And for this very reason,
it is hard to imagine how very close we have
just come, and may probably come again, to
the slippery brink of catastrophe. Both these
points are illustrated by three curious re-
cent episodes here, which are regarded as
fully authenticated by the highest author-
ity.
The first may be described as "the mys-.
tery of the Russian furs." Recently the Sov-
iet Embassy in Rome approached the Italian
Ministry of Foreign Trade with a seeminly
innocuous request. Permission was asked,
and cheerfully granted, for shipment to
Rome of a load of Russian Iurs to adorn the
twenty-odd ladies of the Embassy stafi.
Subsequently, however, Foreign Trade Min-
ister Cesare Merzagora was astonished to
discover that the Soviets intended to im-
port Just short of a ton of furs. This would
have sufficed to cover all the Embassy lad-
ies in several thicknesses of sable, with
enough left over to ermine-line the Embassy
walls
To seasoned observers in Italy-especially
those with access to intelligence reports-
this was not especially mysterious. The ton
of furs was of course really intended for
sale on the black market, for foreign ex-
change with which to finance Soviet ,gents
and the Italian Communist party. T'_is sort
of thing was going on for a long time. The
fur fraud was only signfiicant because it
was so transparent, which suggests that the
Soviet foreign exchange famine must be
very acute indeed.
The second episode may be described as'
"the mystery of the black market:" Prior to
the election, near panic reigned in some cir-
cles here. Many of the rich prepared to flee
the country, and others actually fled. Nor-
mally, when the rich pack up to run away,
there is a tremendous boom in every foreign
currency. Instead, the dollar market re-
mained absolutely stable. Thsi was because
the demand of the rich for dollars to carry
away with them was more than met by- the
supply of dollars sent into Italy to finance
the Communist underground.
The third episode may be called "the
mystery of the disgruntled partisans." On
March 20 and 21, large groups of Com-
munist ex - partisans, "activists" and
"agitprops" started for the hills, especially
in Piedmont and in the arear around
Florence. Preparations for direct action
were obviously on foot. Yet the fighting
men of the underground had hardly
arrived at thei rassembly points when,
strangely, and despite the disgruntlement
of many of the younger hot-heads, they
began to trickle home. The orders' had
been changed. By March 24, almost all
were out of the hills again.
THE EXPLANATION of this odd, in-
again, out-again movement is only too
apparent. It is now hardly doubted that at
least two alternative, Kremlin-approved
plans for Italy had been drawn up, and that
one plan called for direct action either be-
fore, during oi immediatetly after therelec-
tion. Either the wrong orders were given,
and the wrong plan set in motion; or Plan B
was substituted for Plan A at the last mo-
ment. Thus the partisan movement to as-
sembly points began, only to be halted.
How this was done is also known. The
Kremlin's order to halt was almost certainly
transmitted through the Soviet Embassy, to
the Italian Communist leader, Palmiro Tog-
liatti, both before and after the elections.
According to an undoubted source, Togli-
atti often visited the Soviet Embassy on
several occasions, and remained through the
night at least twice.
Important lessons may be drawn from

these three episodes. In the first place,
however many millions of dollars the Sov-
iets used in the underground effort in
Italy, the sum was trivial compared to the
billions more publicly poured in by the
United States. Relatively speaking, the
sum was trivial compared to the billions
more publicly poured in by the United
States. Relatively speaking, the Soviets
get a lot more political return for a lot less
cash. But this is because misery and social
unrest give the Soviets their chance. Re-
move the causes, and the chance will be
removed also.
In the second place, the knowndexistence
of a Kremlin-approved plan for direct ac-
tion in Italy means that the Kremlin at least
for a while considered taking steps which
were almost certain to bring on a third
world war. That is the measure of the dan-
ger of the world situation. And there is no
reason to suppose that the election returns
here in Italy will greatly reduce the Krem-
lin's willingness to play with fire in this
manner.
(Copyright, 1948, New York Herald Tribune)

TIME OF EXERCISE

TIME OF EXAMINATION

li

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Monday
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Monday

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....Fri.,
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June
May
May
June
June
June
June
May
May
June
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SECOND SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
jNI-VE i Y OF M GHIHIGAN
GOLITE.RATiRKE SCIE'NCE. AND THE ARTS
tit: LGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
MAY 29-JUNE 10. 1948
Note: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the time
of exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week;
for courses having quizzes only, the time of the exercise is the
time of the first quiz. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule. 12 o'clock
classes, 4 o'clock classes, 5 o'clock classes, and other "irregular"
classes may use any examination period provided there is no
conflict (or one with conflicts if the conflicts are arranged for
by the "irregular" class). In the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts, instructors of "irregular" classes with 20 students
or less, most of whom are seniors (or graduating graduates),
may use the regular hours of the last week of classes for final
examinations if they wish. A final period on June 10 is available
for "irregular" classes which are unable to utilize an earlier
period.
All examinations of those expecting to receive a degree in
June must be completed not later than Saturday, June 5. It is
the responsibility of the instructor to arrange special examina-
tions, if necessary, for those students. In the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts, the times for special examinations
for those graduating in June for certain courses are indicated
below.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination. In the College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts, no date of examination may
be changed without the consent of the Committee on Examina-
tions. The graduating student should also check to see that
his examinations are to be completed by June 5.

9-12
9-12
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Tuesday
Tuesday
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Tuesday
Tuesday

at
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Letters to the Editor...

8.
9. ....
10......
11......

1...................
2...................
3...................

.......Fri., June
.......Thurs., June
........Sat., June

Evening Classes, Seminars, and
Chem 21 ......................
Irregular'.......................

.. Mon.,May 31,7p.m.
......Thurs., June 10, 9-12

SPECIAL PERIODS

Ec. 51, 52, 53, 54, 102 ....................
English 1, 2 ............................
Soc. 51, 54, 90 ..........................
Bot. 1, Zool. 1 ..........................
Chem. 1, 3, 4, Psych 31 ..................
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32, 61, 62,
91, 92; Speech 31, 32 ..................
German 1, 2, 31 ........................
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 .. .. .. .. ...........
Pol. Sci. 1, 2 ..........................

Thurs., June

3, 2- 5

Fri.,
Sat.,
Mon.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Tues.,
Wed.,
Wed.,

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

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The Daily accords its readers the
privilege of submitting letters for
publication in this column. Subject
to space limitations, the general pol-
icy is to publish in the order in which
they are received all letters bearing
the writer's signature and address.
Letters exceeding 300 words, repeti-
tious letters and letters of a defama-
tory characterorssuch letters which
for any other reason are not in good
taste will not be published. The
editors reserve the privilege of con-
densing letters.
Meet the Men
To the Editor:
IN VIEW of the fact that Miss
Parnes stated that she had met
"all the boys"; it would now seem
appropriate that she meet some
of the men.
-J. Deyo.
K. Thorp.
D. Thorp.
Editorial Praised
To the Editor:
A T SOME EARLY date I hope
you will find time and space
to reprint Mr. Don McNeil's edi-
torial of May 1, 1948 entitled "Lib-
eral Stand Explained." I
I thought it scored a bull's eye.
-Robert B. Wilcox.
Stassen 's Record
To the Editor:
BECAUSE I have heard sincere
people, aware of the hopeless
position of the Democrats, say.
that if Harold Stassen is not nom-
inated by the Republicans they
will vote for Wallace, I would like
to point out that Stassen cannot
in any way be considered an al-
ternative to Wallace.
When election time rolls around
every candidate likes to be con-
sidered a liberal. No serious can-
didate ever advertises himself as
a reactionary. But voters must
judge the man by the things he
does and the things he believes in,
not by the labels he pins on him-
self. Stassen is a leading con-
tender for the liberal mantle, but
let's look at the record:
Stassen is opposed to extending
Marshall Plan aid to nations
which are pursuing nationaliza-
tion-of-industry policies, includ-
ing England. (1) He is opposed to
the Wagner-Ellender-Taft Hous-
ing Bill and to public housing in
general. (2) He is opposed to fed-
eral compulsory health insurance.
(2) He is opposed to the Missouri
Valley Authority Plan. (3) He is
opposed to repeal of state and
federal oleo-margarine taxes. (1)
He is opposed to price control and
rationing, although he favors in-
stituting a system of wage-freez-
ing.
Stassen testified in favor of
the Taft-Hartley Act, wired Pres-
ident Truman urging him to sign
the bill, and claims to have in-
troduced its fore-runner while
governor of Minnesota. He is in
favor of an immediate draft of
men 19 to 25. He characterized
President Truman's veto of the
tax reduction bill "a shameless
deception" and advocates a ceil-
ing on upper bracket income
taxes. He is in favor of out-
lawing the Communist Party in
the United States.
There has been a deadly silence
emanating from Stassen on such
vital issues as racial discrimina-
tion, thereby avoiding taking a
stand on anti-poll tax, anti-lynch-
ing, and FEPC legislation. He has
said nothing of his position on
UMT. He has made no mention
of his views on extension of social
security; on federal aid to educa-
tion; on increase of the minimum
wage. He has kept silent about
his attitude toward world go'vern-
ment, in spite of a widespread
reputation for being internation-

ally-minded.
Stassen fought Wendell Willkie
in the 1944 Wisconsin primary,
thereby eliminating Willkie from
the race for the Republican pres-
idential nomination ...
Sources: (1) New Republic,
April 19, 1948. (2) Where I Stand
by Harold Stassen. (3) Life Mag-
azine, March 1, 1948.
-Max Dean, Chairman,
Wallace Progressives.
Criticizes Critics
To the Editor:
Don't ever let them go. They
are just too wonderful. Such con-
sistency ! They never fail me. I
never fail to consult them before
attending the theatre. I mean cf
course your movie critics. I read
and then do the direct opposite of
what they advise, this way I am
always sure of seeing good enter-
tainment.
-R. M. Kauffman

a great distance. If they must why
don't they be only partly unfair
and just ban Progressive candi-
dates from campus, instead of all
parties. Or why don't they gain
the respect of the student body
and allow all candidates to speak,
It must be quite clear to them
that their policy has met with
overwhelming disfavor of the
student body. If they don't do this
I hope the Student Legislature
forces them, or should I say, ad-
vises them to. Such a show of
power by the Student Legislature
would do student morale a lot of
good.
An eminent educator once
wrote an essay called "the Red
School House" which stated that
society's accusations that our col-
leges are "red" are untrue and
that colleges are "important
agencies in maintaining the stat-
us quo." His thesis is stated best
n his own words. "Youth is life's
period of experimentation. The
college should be an agency to
train persons to think and to seek
social efficiency and personal
mental enrichment, not to teach
them what to believe and what
not to believe." I think our stud-
ents who are opposed to this
speaking ban could use this au-
thor as a leader in tearing it
down. By the way, the author's
name is Alexander G.Ruthven.
John L. Boeing, West Quad.
* * *
Sports Coverage
To the Editor:
THOROUGHLY agree with the
letter of Mr. Henry S. Strauss.
concerning sports coverage. While
the Prince and the rest of the Ti-
gers undoubtedly are wonderful
players, I too am not impressed.
-Edward J. Hand
* * *
Russian Relations
To the Editor:
IN ITS international relations,
that is, its relations with Rus-
Aia the United States is danger-
ously near a precipice. If our
thinking and that of our leaders
congeal at the stage now reached,
war is inevitable!
Two signs of our dangerous pos-
ition are:
1) The American and British
statements concerning Russian
conciliatory moves in the writing
of the Austrias treaty. The moves
are interpreted by our negotia-
tors not as a desire for agreement
on the part of Russia but, as a
"typical Russian" attempt to cury
Austrian public opinion.
2) Arthur Knock in the New
York Times, April 16th refers to
Secretary General Lee's state-
ment pleading for peace and for
agreement between the big five as
partisanship in favor of the Soviet
Union. Thus, if a person doesn't
join our side in the battle for ex-
tension of national power now
raging between the two great na-
tion-states, he is looked upon as
an enemy.
Clearly, our real power is that
we have reached a point where it
isbad to come to agreement and
good only to "stand up" to our
adversary. If this should crystal-
lize permanently in our thinking
we are lost, for agreement is ne-
cessary to prevent war.
-Roger Shaw

~1

A

SPECIAL PERIODS FOR THOSE GRADUATING IN JUNE
Botany 1; Zoology 1; Psych 31...........Sat., May 29, 7 p.m.
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32, 61, 62, 91, 92
Germane1, 2, 31
Spanish 3., 2, 31, 32 .................. Tues., June 1, 7p.m.
Speech 31, 32 ......................... Wed., June 2, 7 p.m.
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-,
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board. '
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual Instruction in Applied Music.
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for
all applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for
credit in any unit of the University. For time and place of exam-
inations, see bulletin board of the School of Music.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any neces-
sary changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
MAY 29 TO JUNE 10, 1948
NOTE: For courses having both lecture and quizzes, the
time of exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the
week; for courses having quizzes only, the time of exercise is
the time of the first quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through
the examination period in amount equal to that normally de-
voted to such work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as .noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between as-
signed examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3036 East Engineering Build-
ing between May 12 and May 19 for instructions.
Seniors and graduates who expect to receive a degree.this
June and whose examination occurs after June 5, should also
report to Room 3036 E.E. between May 12 and May 19.
To avoid misunderstandings and errors each student should
receive notification of the time and place of his appearance in
each course during the period May 29 to June 10.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee.

C
r
i
E
i

Fifty-Eighth Year

Loo king Back'

From the pages of The Daily :
30 YEARS AGO TODAY:
Douglas Fairbanks thrilled Ann Arbor
screen audiences in "American Aristocracy"
which a local theatre advertised as "A Spon-

TIME OF:
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