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May 01, 1948 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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'THROUGH TIDE SIDE DOOR':
Festival Program Recalls
Rachmaninoff Concerts Here-

By JOHN MORRIS
The all-Rachmaninoff concert,
fifth and most popular in the May
Festival " Series, recalls another
Festival and another Rachmanin-
off program, back in 1942.
But it was the lean Russian pi-
anist himself that was featured,
playing his own Second Piano
Ex-Daily Editor
Gets AP Post
Stan Swinton, former Daily city
editor, 1939-40, and son of Prof.
and Mrs. Roy S. Swinton recently
was appointed acting chief of the
Associated Press Singapore bu-
reau.
He served with the army four
years, spending much of the time
with "Stars and Stripes" and has
been writing out of Singapore for
the past two years.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
-Last Times Today -

Concert, in the last of a 22-year
series of concerts that made him
something of a legend on campus.
Visit To Campus
At the Union they tell one story
about his last visit to campus. He
and Mrs. Rachmaninoff, together
with a group of friends, attempted
to enter the front door of the Un-
ion. But George, the old Union
doorman stopped them.
"I'm sorry," he said to Mrs.
Rachmaninoff, "but you'll have to
come in through the side door."
And the world-famous composer
took his wife around to the side
door without a murmur of com-
plaint.
At his first concert here, Nov.
11, 1920, his reputation had pre-
ceded him. A front-page Daily
story was headlined "Rachmanin-
off Thrills Audience" and lauded
his performance of Beethoven's
Sonata in E minor.
Artistic Planing
It was his "truly artistic play-
ing, wonderful interpretations and
unique personality" that moved
the Ann Arbor audience to de-
mand, encore after encore. Rach-
maninoff finally consented to play
his Prelude'-
In Rachmanipoff's memory, the
fifth concert of the May Festi-
val at 2:30 p.m. tomorrow will per-
form "The Bells," a choral adap-
tation of Poe's poem, and the Sec-
ond Piano Concerto, with Leon
Fleisher repeating Rachmanin-
off's performance of the same
piece six years ago.
Mrs. Sergei Rachmaninoff has
been specially invited to attend
this performance of her husband's
works.
'U' Press Goes
Into 90th Year
Ninety years ago the University
entered the publishing field and
began the series of academic lit-
erary activities that culminated in
the creation of the University
Press.
The history of the Press had its
beginning in the publication of a
volume on astronomy entitled
"The Tables of Victoria," by Prof.
Franz Brunnow, which appeared
in 1858.
This initial University publica-
tion has been followed by hun-
dreds of other volumes. At present
there are more than 275 titles in
print bearing the University Press
label.
Material is broadly classified in-
to two groups by the Press : (1)
,official 1lublioations, and (2)
scholarly publications.
One of the conditions governing
publication of a scholarly manu-
script provides forra reading by a
committee of experts in one of six
fields of learning-physical sci-
ences, biological sciences, lan-
guages and literature, health sci-
ences, social sciences and fine arts.

Model Women
Police Force
Teaches Nat ion,
Lady Cops Believed
'Practical. in .Detroit
By JO MISNER
Coed cops may sound like a
Utopian proposition to some.
But the city of Detroit finds its
76-member policewomen group-i
which will include two University
graduates this June-not only:
pleasing but practical.
The Detroit policewoman or-
ganization is considered by many
a "model division." It is often used
as a training school for persons
who are organizing'similar groups
in large cities throughout the
United States and foreign coun-
tries. A professor of criminology
at Istanbul University came to De-
troit recently to study the set-up
there.
The work of the policewomen is
many-sided. They become authen-
tic "pistol - packing mammas"
when they go out in pairs to pa-
trol public places where young
people congregate. They also in-
vestigate non-criminal complaints
involving delinquency or neglect,
missing persons and runaways.
The policewomen do bona fida
sleuthing in criminal complaints
involving sex crimes of any nature
against girls under 17 or boys un-
der 10.
Their work assumes a legal na-
ture as well, since they assist the
prosecuting attorney in trying
such cases. They organize and in-
vestigate all the facts in these
cases for the prosecuting attor-
ney's use.
Policewomen do "short term"
case work in emergencies and in
cases requiring law enforcement
and refer individuals to casework
agencies for extended treatment
when necessary.
The Detroit police force finds
there is only one drawback to
their feminine division. Evidently
their training enables policewo-
men to "get their man" too well.

YOUTHFUL CONSTRUCTION GANG-Underprivileged children
keep healthy and learn useful play in the University Sponsored
Fresh Air Camp. Tag Day for the benefit of the Camp will be
held on campus Wednesday.
* * 4
CHANNELED PLAY:
Fresh Air CampStaff Helps
Boys Readjust to Better Life

Willow Tots
Exhibit Nursey
Art Creaiol,s
The little people's big art ex-
hibit.
That's what you might call the
exhibit which the toddlers of the
Willow Village Cooperative Nur-
sery are featuring from 3 to 4:30
p.m. tomorrow for their parents
and friends.
These versatile artists will dis-
play works in crayon drawing.
brush painting, and finger paint-
ing which they have created as
part of their nursery cmriculum.
Each child will have at least one
work posted and the more pro-
lific will show several.
Most inipotant, however, ihe
artList's staiemrent about his ci. ii
:it, re .ill be attached co eair
work of art - just to avoid any
confusion. An example of the ab-
stract school has appeared already
in the form of a painting which is
solid black. When asked what it
represented, the artist responded
"That's down in the basement
with the lights off."
Children who have produced
several drawings will have them
arranged in development sequence.
Those who attend the exhibit can
discuss art over tea which will be
served on the occasion.
Campus
Calendar
AVC Picnic: Buses will leave for
the Fresh Air Camp at 4:15 p.m.
from the side door of Hill Audi-
torium. Tickets may be purchased
before boarding the bus.
Wallace Progressives: Meeting,
Willow-Run branch, 4 p.m., to-
morrow, Simonds School.
Radio: Michigan Journal of the
Air, 5:15 p.m. WHRV; Michigan
Profiles, 9 p.m. WHRV (Daylight
Saving Time).

Soprano Mac Walters Sees
Future for American Music

By LILIAS WAGNER
American music has not yet be-
gun to produce what it is capable
of, according to Virginia Mac-
Watters, attractive young Ameri-
can soprano who sang last night
in the second May Festival con-
cert.
One reason for this may be that
the world is going through a pe-
riod of change, she said. "Some-
times this brings about great
works," Miss MacWatters contin-
ued. "All changes in history h d
some favorable outcome, musically
speaking."
Young Composers
"Contests are opening the field
for young composers," she ob-
served, "and music is being
brought to more people through
tours reaching even small towns
where there has been no music
before."
An aspiring musician herself
not many years ago, she advised
young musicians to get as much
experience as possible. "It means
a lot to attend concerts, too," she
said. "That way you learn what
not to do as well as whatsto do."
Miss MacWatters, wiho spent
some time in England recently,
said that American artists should

By ALLEGRA PASQUALETTI
To the 240 boys who attend the
Fresh Air Camp every summer
camping means more than four
weeks of fun outdoors, it is often
the beginning of a new life for
them as they learn to make better
social adjustments.
They go to camp to have fun-
and do-unaware that student
counselors and trained sociologists
and psychologists are observing
them and channeling their play
to fit individual problems.
Sample Case
For example: here is the case
of an eight year old who will be
referied to as Bob Smith.
One of the things Bob needed
Frederick Salim, '49 Lit., ofI
Flint, was acclaimed winner of
the final Speech 31 competition,
held Thursday afternoon.
Second place was taken by Dale
Reynolds, '49 Lit., of Omaha, Neb.,
and third by Peter Kleinpell, '50
Lit. student from Flushing.

most was to be able to get along
with other children. With his
counselor's help he learned to
swim and row and as he became
proficient in these skills he be-
came more a part of his cabin
group. By the end of the camp-
ing period he was joining in group
activities.
Future Treatment
His counselor's recommenda-
tions as to future treatment for
Bob included the companionship
of an adult who would make him
feel important, and routine work
to keep him busy. These recom-
mendations were made to the
agency which sent him to camp
and used as a basis for follow-up
treatment in a continuing pro-
gram.
iBob's case was fairly simple.
Others range from boys who just
need a good time to delinquents
and others with serious adjust-
ment problems. Students and
townspeople will have the oppor-
tunity to "help send the kids to
camp" by buying a tag during the
drive Wednesday.

I

Starts Sunday

From a
15c Cheese Sandwich
To a
$1.35 T-Bone Steak
A Price For
Every Pocketbook
D )Q*N tA
328 EAST LIBERTY
NEW STORE HOURS
Open 5 P.M. to 1 A.M.
Every Day

Id

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

5 P.M. to
Friday and

4 A.M.
Saturday

r

FOR SALE
UNDERWOOD Portable. $25. Write
Sims, 1329 South Univ. )63
PHONE 4422
CorsageService )14
TUXEDO and White Dinner Jacket,
Size 39. Ph. 2-4936, Gene Parrot. )49
GOLF EQUIPT.: Spaulding, MacGregor,
Wilson. Ph. 4044 or 2-2058, J. Malloy.
1941 FORD sedan coupe, new tires, low
mileage. Call 8123 evenings, 6-8. )87
CORSAGE SERVICE
PHONE 4422 )11
TYPEWRITER-Standard Underwood.
Good condition. $55.00. Contact Ca-

pocchi. 615 Monroe, Tel. 9191.

) 54

.~.

LA SOCIEDAD HISPANICA
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
... Presents ...
NUESTRA NATACHA
A Play of Keen, Psychological Understanding
and Tender Human Sympathy!
... By ALEJANDRO CASONA
Spain's Ontstanding Contewporary Dramatist
TUES., MAY 4-WED., MAY 5
Curtain at 8:30 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Box Office Open 2:00 p.m. Monday, May 3 Telephone 6300
ALL SEATS RESERVED .........75c and 60c (tax included)

THE CORRECT NUMBER
PHONE 4422
Corsage Service )13
REMEMBER THE NUMBER
PHONE 4422
Corsage Service )12
GOOD as new Wilcox-Gay Recordio Jr.
Radio-Phonograph -Recorder, semi-
portable. Don Hartman, Ph. 4187. )44
BRAND NEW Man's Bicycle. Substan-
tial reduction. See H. H. Richards.
Jr., 1331 Washtenaw, Phone 7595. )41

WANTED
GOOD Used Camera Wanted. Can pay
$20-$35. Phone Phil Bedein, 7234. )50
USED TYPEWRITER-If you have one,
write Bog 92, Daily. )46
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Parker 51. Blue witlh4ilver cap.
Reward. Call Van Beek, 2-4200. )34
LOST-Grey Parker "51," name en-
graved. Call James Lynch, 2-2004. )43
LOST-Brown, spiral Psych. Notebook
Monday. Call 2-4401, 425 Adams. )52
LOST--Slide Rule with name "Yagni-
szczak" on rule and case. $5 reward.
Call Yag at 5660.
LOST-Harvel Watch, brown leather
strap, near south part of campus.
Reward. Ph. 2-4129 )48
LOST-RING, infront of residence at
613 South Fifth Avenue. Gold ring
with fraternity crest set on blue
stone. Sentimentalvalue. Reward.
Phone 4843. )39
BUSINESS SERVICES
WANTED sewing, dressmaking, altera-
tions, or repairs. Miss Livingston. 315
S. Division. )57
LAUNDRY-Washing and ironing done
in my home. Free pickup and deliv-
ery. Phone 25-7708. )43
ALTERATIONS-RtSTYLING- Cust-
om clothes. Hildegarde Shop, 109 E.
Washington, Telephone 2-4669. )87
TYPING: Theses, term papers, ad-
dresses. Duplicating: notices, form
letters, programs. A2 Typing Serv-
ice, 208 Nickels Arcade, Ph. 9811. )28
COMPLETE SERVICE on your furs.
Cold storage, individualized cleaning,
glazing, insurance, restyling and re-
pairing. Ginsburg Furs, 607 E. Lib-
erty, Michigan Theater Bldg. )15

TRANSPORTATION
TO CALIFORNIA-May 28- Two pas-
sengers, to share expenses, help drive.
Ph. 5539.
WANTED TO RENT
FURNISHED apt.- desired for summer
termIby responsible married instruc-
tor. Write Box 91, Michigan Daily.)76
STUDENT veteran and wife need
apartment, furnished or unfurnished,
in June or September. Two-year oc-
cupancy. Call Al in evening. 2"-569.
)23
VETERAN student and wife need
apartment on or about Aug. 20. Ph.
2-4401. Rm. 512 Win. House. Ask for
Al. ) 28
GRADUATE STUDENT and wife NEED
3 or 4 room furnished or unfur-
nished apartment. Immediately or
by June. Two years occupancy. Call
University 2421. )58
PERSONAL
COUSINS ON STATE STREET
White Dresses in pique, madras
or sharkskin, $10.95 to $21.95 )1
MOTHER'S Day Cards. Excellent selec-
tion of appropriate gifts. A Spring,
Jeweler, 221 S. 4th Ave., Ph. 4834.
) 65
COUSINS ON STATE STREET
FOLDING UMBRELLAS
for your Mom on Mother's Day $10.50
Other Umbrellas $4.95 to, $7.95 )3
ANYONE wishing to trade two IFC
Ball Tickets for new Buick Convert-
ible call 2-4431. Hurry! I'm desperate.
Mabel Sorority says I must take her
to the Ball. )59
ATTENTION FRATERNITY MEN
Having a formal?
Need flower; at cwest prices?
We have the answer to your problem?
CAMPUS CORSAGE SERVICE
Cail Bill Barish. 2-7032 )99
SANFORIZED Peasant Blouses by
SHIP and SHORE. White with eye-
let trim. Sizes 32 to 38, $2.95. THE
BUDGET SHOP, 611 East Liberty
Street. )36
STRETCH YOUR BUDGET
to include several dresses at these
bargain prices, $7 - $10 - $14.95
Among these prints, sheers, crepes and
gabardines, you'll find values to $22.95
THE ELIZABETH DILLON SHOP
309 South State Street 12

HELP WANTED
THE UNIVERSITY BROADCASTING
SERVICE will add two control engi-
neers to its staff around June 15.
Applicants mcst be qualified to han-
(Ile the remote pickup, cut transcrij-
tions, and should have some knowl-
edge of music. Also, should be able
to work 20-30 hours a week. Inquire
Personnel Office, 208 University Hall.
)51
FOR RENT
ROOMS for Graduate or business wo-
men for summer term. Call 4410 or
2-6468. )47
ROOMS-Available near campus for
male students. Si~mmer terms of 8
weeks, fall term. 927 S. Forest Ave.
)37
ONE BLOCK from campus. One single
and several double rooms for boys.
Summer and fail. 412 Camden Ct.,
Ph. 2-4756. )90
VACANCY for 10 men students, sum-
mer and fall semesters. For infor-
mation call 2-0646. Ask for Mrs.
Field before 5 p.m. )84
th.

1_'

FOR SALE
CLOSE-IN 35 Acres with 650 fruit trees. New house, 3 rooms
and bath. New deep well, pressure water system, water soften-
er, electric water heater. Also unfinished cinder block home
24 by 36 Barn. Fruit storage. $12,000.00, including orchard
equipment.
BEAUTIFUL, high, secluded 13 acres. About half woods, car-
peted with wildflowers, Stream. One mile northwest city lim-
its near Newport Road. Bargain at $6,000.00.
ATTRACTIVE 5-Room brick bungalow. Within sight of new
Northside school. Built under owner's supervision. Prewar
materials. Fireplace. Quarter sawed oak floors. Steel windows,
marble sills: Living room carpet included. Stairway to un-
finished 2nd floor, Gas heat. Full basement. Garage. Nicely
landscaped lot 49 by 150. Shown by appointment. $15,500.
ORIL FERGUSON, REALTOR
928 Forest, Phone 22839

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CORSAGES
Corsage Service
PHONE 4422

)10

MEN'S English type Bike, 6 months
old. 3 speeds, like new, $45. Phone
Lee Bartholomew, 2-3189. )33
GOLF CLUBS, complete set, (8) Hagen
irons, (4) Sarazen woods, used, in
good condition. Phone 5559. )60
MAN'S fully equipped 3-speed English
bicycle. $75. Tarbell 820 E. Wash-
ington-5989 )56
TAPE RECORDER-Brush soundmirror,
good condition, with Rose Bowl Re-
cordings. Ph. 2-4401, 202 Michigan
House. )62
ONE SET of Bobby Jones registered
men's irons, set of Lawson Little
woods. Hagen putter and one golf
pack bag. Call 5622 after 6 p.m. )61
IT'S top down time again. '41 Ford
convertible. 6,000 miles on engine.
Radio, heater, good tires and top.
$1100. Ph. 2-6750. )32
We have a lovely selection of summer
cottons in junior and regular sizes.
$10.95 and up. We have just receiv-
ed a new shipment of cashme: es.
CAMPUS SHOP
305 South State Street )98
E. ANN ARBOR-Modern 4 room house
and bath. Full basement. Landscaped.
Convenient to school, business dis-
trict. Phone 25-8582. )64
HOUSECOATS: Seersucker, sateen, pi-
que, chintz and dotted swiss. Florals
and plain. Smartest Hosiery Shoppe.
Michigan Theatre Bcilding. )7
YOUNG LOVEBIRDS, parakeets, cocke-
tiel, and canaries. Bird supplies and
cages. 562 South 7th. Ph. 5330. )19

IJFE A OWLOF C#iERli
bec
yI

tiES

:ause she's

going to

[FC BALL

Friday,

May

7

TYPEWRITERS
Sold - Rented - Repaired
Free pickup and delivery.
Office Equipment Service
111 S. Fourth - Ph. 2-1213

)66

SADDLE HORSES for hire. Student
rates, week days, $1.50 per hour. Al-
so horses boarded. Stable %' mile
south of Ypsi airport, corner of U.S.
23 and U.S. 112. Phone A. W. Co-
wan, 2-2266 or 871W11 Ypsi )2!

I8i

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MICIG~AN

35c until 5 P.M.

CHOSEN AS
MOVIE OF THE WEEK
by LIFE MAGAZINE

!. ARTHUR RANK presents

starri
DAYD FARRAR " GLYHIS 1WiNS

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