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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 29, 1948 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

XU' _RSIq-IV, 'PRTL 2,i4:

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FUN FOR THE KIDDIES:
Fresh Air Camp Aides Needy Children

By ALLEGRA PASQUALETTI
The Fresh Air Camp has come
a long way since the day 28 years
ago when a group of University
students packed up four tents and
some fishing tackle and set out to
show a few "poor" kids a good
time.
Today, with the guidance of a
skilled staff, 240 boys from met-
ropolitan areas cram all the fun
possible into their four weeks stay
and without realizing it learn to
make better social adjustments
at the same time.
Acquire Camp in 1935
The camp, which is situated 24
miles northwest of Ann Arbor on
Patterson Lake, was taken over
by the University in 1935. Its ob-
jectives were expanded to include
remedial and information serv-
ices.

When it was recognized that
the camp offered an opportunity
for students to study human be-
havior as a supplement to text
book work the camp was made a
subsidiary of the Institute for Hu-
man Adjustment in 1946.
Academic Credit
Qualified students may act asI
counselors each summer, earning;
six hours of academic credit.,
Their work is divided between
classes and discussions and work
with the campers.
Children are referred to the
camp by cooperating social agen-r
cies which select them on a basis
of their need for specialized camp-
ing.
Individual Aid
These groups are familiar with
the problems which each boy faces
and assist the camp in determin-

ing what individual aid he needs.
After he returns home the agency
continues treatment so that the
camp becomes a part of a planned
guidance program.
From the beginning University
students have helped "send the
kids to camp." This year's campus
wide tag clay will be held Wed-
nesday with a goal of $5,000. It
will be headed by student mem-
bers of the Fresh Air Camp Ex-
ecutive Committee representing
major campus organizations.
leaching Jobs
Open Abroad
Three special representatives of
the American Dependent Schools
will interview teachers May 6 and
7 for teaching positions in Europe
and Japan.
Teachers who are interested in
teaching American children in the
Dependent Schools should contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 201
Mason Hall at once.
The minimum age for these po-
sitions is 25. Applicants must have
some teaching experience. The be-
ginning salary is $3,500.
Positions are open in all fields,
although elementary teachers are
in the greatest demand.

Faculty Must
File for New
Tax Benefits
University faculty and staff
members who will receive special
benefits under the new income
tax law should file a new tax
withholding exemption certifi-
with the University Payroll Of-
fice before May 1.
This was the request of the
University Payroll Office. It calls
attention to the two special bene-
fits incorporated into the new tax
law:
An extra $600 exemption for
taxpayers over 65 years of age
plus an additional $600 exemp-
tion for wives over 65. This ex-
tra exemption will be allowed
either if a person already is 65
or will become 65 during 1948.
These amounts are in addition
to the regular exemption of .600
emption forms may be obtained
from the Payroll Office, Room 9,
University Hall.

Into Academyi v

Francis Takei Engineering Society Initiates

The campus chapter of Tau
jBeta Pi, national engineering
For his research on influenza, honor society, initiated four "U
Prof. Thomas Francis, Jr., profes- gra atesnits history last Tueday
sor of epidemiology at the Uni- The newly-initiated members of
versity, has been elected to mem- Tau Beta Pi are:
bership in the National Academy Graduates:
of Sciences, the Academy' an- Robert M. Vanduzer, Thomas P.
nounced yesterday. Whitsitt, rthur Williams and Wil-
Dr. Francis has received partic- liam H. Hasselbach.
ular recognition for his research Pledge group:
on influenza. He served during the Robert P. Alley, Herbert Bleck-
war as director of the Commission er. Warner Blumenthal, Ronald C.
on Influenza of the Surgeon Gen- Bostrum, Percival J. Clark, John
eral's Office. This Commission de- E. Cline, James R. Connel, Mil-
veloped an influenza virus vac- ton D. David, Bruce M. Davidson,
tine which was used for the en- Charles S. Doherty, Robert J. Dox-
tire Army in 1945. tader, John E. Ewing, Richard H.
Dr. Francis now hols th~e p- Fashbaugh, Louis M. Fiteny, Har-
sition of Henry Sewall Univer- Ian W. Frerking, Clarence R. Gar-
sity Professor of Public Health in fet, Thomas S. Heines, John R.
the University School of Public Hesse, John W. Hindes, Harry
Health. Among other research in- Holiday, Jr., Thomas K. Holland
terests, he is directing University and Leon M. Jaroff.
investigations of poliomvelitis. The list continues with Kenneth

J. Kammeraad, Robert E. Keith,
George E. Kellenburger. Marvin
M. King, Barton S. Koslow, Bill
E. Langhor. Herbert L. Mailander,
Lyle A. Maxey. Leland A. Moore,
Phillip W. Morris, Frank M.
Murphy, Joseph E. Murphy, Ed-I
ward R. Price and Reuben W. Pet-
erson, Jr.

4 'U' Graduates, Pledge Group

U' Engineers
To Celebrate
,Anniversary

Others initiatedw were George
T. Rager, James H. Robinson,
Duncan A. Roos, Craig M. Rowley,
George R. Sandenburgh, Forbes S.
Sibley, Herbert E. Smith, James
D. Stinchcombs, Roy W. Sommers,
Richard H. Stroebe, Abraham I.
Tersoff, Charles F. Thomas, An-
drew Turner, Richard E. Wagner,
Charles E. Wittliff, William G.
Wolber and Donald E. Yost.
$6.00 Now-$6.50 "E" Day.

The fiftieth anniversary of the
establislmient of the University
departm~ent of chemlical engineer-
ing will be observed Saturday,
May 8. in an all-day alunni pro-
gramnhere.
Speakers at an afternoon ses-
sion in the Architecture Building
auditorium will be Dr. Willard
Dow, president of the Dow Chem-
ical Co., and University Regent
Ralph A. Hayward, president of
the Kalamazoo Vegetable Parch-
ment Co.
The department will hold open
house during the mornin. Profes-
sor-emeritus A. H. White, first
chairman of the department, will
preside at a luncheon at the
Michigan Union at which several
aiumni will speak.

"Home of 3-Hour
Odorless Dry Cleaning
CLEAN ERS
Plant: 630 S. Ashley
Branch: 619 Packard
Phone 4700

TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of a ll makes -
Sold,
Bought,
Rented, -
Repaired
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
0. 1. MORRILL
314 South State St.
G. L. Requisitions Accepted

DAILY OF FICIAL B-ULLETIN

for the DISCRIMINATING Jewelry
hadmade jeke/ny
Expertly designed in
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Kep joel s 1ainderaft art

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Mother's Day
May 9th
Why not rememher Mot her
with a slip from the
Smartest Hosiery Shoppe?
Lace trim and Tailored
Styles in Crepes and
Satins . . Sizes 32-50
a
£Smarte4 t
HOSIERY SHOPPE
Michigan Theater Bldg.

Fordl Ini Today
One hundred and five business
administration and engineering
students will visit the Ford River
Rouge plant following a noon
luncheon today at Dearborn Inn.
The group, which is sponsored
by Delta Sigma Pi, business ad-
ministration fraternity, will leave
at 11 a.m. from the corner of
Tappan and Monroe Sts. to re-
turn at 5 p.m., according to Ed
Wisniewski, of the fraternity tours
committee.
T. A. Beaver, director of Sal-
aried Personnel of the Ford Motor
Co., will discuss "Opportunities
in the Ford Company," following
the luncheon.

MUSICAL
SUPPLIES
REEDS - STRINGS
We curry VAN DORN REEDS
Complete
Musical Repair
PAUL'S
MUSICAL REPAIR
209 E. Washington Ph. 8132

(Continued from Page 4)
Tenor; James Pease, Baritone;
and Leon Fleisher, Pianist.
Sixth Concert -- Sunday, 8:30
p.m. Eugene Ormandy, Conductor;
Cloe Elmo, Contralto.
For detailed programs inquire
at University Musical Society,
Burton Tower, Ann Arbor. Tick-
ets, if available, will be on sale
through Wednesday, April 28, at
the Musical Society offices; and
beginning Thursday morning
through Sunday at the box office
in Hill Auditorium.
Official program books with
analyses, text of numbers, etc.,
will be on sale in the lobby of Hill
Auditorium preceding each per-
formance.
Programs will begin on time,
and doors will be closed during the
performance of numbers.
Carillon Recital: 7:15 p.m.,
Thurs., April 29, by Percival Price,
University Carillonneur. Program
to include compositions and ar-
rangements by Jef Denyn: Ar-
rangements for carillon of J. B.
Martini's Gavotte, I. J. Plyel's
Sonata 5, and a group of old Flem-
ish folk songs compositions for ca-
rillon, Prelude, Andante cantabile,
and Ave Maria.
Events Today
Radio Program
5:45 p.m. - WPAG - Campus
News.
Student-faculty Hour: 4-5 p.m.,
Russian Tea Room, Michigan
League. Departments of Sociology
are invited.
Ordnance film hour: 7 p.m., Trurs.
April 29 at the home of Major
Niccolls, 1309 Geddes. Attendance
is restricted to 1st and 2nd year
students intending to elect Ord-
nance in their third year and Ad-
vanced Course Ordnance students.
Program:
"Vacuum tubes - Elementary
Electron Theory and the Diode
Tube."
"Vacuum tubes-the triode and
multi-purpose tubes."
"Mechanisms of the M5 and M6
Nechanical Directors."
"Employment of Electrical Di-
rectors."
"The Combat Team."
The Art Cinema League will
present Charlie Chaplin and Marie
Dressler in TILLIE'S PUNC-
TURED ROMANCE; also James
Mason in I MET A MURDERER.
8:30 p.m., Thurs., Fri., and Sat.,
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. Tick-

ets will be available at the box of-
fice daily at 2 p.m. For reserva-
tions, phone 6300.
Gilbert and Sullivan Society:
Meeting of all those interested in
production work on I.M.S. Pina-
fore. 7:30 p.m., Michigan League.
Room assignment will be posted.
International Center weekly tea:
4:30-5:30 p.m., Thurs., April 29.
Hostesses: Miss Elizabeth Wagner
and Mrs. Leona Diekma.
Sphinx Club: 7:30 p~m., Vxn
220. Michigan Union.
Alpha Phi Omega, National
Service Fraternity: Meeting for
all members and pledges. Michi-
gan Union.
Sigma Delta Chi: 7:30 p.m.,
Michigan Union.
Kappa Phi: 5:30 p.m., Wesleyan
Guild Lounge, Methodist Church.
United World Federalist Study
Group: 7:30 p.m.. Michigan Un-
ion. Topic: "The Electoral Unit
in a World Legislature and the
Problem of Representation."
Kindai Nihon Kenkyu Kai:
Movie: "Futari Tsuma," sponsored
by the Center for Japanese Stud-
ies, 7 p.m., Rackham Amphithea-
tre.
Coming Events
AVC Picnic: Sat., May 1, Uni-
versity Fresh Air Camp. Buses
leave 4-15 p.m. See notices on
League and Union bulletin boards.
Members and friends invited.
International Center's Instruc-
tion classes in American Ball
Room Dancing will resume Friday,

April 30, Room 302, Michigan Un-
ion, 8-10 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
Friday Evening Services from 7 to
7:30 p.m. to accommodate those
who wish to attend the May Fes-
tival.
German Coffee Hour: 3-4:30
p.m., Fri., April 30, Michigan
League Coke Bar. Students and
faculty members invited.
Women of the University Fac-
ulty: Informal Tea, 4:30 p.m., Fri.,
April 30, Club Lounge, Michigan
League. School of Nursing faculty
in charge.
INVITATIONS
O and 0
( ANNOUNCEMENTS
PRINTED
EMBOSSED
and ENGRAVED
RAMSAY-CANFIELD
119 East Liberty
(Across from P-Bell) A
Phone 7900

"No, she's not crazy...

A GALLERY OF JFINE GIFTS
802 South State - Near Hill

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she simply refuses
to hide her

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a ,
1
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1
00
Y N AT 8 Etlfo'?*

$ ftS£V ,,
14

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See them in Detroit at ERNST KERN . CROWLEY MILNER

Free booklet: "WARDROBE TRICKS". Write Judy Bond, Inc., Dept. B, 1315 Broadwgy, New York 18

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Extraordinary Clearance!

Jhe

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illon

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309 Sou'r-r STATri.S-riuA.i

SUITS

Menswear flannel, gabardines, novelty wools, Forstman wools.
Sizes 10 to 40.
A few three-piece suits included in this sole!

formerly to $65
$38

formerly to $99.50
$58

formerly to $119.95
$68

i

DRESSES

I

longs, shorts
The chances are you
already know it- men
prefer Palm Beach. for
summer. So take the tip
and enjoy the smart coot
comfort of these
Sacony-tailored slacks,
shorts and pedal pushers.
There is no premium on them-
in fact, they're whistling values.
Brown or Navy Sizes 10 to 18

,and middlins
SoconyCiella
'.boric shirt... .3.50

Gabardines,
formerly
to $17.95
$10

plain and printed crepes, sheer wools
Sizes 10 to 20, 7 to 15 and half sizes.

formerly
to $29.95
$15

formerly
to $37.95
$25

cirld taffetas.
formerly
Ito $79.95
$35

1 /

JACKETS.
Plain and Plaid 100% Wools
Tweeds. Sizes 11 to 18. For-
merly $14.95 to $21.95.
SKIRTS
Jerseys, plain and novelty
wools. Sizes 22 to 30. For-
merly $7.95 to $14.95.

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1/2
Reduced

RAINCOATS
A selected group in sizes 14
to 20. Formerly $17.95 to
$37.95.
UMBRELLAS
Slightly soiled
GIRDLES

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GINSBURG
FURS
Calling all Daily
Readers for this
"May Festival
Weekend" Special!
02
on all c
ing, gla
i ng,

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f.;;r
.. , .,

Sacony-tailored
pedal pushers-.-7.95

-e~

"f
i y
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)% Discount
old storage, insurance, clean-
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Socony-tailored

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f
x
Sacony-tailored
slacks ... 8.95

and some girdeliers in
in broken sizes.

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Re-winterize your furs and cloth
apparel at our low summer prices.
Individualized cleaning and insur-
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N
III

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AM

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