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April 25, 1948 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-04-25

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1948

THE~MICHIGAN DAILY GE

WHEN SITTING IT OUT :
Local Songstresses Reveal
'tioughts While on PodiUmIl

By JIM JACKOWSKI
"Just what does a gal vocalist
think about while she's sitting
apart on the bandstand between
vocals?"
Strangely enough, two girls
singing with local orchestras of-
fered almost identical answers to
this intriguing question.
Jackie Ward, songstress with
Tom McNall's band, explained,
"You think about a lot of things,
mostly about the people who are
dancing in front of you and what
they're thinking about. Also, you
Educators Ask
Well Rounded
us. Ad. Mei
Business men in the field and
educators at Michigan are agreed
that Business Administration
graduates have difficulty express-
ing themselves either on paper or
before an audience.
The criticism was affirmed by
Business men attending the Ac-
counting Employers' Conference
here last week.
Richard S. Claire told the con-
ference that "We need more busi-
ness men and fewer technicians.
College students specializing in ac-
counting or other areas of busi-
ness practice need a good founda-
tion of general education."
"We need," he said, "men who
can write concisely and smooth-
ly."
The School of Business Admin-
istration is well aware of the sit-
uation, according to Prof. Leo
Schmidt, accounting instructor
who supervised the conference.
Prof. Schmidt told the Daily
that "the criticism is one which
we receive quite often-that stud-
ents are unable to express them-
selves in writing and on their
feet."
"It may be due to the fact that
from grammar school on, the writ-
ing instruction is poor,"
Prof. Dorothy Gre6nwalt who
teaches the only writing courses
offered on the Business Adminis-
tration school curriculum, "Bus-
iness Letter Writing" and "Report
Writing," said in an interview
that "the real responsibility lies
with the individual."
"He has to recognize the im-
portance of writing. The Business
school requirements permit him to
elect courses outside, and many
do take speech and English
courses. Also, six hours of English
are required for entrance."
Center Will Teach
Opinion Poll Class
Methods of conducting public
opinion and attitude surveys will
be taught in a special four-week
summer session at the University,
July 19 to August 13.
The session, to be conducted by
the Survey Research Center, will
include introductory and ad-
vanced courses in survey research
and sampling methods.

try to keep your mind on the key
of the numbers coming up"
Marge Ann, vocalist with Frank
Tinker's orchestra, put it this way,
"Quite frequently I think of the
music. I watch the people and the
lovely gowns."
Asked about the influence of
popular vocalists on her style,
Miss Ward, a University second-
semester freshman, said, "You
try not to imitate anyone. You
try to develop a style of your
own.''
Marge Ann, who is not a stu-
dent and commutes to and from
Flint for her vocal chores, agreed
with this. However, both girls ex-
pressed a great deal of admira-
tion for popular songstress Sarah
Vaughan. Both were enthusiastic
in praising their respective or-
chestras, too.
As an afterthought, Marge Ann
added, "I wish the point could be
stressed that a girl vocalist is try-
ing to create a mood, to put the
meaning of a song, its story,
across."
In this respect, both girls
seemed to be doing right well.
Winning Video
Plays Named
Prize Scripts Will
B relevized in May
Winners in a competition for
television script writers for speech
department video shows to be pre-
sented next month over WWJ-
TV were announced yesterday by
Garnet R. Garrison, who will pro-
duce the shows.
Robert Hauke, Vance Simonds
and Patricia Merritt, were select-
ed. They will pioneer in the writ-
ing of special television scripts for
the Detroit station.
Hauke has written a comedy,
"Mr. Plummerton Finds the
Truth," which will be televised
Sunday, May 16. Miss Merritt
and Simonds collaborated on the
second script, a drama entitled
"Blood on the Land," to be pre-
sented May 30.
"Mr. Plummerton" will be di-
rected by Prof. Hugh Norton of
the speech department, and T. C.
Battin will direct "Blood on the
Land."
Campus
Calendar
Movie-The Good Earth, 8 p.m.,
Kellog Auditorium. -
State Theatre-Out of the Blue,
1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 p.m.
Michigan Theatre-Tycoon, 1,
3:10, 5:20, 7:30; and 9:40 p.m.
Spring Parley Committee -
Meeting, 4:15 p.m., Monday, the
Union.
Speech Clinic Movies - Life
Begins Again, Training of the
Young Deaf Child, Eyes. at Sea,
8:30 p.m., Monday, Rackham Am-
phitheatre.

PENSIVE-Lovely songbird Ev-
elyn Knight offers a challenge
to the best of psychologists to
guess what thoughts are spinn-
ing behind her "singers mask."
Trout Angling
Season Opens
Grab the casting rod and get a
fishing license, the trout season
is officially open.
All Ann Arbor hardware stores
are selling the $1.50 fishing li-
censes and $1 bright green trout
stamps and they are going like
fish-cakes.
Silvan Pond, near Chelsea, is
the best local spot to go after
trout, the managers reported. The
government has 'planted' the pond
and other nearby waters with
trout in the past few years.
Michigan conservation officials
estimate 200.000 will head for the
waters here and in the Upper
Peninsula.

Space Insured
For European
Summer Trip
Allocation by the Maritime
Commission of two ships to trans-
port students to and from Europe
this summer assures passage for
an estimated 6,000 young Ameri-
cans.
Administrator of the Student
Ship Program for the Marine Tig-
er and the Marine Jumper, C-4
type "emergency class" passenger
vessels, will be the Institute of In-
ternational Education, 2 West 45th
street, New York.
Two Dutch transports, the Ko-
ta Inten and Tabinta, each carry-
ing 750 persons, will make one
eastbound voyage from Quebec
on June 18 and July 1, respective-
ly. The return trip will be handled
by the Holland-America liner
Volendam, carrying 1500.
American vessels will make four
round-trips, eastbound from New
York to Plymouth and Le Havre,
westbound from Southampton
and Le Havre. Two voyages will
continue from Le Havre to Oslo,
Norway.
The scheduled sailings of the
Marine Tiger are June 3, June 29,
July 24, Aug. 20. The Marine
Jumper will sail June 17, July 17,
Aug. 11, Sept. 11. Return trips will
end with the Marine Jumper's de-
parture from Southampton, Sept.
22.
One-way fares range from a
minimum of $140 dormitory-style
to a maximum of $200 for six-
passenger staterooms. Cost of pas-
sage also varies with the destina-
tion.

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G.I. BILL APPROVAL
Mexico City College Offers
Pro ram for U.S. Students

'ZA
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as attention getting as a train whistle
The rugged Sanforized C I'TON
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em both off with a perky CrewIlat.
Jacket. . . 5.95
Jeans . . . . 4.95
Crew Hat . . 1.95

By PAT JAMES
Even if you don't speak Span-
ish, you can still go to summer
school in Mexico.
The attractive prospect of tak-
ing ten-week courses (in English)
at Mexico City College has been
made available to students by the
formation of a Michigan Study
Group, which seeks to recruit 100
students from different Michigan
colleges for the expedition.
Directing the study group will
be Dr. Philip C. Newman, profes-
sor of economics at the University
of Detroit. Dr. Newman will ap-
pear at the meeting of La Socie-
dad Hispanica Wednesdays to an-
swer questions about the proposed
group study project.
Official Movies
Senor Rivera Torres, the Mexi-

ficial government movies of Mexi-
co to the students.
Among the subjects to be offer-
ed at the Mexico City College
summer session are Spanish, Lat-
in American culture, business ad-
ministration, marketing, psycho-
logy, and social sciences.
G.I. Approval
Mexico City College is fully ac-
credited under the G.I. Bill of
Rights. There is a special Vet-
eran's attache in the American
Embassy in Mexico City and all
checks are paid directly by him.
The cost of board and room per
week ranges from about 18 to 25
dollars (American money). By
traveling in a group, students will
be able to make joint arrange-
ments for visas, living accommo-

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VPice4 £1ajhe4

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-o During our EOM Sale
Tomnorrow ltun' Friday

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$1.98 to $5.991
White or colors in all sizes.
Long and short sleeves.
Worth to $10.95. You'll
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FORMALS
$5.00 to $19.95
Sheers, taffetas, cottons
in pastels. Sizes to 16.
Values to $35.00.

SLIPS
$3.50 to $6.0
Tailored or lacy, flesh or
white, satin or crepe. Val-
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BAINCOATS
$19.95 and $25.00

Shorts . . . . . 3.95
Halters . . . . 2.95
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repellent coats
10 to 18.

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Sizes 9-15, 10-40. in prints,$
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1 0 rayons or gabardines. Drape $19.95
or flare styles. Values to $35.
ALL SALES FINAL
100i
Gabardines, coverts. shetlands $25
Wool and suedes in sizes 10-44. Pas-
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long or short styles. Suits with_

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