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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 23, 1948 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-04-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE E

BEGINNING TO SEE LIGHT:
There's Much More To Pai'
Of Glasses Than Meets Eye

Unique House on Chtirch Street
Is Surrounded by East Quad

In these days of intensive spe-
cialization, the faulty-visioned
person is faced with a three-
horned dilemma when it comes to
selecting the man who is going to
prescribe the eye-glasses.
In an effort to straighten out
this problem we consulted a few
local professional eye men to get
the word on the differences among
the opthamologists, oculists, cp-
temetrists, and opticians.
Well, to begin with, the optham-
ologist is the most highly-skilled
of all. In addition to the regular
eight years required for the M.D.
degree he generally spends an-
Mitchell Wins
Iearst Contest
Speech Major Takes
State Championship
r
Don Mitchell, a senior speech
major from San Bernardino, Cal-
" if., went :to Detroit Tuesday,
spoke for six minutes on Benja-
min Franklin, and returned with
the State Championship in the
annual Hearst Oratorical Con-
test.
In addition to the $150 State
prize, Mitchell won a chance to
go to Chicago May 10 to compete
in the Midwestern zone elimi-
nations, and then-he hopes-to
try for the national champin-
ship.
In his first crack at the Hearst
contest last year, he got only as
far as the campus championship.
He has also won the annual
Northern Oratorical League Con-
test among Big Nine schools.
Intending to make a career of
law, Mitchell has been active in
Play Production, radio, and de-
bate.

other °three years in intensive
study of the eye. His work is thus
refined to treatment and exami-
nation of the eye only, a large
share of which is surgical.
The oculist, also an M.D., does
not specialize as keenly as the op-
thamologist in that he generally
combines his practice with ear,
nose, and throat treatment The
oculist is trained for surgical work,
but it is not the general practice
for them to handle surgical cases.
These are referred to the optha-
mologist in mose cases.
Even though the optometrist
does not receive the medical de-
gree,he is licensed by the state in
which he practices to conduct Pye
examinations.
Although standards of the op-
tometrist are high . . . requiring
four years of schooling in some
states, and five years in others,
they are not licensed to perform
surgery or administer medication.
Theservices of the optician are
in another category entirely. He
may be one who sells or manufac-
tures optical equipment, or one
who grinds the prescriptions, se-
lects the size and shape of frame,
and adjusts the glasses to the pa-
tient..
Wilson R.. Staples, local opti-
cian, told us that it isn't neces-
sarily the imposing array of spe-
cialists confronting a person who
needs glasses that keeps him from
attending to it. It is rather that
he would rather spend his money
on something he considers more
practical, like a lawnmower, or a
new radio for the car than eye-
glasses.
"Most people will swear up and
down that they don't need glasses.
'I can see everything there is to
see. . .. I've never worn glasses in
my life' is the usual cry. They're
often amazed at the results of the
examination," said Staples.

DON JOLLIFF JOAN PINKOS
Lansing Eastern Detroit Pershing

Encampment
Will Combat
Discrimination
- An educational program de-
signed to promote better relations
among Americans of all races and
creeds will be carried out again
this summer at the 1948 Encamp-
ment for Citizenship, being held
from June 28 through August 7 in
New York City.
The four phases of the educa-
tional program are: the meaning
of democracy, the challenge of
human resources and human
needs, the challenge of economic
resources and human needs, and
the challenge of war and the need
for peace.
Admission is open to any Amer-
ican between the ages of 17 and
23. For information regarding'
the 1948 session, write Encamp-
ment for Citizenship, 2 West 64th
St., New York 23, N.Y., or call
Vince Lowenberg, 1948 Encamp-
ment Scholarship winner, 2-2996.

LANSING VS. DETROIT:

CAROL HODGES JIM STARR
Detroit Pershing Lansing Eastern
31 ~ rCampus

Residents of the house at 726
Church Street are in the:(,uniue
position of having themselves sur-
rounded by students on all sides
but one.
Their house is set between two
wings of the East Quad annex, be-
ing surrounded on three sides by
the dormitory.
Rumors to the contrary, this
dilemma did not arise over the re-C
fusal of the owners to sell the
Local Artists
To Hold Showr
Will Exhibit Work
Of County Residlents
The 25th annual Ann Arbor
Artists Exhibition will be held in
the R.ackham Building galleries
from April 28 to May 14, accord-
ing to an announcement by the
Ann Arbor Art Association.-
The exhibit is the annual "No-
Jury" show open to artists resid-
ing in Washtenaw County.
Each exhibitor may enter two
works in any medium, three craft
works. or three craft works in
addition to two entries in the ma-
jor categories.
All exhibiting artists must be
members of the Ann Arbor Art
Association and pay an exhibition
fee. Entries must be delivered di-
rectly to the Rackham Galleries
Saturday, April 24.
Entry blanks are available from
the Ann Arbor Art Association.
Further information may be ob-
tained by calling Donald Gooch
at 8761 or Mrs. J. F. Albano at
5558.

house to the University when con-
struction of the East Quad was
begun. Actually, the University
owns both the house and the land
it occupies.
Several other houses on the
tract of land now occupied by the
dormitory were razed to make
room for construction of the East
Quad annex. Blueprints for the
dormitory extension revealed,
however, that it would be unneces-
sary to remove the Church Street
house. Because of the housing
shortage, University officials de-
cided to leave it standing.
The house, a large brown stuc-
co building is now occupied by the
families of two construction of-
flicials.
Raymond C. Daly, one of the
officials, said that he expects to
reside in the house indefinitely.
"The house will eventually be re-
moved at the discretion of Uni-
versity officials," he said. Daly
intends to reside in the house un-
til the.University decides to re-
move it.
Bale, Dumond Speak
At Historical Meeting
Prof. F. Clever Bald and Prof.
Dwight L. Dumond of the faculty,
will participate in the program of
the Mississippi Valley Historical
Association meeting in Rock Is-
land, Ill., today.
"Colonel John Francis Han-
tramck" will be the subject of a
talk by Prof. Bald, who is assist-
ant director of the Michigan His-
torical Collections.
Prof. Dumon, of the history de-
partment, will be one of three
speakers in a session on book re-
viewing.

Arbitration of Labor isputes

Calendar

Michigan Forensic Day will
bring 1,000 high school students
to the University for the annual
state championship debate at 8
p.m. today in Rackham Lecture
Hall.
Participants in the contest will
be Lansing Eastern High and De-
troit's Pershing High, debating
the question of compulsory arbi-
tration of labor disputes in basic
American industries.
Don Jolliff and Jim Starr of
Lansing will uphold the affirma-
tive, while Joan Pinkos and Carol
Hodges will argue the negative for
Pershing.
Finalists won their way to the
contest after a series of practice
and elimination debates begin-
ning last November. More than
1,000 Michigan high school stu-
dents participated.
Individual awards of gold wrist

watches will be presented to the
four finalists by the Detroit Free
Press. Trophy awards will be giv-

Lawyers Guild - Panel
sion on Taft-Hartley Act,
Rm. 150 Hutchins Hall,
Walter Holtkamp -

discus-
4 p.m.
Organ

en by the Michigan High School builder, lecture, 5 p.m. Hill Audi-
Forensic Association, a division torium.
of the University Extension Serv- Michigan Schoolmasters Club -
ice.
Speaker, Alden B. Dow, "The
Dr. Eugene B. Elliott. stateon Growth of Design," 2 p.m., art
crintendent of public insti~uc tion, a~nd Architecture Auditorium.
will serve as debate chairman. MdriectuAr Ciem
Judges will be Profs. G. E. Dens- Movie - Art Cinema League,
more and Carl G. Brandt of the IRA presents "The Good Earth" 8
speech department and Prof. Ru- p.m., Kellogg Auditorium.
pert L. Cortwright, head of the Michigan--"This Happy Breed,"
Wayne University speech depart- 1, 3:10, 5:10, 7:10 and 9:10 p.m.
ment. State-"Out of the Blue," 1, 3,
The visitors have been invited 5, 7 and 9 p.m.
to attend the Honors Convocation
at Hill Auditorium. Later they
will take a tour of campus, see the
Rose Bowli movies and hear a con-
cert by the student choirs of Lan
sing Eastern and Pershing High
Schools.
___r---M A B v

.; '

THIS SUMMER

Costumes! Carnival! Congas!
Dance in a Romantic Atmiosphere
INTERNATIONAL
BALL'
Friday, April 3 9 to 1 All Campus
Michigan Union Semi-formal
Couple $3.60 or Costume

'I

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-, i

AILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

7

_ ___ _ _

SUPERB RECORDINGS
BY THE
Philadelphia Orchestra
under the direction of
EUGENE ORIMANDY
ON
COLUMBIA RECORDS
BRAHMS: Symphony No. 3

i

(Continued from Page 6)
Roger . Williams Guild: Work
party at the Church, 8:30 p.m.
Wear old clothes, come prepared
to paint and wish walls.
Coming Events
Annual French Play: Le Cercle
Francais will present "Les Cor-
beaux," a comedy in four acts by
Henry Becque, 8 p.m., Tues., April
27, Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Tickets on sale at the box office
from 2 to 5 p.m., April 24 and 26;
from 2 to 8 p.m., April 27. Free
admission to members of the club
(except tax) upon presentation of
their membership cards.
Gilbert and Sullivan Society:
Full rehetrsal 2 p.m. Sat., April
24.
Recreational swimming for
women students: 9 to 11 a.m. on
Saturdays through May 22, Union
Pool.
Graduate Outing Club: Meet
for sports and picnic at 2:30 p.m.,
Sun., April 25, northwest entrance,
Rackham Bldg. Sign up at Rack-
ham check desk before noon Sat-
urday. All graduate students wel-
come.

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