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March 28, 1948 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-03-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

' TOTHE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 28, 1948

BUT WOMEN STAY AWAY:
Union Facilities Serve Thousands Daily
r. .,

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the last
in a series of three articles regarding
Union history, organization, finances
and policies.)
By GEORGE WALKER
"More than I could ever hope to
count-or even estimate" was
what Niel Fox, Michigan Union
doorman, said concerning the
number of peopledwho pass through
the Union front door each day.
Fox, whose first duty as door-
man is to preserve a 30-year old
tradition-thatof keeping femin-
ine feet from the sacred stone
steps of the front entrance-said
that he had never tried to count
the number of Union patrons in a
day, an hour, or even a minute.
And he wisely saved himself
the trouble, too, for in a single
day over 4,000 men pass through
the basement cafeteria alone.
There, according to taproom of-
ficials, who seemed to enjoy
compiling statistics, customers
consume in one day approxi-
mately 3,000 cups of coffee, 100
dozen doughnuts, 100 gallons of
ice cream, 200 banana splits, 400
malted milks and 500 cokes.
For the many thousands who
visit the Union daily for reasons
other than satisfying appetites, the
Union offers a wide selection of re-
creational facilities, varying from
a quick dip in the basement pool to
an afternoon of reading in one of
the luxurious easy chairs that fur-
nish the Pendleton Library,
Most Union facilities are de-
signed primarily for the use of
students. In fact, three rooms in
the Union tower have been set

Revivei Club
For Pre-Meds
Is Organized
The "Pre - Medical Society."
which meets at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow
min Rm. 305 of the Union, will not
start fror scratch, according to
records of the Society in the Office
of Student Affairs.
When the first Pre-Medical So-
ciety on campus was forced to dis-
band in 19042 because of the war,
it left behind not only a constitu-
tion already drawn up, but $16 in
the treasury, which the group now
forming can make use of.
The purposes of the Society, as
embodied in its constitution, are
(1) to offer to the pre-medical stu-
dent on the campus a unified or-
ganizatien, designed to meet his
social and academic interests, (2)
to further more intimate student
contacts and promote more per-
sonal student-faculty relation-
ships, and (3) to broaden the gen-
eral education of the students by
means of lectures, movies, and
tours of interest.
AIM To Hear
Psychologist
The Association of Independent
Men will hold a lecture-discussion
program at 7:30 p.m. Thursday,
April 1, in Rm. 316 of the Union.
Prof. Lowell Kelly of the psy-
chology department will discuss
"The Kinsey Report."
Following a discussion period,
members of AIM will explain their
plans to coordinate at indepen-
dent men's activities and to secure
increased facilities for indepen-
dents.

witehftARiY.TE
with MARY STEIN

l3

i - - L (

IDEAL FOR IDLING-The Pendleton Library, located on the sec-
ond floor of the Union, is a favorite place of students looking for
relaxation. It was donated by the widow of Edward Waldo
Pendleton, '72.
a * c
aside for the exclusive use of she Union's life expectancy at 75

three student honorary societies,
Michigauma, Vulcans, and Dru-
ids.
More than 100 campus organi-
zations use the many meeting
rooms on the second and third
floors for regular gatherings, and
faculty groups, alumni, and several
outside organizations also take ad-
vantage of these meeting places.
If the architects who estimated

years were correct, grandchildren
of the some 14,000 present mem-
bers of the Union will still be able
to enjoy its many facilities even in
1995, when the building will have
to be reconditioned.
Imagine the condition the carv-
ed taproom tables will be in by
that time if over those years, any
great percentage of the senior men
at Michigan take advantage of the
privilege of leaving their initials
engraved in their bewhittled tops!

Now that James Caesar Petrillo 8 p.m. WHRV--Candid
has lifted his ban on the use of live 8 p.m. WPAG-FM---U
musicians for television, almost Symphony Orchestra.
completely surrendering to the de- 1Vridaty
mands of the four major networks, 9:30 C K LTW -- - In for
the big race is on. Please.
It's the race between the "webs" 10 p.m. CKLW-- Toron
for television leadership. They're phony.
madly rushing to out-do each Saturday
other in televising musical pr~o-a 3 p.m. WWJ-Montre,
grams and getting affiliated tele- phony plays Schumain'
vision stations throughout the phony No. 4 in D Minor.
country. -_-_.
An example of the musical com-
petition developed last Saturday,
right after Petrillo capitulated.
The Columbia Broadcasting Sys-
tem (CBS) just barely beat the
National Broadcasting Company
(NBC) to the draw by televising
the Philadelphia Orchestra's 5 p.m.
concert. An hour and a half later
NBC took over, with a television
screening of Toscanini conducting
the NBC Symphony Orchestra.
All four of the major networks
(NBC, CBS, Mutual, and the Am-
erican Broadcasting Company)
have announced that they'll give
video showings to other musical
progr'ams.
Tonight Mickey Rooney takes to
the air in his own half hour dra-
ma show, (9:30 p.m. WJR) as
"Shorty Bell," a young reporter
scrambling his way up in the big-
time newspaper world. Screen
writers Frederick Hazlitt Brennan
and Richard Carroll are doing the
script for the weekly continuity-
type pr ,giam.
Program High-lights this week:
Today
3 p.m. WJR--New York Phil-
harmonic Orchestra plays music
from Act III of Parsifal, and Jupi-
ter Symphory.
9:30 p.m. WHRV-"Remember
The Day" with Deborah Kerr is
featured on "Theatre Guild."
10:45 p.m. WHRV-Michigan
Radio Workshop enacts "Mad
Money".
Monday
9 p.m. WWJ-Fritz Kreisler
plays his own Concerto in C on the
Telephone Hour.
Tuesday
9:30 p.m. WHRV-Boston Sym-
phony offers Mozart's Symphony
in D Major.
10 p.m. WJR-Walter Huston is
starred in Studio One's production
of "Babbitt."
Wednesday
10:30 p.m. WWJ-Jimmy Dur-
ante.
Thursday
7:30 p.m. WHRV-Henry Mor-
gan.

Continuous Daily from 1 P.M.
Shows
at
- 3- 5

Mike.
nivt'rsity
m a t i o n
to Syn-

4

and
LAWYER'S GUILD
present
THE PURITAN
TONIGHT at 8:30 P.M.
Tickets on Sale at Door - 7:45 P.M.
KELLOGG AUDITORIUM (Dental School)

Sym-i

{
1

Is Michigras the Place for Kids?

Kids are OK in their place, but
is Michigras the place?
For many years, Michigras has
been held on a Friday and Satur-
day night, and many people com-
plained about the large number of
children attending. This year it
was suggested that an extra ses-
sion, especially for the kiddies, be
held on Saturday afternoon.
Co-chairmen Rae Keller and

Keith Jordan have requested that
students having booths at Michi-
gras inform them if they would be
willing to work on Saturday after-
noon. They would also like to hear
comments from other students a-
bout the children problem.
Suggestions may be submitted to
MICHIGRAS, Student Offices,
Michigan Union.

SClassified Advertising

ri

S IE N IR
BA ILIL
SATURDAY, M4Y 22

41

A

PERSONAL
INSURANCE POLICY
on all dates . . . corsage from
CAMPUS CORSAGE SERVICE
Call 2-7032 between 8-12 P.M. )45
BUSINESS SERVICES
LAUNDRY-Washing and ironing done
in my home. Free pickup and de-
livery. Phone 25-7708. )41
BABY sitter, graduate student. Call
Marian after 4:30 p.m. 2-4220. )78
WATCH REPAIR-Done by an expert
with years of experience. A. Spring.
Jeweler, 221 S. 4th Ave. Phone 4834.
)14
TYPING: Theses, term papers, ad-
dresses. Duplicating: notices, form
letters, programs. A2 Typing Serv-
ice, 208 Nickels Arcade, Ph. 9811. )28
THINK OF HILDEGARDE'S when you
think of spring. Let us give your last
year's wardrobe that new look. Alter-
ations a specialty with prompt serv-
ice. Custom clothes and re-styling.
Hildegarde Shop, 109 East Washing-
ton, Telephone 2-4669. )87
LOST AND FOUND
GOLD signet ring, gray stone with
black, engraved family crest. Great
personal value. Reward. Box 95. )69
STRAYED--Silver Ronson lighter, in-
itials "E.W.K." Reward. Valued as
gift. See Mrs. Kruger, Physics Li-
brary. )87
RING OF KEYS near 433 Maynard on
Sunday. Call 8239. Mrs. H. G. Ben-
son. )89

HELP WANTED
YOUNG ladies-To show spring line of
Maisonette frocks. Full or part time.
Ph. 2-7856. )80
TRANSPORTATION
TWO WOMEN wish ride to Boston,
Thursday, Friday. Share expenses.
Box 78. )86
FOR RENT
IF YOU'RE graduating in June and need
an apartment in Detroit, we'll be
glad to exchange ours for yours in
Ann Arbor. Write Box 79. )85
SHARE pleasant double room one block
from canpus. Business woman or
graduate. 714 E. University. )92
FOR SALE
FOR SALE! Tailor made brown flannel
suit. 37 long. Like new. Cost $75.00.
Selling price $35. Call anytime at 307
North State St. )91
ACCORDION, 24 bass "Salanti." Ideal
for beginner, $50. Full size violin,
good condition, $20. Both have cases.
Reasonable, 2626 S. Main. Ph. 2-3063.
) 77
BICYCLE-English type, two years old.
Excellent shape; selling because of
graduation. $20. Call "Memphis" at
4741 or 4315. )83
FRUSTRATED skier will sell unused
Bass boots,, 10C. Millar. 2-2205. )93
CORONA PORTABLE typewriter in
good operating condition. Call at
Wagner's Store, 303 S. State. )35
CANARIES, large selection of top qual-
ity singers and females. Bird supplies,
cages. 562 S. 7th. Phone 5330. )30
FOR SALE-'35 Harley-Davidson "74,"
side-valve. New tires, brakes, genera-
tor, battery. All other parts in A-1
shape, $295. Get all set for Spring
Vacation. Call 2-6824, ask for Hopps.

HOPE to find my brown and tan loaf-
er coat containing Schaeffer pen and
pencil set, pipe, and tobacco pouch.
Reward! Bud, 200 Wenley House,
West Quad. )96
ROUND trip N.Y., Spring Vacation?
Leaving Friday-1947 Chevrolet-call
2-7170. )94

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