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February 10, 1948 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MI i iGA DA1L

New Staff Copes with
Added Enrollineit
To meet an increased enroll-
ment in the journalism depart-
ment, six Michigan newspaper-
men and' a magazine publisher
will teach writing courses during
the spring semester.
Prof. Wesley H. Maurer, exect-
tive secretary of the department,
announced that Allen Shoenfield
and Louis Tandler, special writers
on the Detroit News, R. Ray Bak-
er, science writer for Booth news-
papers, and William T. Brown-
son, co-publisher of the Washte-
naw Post Tribune will teach
courses in Advanced News Writ-
ing.
Karl Zeisler, associate editor of
the Monroe Evening News, will
teach Editorial Writing, Eck
Stanger, chief photographer of
the Ann Arbor News, will teach a
course in pictorial journalism,
and Lawrence W. Prakken, edi-
tor and publisher of Education Di-
gest and School Shop, will teach
copyreading and editing for mag-
azines.
Each of the lecturers will be in
charge of one class meeting twice
a week, with some of them also
dividing a weekly lecture assign-
ment.
Baker and Brownson were visit-
ing lecturers during the fall se-
mester. Baker taught specialized
reporting while Brownson gave in-
struction in a course on the com-
munity newspaper.
The fall semester innovation of
bringing in well-known newspaper
editors and publishers to give lec-
tures in journalism to classes and
the University, will be repeated,
Prof. Maurer also announced.
Arthur W. Stace, editor of the
Ann Arbor News, will give the
first lecture, and Dale Stafford,
managing editor of the Detroit
Free Press will give the second.
Arrangements have also been
completed with the Free Press
for an editorial staff member to
teach a journalism course during
the next fall semester.
Educators To Convene
The seventh annual State con-
ference on Higher Educatioan will
be held at the University February
13-14.
Principal speakers will be Ros-
coe 0. Bonisteel, of Ann Arbor, a
Regent of the University; Algo
Henderson, associate commission-
er for higher education in New
York; and Dean J. B. Edmonson
of the School of Education.

HON. ARTBUR BLISS LANEI
...speaks Iwer otonight
Lan eTo C i,3 ve
Foreigl PoliCy
Speech, TOda
Hon. Ari thur liss, , form
United States ambassador f Po-
land, will speak at 8:30 p.n. to-
day at Hill Audiuoriun on the
topic, "Our Foreign Policy-Right
or Wrong?"
The concluding speaker in the
1947-48 Oratorical Association
lecture series, Lane is considered
well qualified to speak notl only
on Poland. but on all aspects of
U.S. foreign policy. A Yale grad-
uate, he began his diplomatic
career at the Amerhcan Embassy
in Italy in 1916, and his subse-
quent assignments included War-
saw, London, Paris, Sw'itzerland
and. Yugoslavia, as well as many
other focal points of present
American foreign policy.
Accepting "with great reluc-
ance" Lane's resignation as am-
bassador to Poland in March,
1947, President Truman saw him
as a man capable of presenting
to the American public the "real
facts" concerning the Polish gov-1
ernment. It is Lane's contention
that Poland is nothing more than
a puppet state which has violated
the conditions of the Yalta and
Potsdam meetings.
When Lane saw the "farce"
being made of the "free and un-
fettered elections" prescribed for
Poland by the Yalta declaration,
he asked to be recalled to this
country to fully reveal the situa-
tion to the U.S. state department.
Tickets for Lane's lecture to-
night will be on sale today at
the Hill Auditorium box office.
'Ensian Deadline
All Ensian salesmen must re-
turn their salesbooks by Feb. 20.
Stubs turned in after that date
will be treated as $8 sales and the
$1 deficit will have to be ifd by
the salesman.

Stuidents Voice
Delight at New
BusAd School.
Deluxe Classro oms
Ace4'tinied "T errifiec
Student comment, on the new
Business Adm inistra ion Building
ran tio superlatives when the first
clases er hedt )her esterday
morning.
it's terrific," one student who
approved of all of the facilities in
general and of the built-in coat-
racks in particular.
"The acoustics are fine," anoth-
er student said. "The lights are
dlear. The seats are comfortable.
In fact, the classrooms are almost
pcerfect.
"odernism and Comfort
A similar degree of enthusiasm
was registered in other comments
on the south wing of the newly-
occupied building whose keynotes
are modernism and comfort.
Modernism is reflected in the
exterior design of the building and
in the classroom fixtures. The
fixtures include such features a-%
Venetian blinds; built-in fluores-
cent lights; new strip-type desks.
which provide 27 inches of note-
taking area for each student;
light, well-padded chairs; acoustic
tile ceilings; and countersunk
heating and ventillating units.
Loudspeakers in Rooms
Each room is provided with a
loud-speaker, permitting simul-
taneous broadcast of announce-
ments to all classes in session.
Students occupying the new
building expected it to be more,
convenient, as well as more com-
fortable, than previous accommo-
dations for business administra-
tion majors. Prior to its opening,
business administration classes
were held in nine other buildings
which were located at widely-sep-
arated points on the campus.
hurches Of fer
Special Services
Special services in ten local
churches on Ash Wednesday will
mark the beginning of the 40-
day Lenten season culminating in
Easter Sunday.
Morning, afternoon and evening
services will be held in two
churches on Ash Wednesday. St.
Andrew's Episcopal Church will
observe Holy Communist services
at 7:15 and 10 a.m. They will be
followed by a church school Lent-
en service at 4 p.m. A choral
litany in procession and a com-
mentary sermon by Rev. Henry
Lewis, church pastor, at 8 p.m.,
will complete the day's observ-
ance.

Students, City
To Honor Late
Hindu Leader
Students and local r esidnts
will join nationwide mourning for
the (tet allo M umda tidhi
with services at 4 p.m. tomorrow
in Rackham Amphitheatre.
Coinciding with a period of
mourning to be observe dnation-
ally from 3 to 5 pin., the service
will fea ur ewo proinent local
speakers.
Rev. H. E. Pickerill of the First.
Congregational Church will dis-
cuss "Gandhi's Message to ihe
West," and Prof. James M. Plum-
er, of the fine arts department,
will speak on "Our Debt to Gand-
hi." Leela Manibahi Desar, presi-
dent of the Hindustan Students
Association, will preside at. the
meeting.
Sponsors of the city-wide meet-
ing include: Hindustan Associa-
tion, Ann Arbor Friends Meeting,
Arab Club, Student Religious As-
sociation, International Students
Committee, Ann Arbor Council of
Churches.
Other sponsors are: Council of
Church Women, Hillel Founda-
tion, St. Nicholas Greek Ortho-
dox Church, Ann Arbor Baha
Assembly, Ann Arbor Branch of
the Women's In ternational
League, Beth Israel Sisterhood,
Hadassah, and the Westminste'
Guild.
Vei W'ives Club
TO Sponsor IDaulee
A Valentine Dance, sposored
by the Wives of Student Veterans
Club, will be held from 9 to 12
p.m. Saturday in the gymnasium
at the University Community Cen-
ter in Willow Village.
Ralph Wilson and his orchestra,
from Ann Arbor, will play for the
dance. The gym will be decorated
with a theme of "hearts and
flowers." Tables for bridge and
other games will be set up in the
club room.
Special guests at the dance will
be Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Cor-
rell, of Ann Arbor. Correll is the
newly appointed Veterans' Coor-
dinator at the University.
ITU Illjtlction.
Delayed iCour~xt
INDIANAPOLIS, Feb. 9-(1)-
A federal judge today delayed un-
til tomorrow a ruling on whether
publishers and a union may join in
the National Labor , Relations
Board suit for an injunction
against the International Typo-
graphical Union.
Judge Luther M. Swygert said
lie needed more time to consider
the question.
This delayed the arguments on
other hot questions,for- example,
on the constitutionality of Section
to-J of the Taft-Hartley Act, un-
der which the injunction is sought.
Union lawyers say this section vio-
lates the constitution and should
be wiped out by the court.

I[[

7:30 AM. - 12:00 MIDNITE

f

PROFIT BY OUR NEW POLICY
OF LOWER PRICES
313 SOUTH STATE

s

at REGULAR PRICES

TODAY, Wednesday and Thursday

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

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WANTED

WANTED-Dearborn commuters arriv-
ing on campus 9:00 a.m. leaving 4:00
p.m. to ride in 1946 Mercury. De3926.
William Fulton. )12
FOR SALE
THREE SUITS size 44 long; 1 tan Harris
tweed worn perhaps a dozen times, 1
gray pin-stripe worn half a dozen
times, 1 maroon pin-check never
worn. These suits were custom tail-
ored for the present owner and are
being sold only because a gain in
weight has rendered them too snug,
and because wife dislikes 3-button
single-breasted suits. No reasonable
offer refused. I am not trying to
stick anyone. Call 2-6244 evenings. )1
GOING T@ CALIFORNIA-Men's cloth-
ing for sale. Dubarry imported grey
tweed topcoat size 36-38-$25.00. 2
suits size 36, 1 brown wool, one grey
herringbone $20.00 each. One brown
wool herringbone suit, size 38-40,
$25.00. One brown wool mackinaw,
size 36-38, $8.00. Matched set of Tru-
Flite golf clubs, 3 woods, 5 irons,
$45.00. Phone 2-0701. )3
FOR SALE-Ladies diamond ring. One
large stone with four small side
diamonds in yellow gold setting
$75.00. Phone 20701.)5
SLIGHTLY USED drawing instruments
for sale. Excellent condition. Call
Bob Foote; 2-2565. )7
PREWAR Charvois drafting instru-
ments-unused. Value $36.50. Will sell
for $25.00 or best offer. Call Bentley,
28312, after 7:00 p.m. )10
LEICA ELMAR camera, condition like
new, f-5 cm, 3.5 lens, 1-1000th second
shutter speed. Phone 2-4401. Exten-
sion 317, Chicago House. )11
FOR SALE-1940 DeSoto 2-door fully
equipped, good condition. Call 2-2330
after 7:30 p.m. )18
1 MAHOGANY double bed, 1 walnut
chest of drawers, 1 mahogany chair.
Phone 25-7894. )23
FOR SALE-Men's suits, size 38-40.
Tuxedo, tails, silk hat, overcoat. Tele-
phone 2-0936, about 8 a.m. or 6 p.m.
)25

WANTED -- Press photographers for
Michigan Daily. Submit sample of
work to Editors. High rates paid for
pictures used. )22
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Last semester, small Eversharp
pen, blue frame glasses. Please call
Naomi, 7851. )2y
LOST-- Saturday night, left side South
University going from the Union to
Washtenaw, narrow gold bar pin.
Small diamond. Reward. Call Mrs.
Robert Waer, 2-2940. )4
LOST-Leather case containing 4 keys.
Call University ext. 763. )17
BROWN shell glasses, gold top. Lost
Saturday night, basketball game, near
vicinity. Call 2-4070. Reward. )29
BUSINESS SERVICES
DON'T BE LATE-Get "It's a Date!"
weekly guide to events in Ann Ar-
bor. Send name and address with
$1.00 to Jack Trustman, 1037 Olivia,
Ann Arbor. )15
THINK OF HILDEGARDE'S when you
think of spring. Let us give your last
year's wardrobe that new look. Alter-
ations a specialty with prompt serv-
ice. Custom clothes and re-styling.
Hildegarde Shop, 109 East Washing-
ton, Telephone 2-4669. )16
ALL KINDS of alterations, dress mak-
ing and tailoring. Tailormade button
holes. 2-6583. )24
ATTENTION-"Tie Swap." Are you sat-
isfied with the neck-wear :you now
have? Send us six fo your most un-
liked ties along with $1.00 and we'll
send you six you wil like. State color
and kind. Russ' Tie Exchange. Box
362. Fowlerville, Mich. )28
WANTED sewing, dressmaking; altera-
tions, or repairs. Miss Livingston. 315
S. Division. )27

FOR RENT
VACANCY for one man student in
triple room near campus. Excellen
furniture. 437 Hamilton Place. )
COMFORTABLE furnished apartment
suitable for two persons. Living room,
bedroom, kitchenette and bath. Elec
tric stove and refrigerator. Oil hea
-Telephone. $60 a month. P.O. Bo
500 Plymouth, Michigan. )
FOR RENT- One-half of double room
for a girl. One block from campus
Phone 2-0366. )I
ROOMS FOR MEN-Close to campus
1346 Geddes Ave. Telephone 2-7044.
)2£
HELP WANTED
AVON-A national advertised cosmeti
company offers women in Ann Ar
bor, Willow Run, and Ypsilanti, a
income opportunity. You can earn
good income with us and be inde
pendent. For information write Avo
Products, Inc., 1127 South Webste
Jackson, Michigan.
MONEY? Sell N.Y. Herald Tribune sub
scriptions. Write Campus Agency
Box 794, West Lodge, Ypsilanti. ) l
WANTED: Part time services of gra
student or teaching fellow in eihe
the department of economics, poli
ical science, law school or busine
administration. Will pay well f
work done. If interested, contact Mr
Poe, Campus Telephone 480. )l
EXPERIENCED men and women coup
selors for Jewish co-educational sum
mer camp in Michigan. General an
specialty counselors. Phone 2-843
evenings 5-9 p.m. )
WANTED-Writers for Michigan Dail
sports, womens and news staffs. E
perience unnecessary. Report to st
dent Publications Building Wedne
day, Feb. 11 at 4 p.m. )

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We print 'em all,
No Job too large or small.
Programs - Tickets
Stationery - Announcements
ROACH PRINTING
209 E. Washington Ph. 8132

VALENTINE
DANCE
Sponsored by
The Wives of Student
Veterans Club
Ralph Wilson's Orchestra
hDancing 9-12
Tickets $1.20 per couple
+ U
Univ. Community Center
Semi-Formal Floor Show
Tickets at Comm. Center
a _

n11 n n~ L n rLnFnn1J r LJs1aLLn
SERENADE
YOUR VALENTINE-
by Calling 4409
r
Featuring vocals by
Sr JACKIE WARD

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AVAILABLE THIS WEEKEND
Fl

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Patronize Daily Advertisers Regularly

TONIGHT at 8:30
1947-48 LECTURE COURSE

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presents

Call Dick for your house parties
-RECORDED MUSIC FURNISHED FOR YOUR
DANCING PLEASURE BY

ARTHUR BLISS LANIt
Former U.S. Ambassador to Poland wh
resigned last March to be free to tel
Americans of conditions in Europe.
"Our Froeign Policy-

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