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March 17, 1948 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Seven

Boxers

Gain

IM

Finals)

Crisler's Sudden Gridiro
Resignation Stuns Campus
Tomasi, Chappuis Express Amazement
As Late Call to Daily Touches Things Off

Ii

11

Sports Round-Up

I

I

I-;;-

Crisler...
(Continued from Page 1)
and will include among other
things a new swimming pool.
On the site of the present
Hockey Coliseum a new tennis pa-
vilion with 20 new courts is
planned. Crisler went on to say
that these porjects have been de-
layed due primarily to the tremen-
dous increase in the costs of op-
erating the present athletic facili-
ties.
At a recent press conference the.
Athletic Director said that "Any
$npances for the proposed build-
ing program will probably come
from our receipts and from a new
bond issue or loan which we may
} be forced to float."
He went on to clarify this state-
ment by saying, "The State Legis-
lature has never appropriated any
money for Michigan's athletic
buildings in the past and I can
see little possibility of a change in
their policy for the future."

Rutenik, Cox Slugging Tilt
Features Semi-Final Bouts

II

II

By LYLE NELSON
Seven serious students punched
their way into the finals at the
semi-final roundup of the I-M
boxing tournament last night at
the Sports Building arena.
A mixture ofhboxing and slug-
ging featured the matches which
saw only one bout fail to go the
three round limit. Dave Rutenik's
slugging row with Ed Cox in the
145 pound class turned out to be
the greatest crowd pleaser.
Dean Wins on KO
Varsity wrestler Byron Dean,
125 pound boxing champion last
year, moved into the finals of the
135 pound weight division by scor-
ing the only technical knockout
of the evening. Al Forn was no
match for Dean's wicked left hook
and the fight was stopped in the

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second round when Forn received
a cut near the right eye.
Forn could have gone the limit
but Referee Chuck Orwick de-
cided against it after Dean ex-
hibited his superior ring experi-
ence.
The Rutenik-Cox fight might
have been the worst match on the
card from the standpoint of ring
finesse but it easily led the night's
thrills insofar as the spectators
were concerned.
Sweet Victory
The victory was all the sweeter
for the Lakeview, Ohio puncher
who had substituted for the in-
jured Paul Starkle, his conqueror.
Rutenik was nearly swept off his
feet by the wildly swinging Cox
in the opening heat but recovered
sufficiently to take the offensive
half way through the second
round when Cox ran out of wind.
Rutenik's stamina carried him
through an action packed third
round.
Jim Edberg and Ben Ujehare
exhibited savy ring knowledge in
the closest fight of the evening
which went to Edberg by a ref-
eree's decision. The judges deci-
sion on the match was dead-
locked.
Other winners were all veterans
of last year's tournament. Morrie
Koblenz defeated Al Shelton in
the 135 pound class, Jack Hallberg
decisioned Al Bodinger and in-
tramural titlist Bob Harrison out-
pointed Conny Nelson in the 155
pound weight division. All of these
bouts were unanimous verdicts.
Footballer Allan Jackson and
Jim Brown put on a rugged slug-
fest in the heavyweight class with
Jackson taking the decision after
faltering in the second round.

RETIRED-Fritz Crisler turns
in uniform to concentrate on
administrative duty.
Hockey Squad
Leaves Today
For Colorado
Coach Vic Heyliger and 15 Wol-
verine pucksters will board a train
this morning at 7:55 for the
NCAA hockey playoffs at Color-
ado Springs, Colorado.
The decision of the NCAA board
by which Ted Greer, fourth high-
est scorer on the squad,'" was de-
clared ineligible, was reversed yes-
terday as the result of an appeal
by Heyliger.
Although not scheduled to play
their first game until Friday
night, the Wolverines' will arrive
tomorrow morning so that they
can loosen up their muscles after
the long trip and become adjusted
to the rarified atmosphere of the
mountains.
In the evening, the team will
watch Dartmouth and Colorado
College fight it out for a place in
Saturday's playoffs, and then
battle Boston College the next
night to determine who will fur-
nish the other half of Saturday's
competition. Heyliger rates Dart-
mouth as the team to beat in
this series. The Indians boast .19
wins in 20 starts.'

By BUD WEIDENTHAL
In a typicalair of the dramatic
that once caused George Trevor
of the New York Sun to compare
him to Douglas MacArthur, Fritz
Crisler announced to the nation
that he had stepped down as
Michigan's head football coach.
The clock on The Daily wall
read 11:50 Monday night when a
response to a ringing phone
brought a familiar voice. It was
Crisler himself.
"I have an important statement
for you," he said, "please come to
Room 114 of the Union."
Two members of The Daily
sports staff hurried to the des-
ignated room far back in the
corridors of the Union to re-
ceive the message.
Crisler, his secretary, and his
assistant, Ernie McCoy, were seat-
ed quietly in the smoke-filled
room. McCoy handed a sealed en-
velope to the reporters who left
the room immediately.
The envelope, of course, con-
tained the retirement statement--
the news was out, perfectly timed
and tremendously dramatic.
The first one contacted upon
return to The Daily office was
the captain-elect of the Wol-
verine grid squad, Dominic To-
masi.
The 20 year old guard was at a
loss' for words when informed of
his coach's retirement. He could
only let out a weird howl of
amazement and exclaim, "HOLY
CATS!"
After he regained his compos-
ure he said that, of course, he
was amazed and sorry to see Fritz
go, but that he thought "Bennie"
is a great coach.
All-American Bob Chappuis
then came to the phone and ex-
pressed a similar amazement at
the statement.
"It must have happened at the
board meeting tonight," said the
former Wolverine wingback.
"None of us had the slightest idea
that this was coming off," he add-
ed, "he never told us anything
about it."
Another phone call brought a
statement from the man of the
hour, Bennie Opsterbaan, who
was at home.
"I'm very happy about it," he
said. "I'm delighted with the op-
portunity and will do my best
to uphold the fine tradition that
Michigan enjoys."
He said that he had not at-
tended the board meetings but
that he lad been aware for some-
time of the situation.

He was quick to indicate that
there would be no change in
Michigan's style of - football that
"Fritz" had established so well.
He announced the appoint-
ment of George Ceithaml, for-
mer JV coach and Wolverine
backfield ace, to backfield
coaching spot on his staff. He
said that Jack Blott would stay
on as line coach and that the
end coach position vacated by
Art Valpey was still open.
Professor Ralph Aigler, Mich-
igan's Big Nine faculty represen-
tative was then contacted. His
explanation was clear and con-
cise-Mr. Crisler was not resign-
ing, he said. He was merely re-
tiring from one of the three posi-
tions he now holds at Michigan
-Head Football Coach, Director
of Athletic Publicity and chair-
man of the physical education de-
partment.
He said, "We were all aware of
the fact that sooner or later he
would have to give up coaching.
Of course, we all wish he could
have stayed on as coach longer
but he has made his decision and
we have accepted it."

By The Associated Press
CHICAGO, March 16-Two new
collegiate head football coaches
were named yesterday at Indiana
and Yale.
Clyde B. Smith, coach at La-
Crosse, Wis., State Teachers' Col-
lege, got the call at Indiana.
While at New Haven, Yale tUni-
versity announced the appoint-
ment of Herman Hickman, line
coach at Navy since 1943.
* * *
DETROIT, March 16-The De-
troit Tigers added a fifth minor
league club to their chain today
with the purchose of the Toledo
Mudhens of the American Asso-
ciation. Besides owning five teams,

the American League team has
working contracts or agreements
with seven other clubs.
* * *
LAKELAND, Fla., March 16-
The Boston Braves greeted De-
troit Tigers relief pitcher Rufus
Gentry with three straight hits
in the 14th inning to gain a 4
to 3 exhibition win over the De-
troiters here today.
Successive singles by Danny
Litwiler, Tommy Holmes and
Frank Kerr brought in the win-
ning tally after Virgil Trucks had
held the National Leaguers run-
less with two hits from the sixth
through the thirteenth innings.

11. iti

WHO?

WHEN?

WHERE?

at The Wolverine

DEN

WHEN ?

WHERE?

WHO? Jackie Ward as Vocaist
with TOM McNALL and his Band!

READ THE DAILY TOMORROW!

I

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0

r-

Hilkene Receives
Football Trophy
Bruce Hilkene, captain of the
Wolverine football team and
Big Nine champions, will re-
ceive a post-season trophy at
8:15 tonight from Mayor Dan
Quirk in behalf of the people
of Ypsilanti.
The inscription on the cup
states simply that it is being
awarded to the "Rose Bowl"
champions for what they have
done to promote good sports-
manship and their contribution
to Washtenaw County.

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