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March 14, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-THIE 1 HGA -DHY_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

'M' FOES CLASH!
NCAA Playoffs Match
Colorado and .Dartmouth

Trackmen aud Fonv yle NCAAMeet

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the third
in a series of articles dealing with
the forthcoming NCAA Hockey tour-
nament in Colorado Springs.)
By B. S. BROWN
Colorado College will be facing
what is generally considered the
finest hockey team in the nation in
the first game of the NCAA play-
offs next Thursday night when it
takes on the high-scoring Dart-
mouth University squad.
Faltering slightly in the latter
part of its season when they played
four games on the road, the Tigers
ended the season with 16 wins and
six losses.
Beginning the campaign with
a rousing 26-3 victory over Om-
aha University's puckmen, the
Coloradans roared through 16
games, losing a single contest to
the University of Saskatchewan,
8-4. They avenged the loss on
the following night, 6-3.
Four of the triumphs came over
Minnesota and Michigan Tech.
North Dakota was the next team
to hand a defeat to the Bengals,
as it rolled over the home club,
8-4, in the first of a two-game
series.
Again the Black and Gold boun-
ced back on the second night and
whipped the invaders, 6-3. Then
came the ill-fated road jaunt.
Travelling to Houghton, the
Rocky Mountain lads were rude-
ly upset in two games with the
Huskies ofmMichigan Tech, 4-0 and
3-2. Moving south after their two
reversals, the Tigers took on the
Wolverines in another two-game
series.

Heyliger's lads left no doubt
in Coach Cheddy Thompson's
mind that Michigan hockey was
among the finest in the country
as they walloped the Bengals,
3-1 and 6-1, on successive eve-
nings.
Where Michigan boasts speed
and finesse, the Colorado boys em-
phasize size. Maize and Blue fans
were given an opportunity to see
their team dwarfed by the visiting
squad, but in size only.
Roy Jkola, Bengal net-minder,
was outstanding in the crease in
both Colorado losses to Michigan,
and is an integral part of the
team's defensive brand of play.
Bill Tutten and Milo Yalich
were sturdy on defense, and their
200-pound frames proved to be
important in their back-check-
ing attempts. Bruce Stewart and
Lew Meier complete the defen-
sive quartet.
Joe Slattery, Dick Rowell and
Bruce Stewart make up Thomp-
son's first and high-scoring line,
and between them have accounted
for 110 points during the 1947-48
season.
Vern Wishart, Harry Whitworth
and Howie Hushion fill the offen-
sive-slots on the second line, and
Chris Ray and Joe Slattery are the
spares.
Though unsuccessful in their
four away games, the Tigers were
Sractically invincible on home ice.
Their 16-2 record at the Broad-
moor Rink attests to their super-
iority at home and makes them
an even-bet choice in the first
game with Dartmouth.

Perfect Form
Key to Fame
Of 'M' Great
By BUD WEIDENTHAL
The skyrocket to fame of Char-
lie Fonville continues to amaze all
who pride themselves in being ex-
perts of track and field.
When the 20-year-old junior
sent the longstanding indoor
mark crashing into the pages of
history three weeks ago many an
eyebrow was raised and many a
question was asked.
Natural Queries
"What has this guy got?" was
the natural query. "He's the
world's greatest shot-putter,
there's no doubt about that," they
would say, "but have you ever seen
a picture of him? He looks more
like a basketball player."
A basketball player he could well
be, or even an end on a football
team, but never a shot put artist.
Fonville just doesn't look like a
champion weight man and that's
what makes his feats even more
remarkable.
Detroit -Product
The product of Detroit Miller
High sets his 195 pounds on a
slender, but muscular six foot two
inch frame, while Jack Torrance,
whose world mark still holds at 57
feet 1 inch, was well over 250
pounds and had a tremendous
frame to put behind his heaves;
and Al Blozis whose world indoor
mark has just gone by the boards
was a 245 pounder.
Their records were understand-
able-power alone was the key.
But- "What makes this guy Fon-
ville great?"
Here's the Answer
There's no one more capable of
answering that question than his
coach, Wolverine veteran track
mentor Ken Doherty.
"Perfection of form" is the an-
swer, the Michigan coach will give
immediately. There's no doubt
about it in his mind.
He can tell stories of Charlie as
just a "good" high school product,
never having won any major
crowns, who during his freshman
year here developed into one of
Michigan's finest shot put pros-
pects.
Success Formula
Doherty claims that hard work
and long tedious hours of perfect-
ing minute details did the trick.
Patience and fortitude has paid
off.
There's a story they're telling
these days of a series of photos
that were taken of Fonville show-
ing every movement in his flight
across the shot put circle.
In company with his veteran
coach, he closely scrutinized every
motion in search of flaws. The pair
figured out that if he could keep
his left leg down, it would give him
more balance, a more continuous
motion at top speed across the
mark.

. -t
'Matnien
'rhe NCAA wrestling champion-
ship meet scheduled next weekend
at Leheigh University will be by-
1)assed by the Wolverine grapplers,
Coach Cliff Keen announced yes-
terday.
Feeling that academic attend-
ance is more vital for the Michi-
gan wrestlers, Coach Keen stress-
ed the fact, though, that the mat-
men are certainly not finished for
the 1948 season.
The district meet for the Olym-
pic Games slated for April 16th
and 17th at the Detroit downtown
YMCA will garner the Wolver-
ine squad's chief interest for the
next month.
Coach Keen also emphasized
that his Michigan squad will in
no way endanger their chances for
qualifying for the Olympic Games
since the winners of the NCAA
meet will also have to compete
in the qualifying meet at Iowa
State College the 23 and 24 of
April in Ames, Ia.

Exhibition Baseball Results
Detroit 7, Phillies 0. Yankees 4. Cincinnati 3.
Cardinals 8, Red Sox 5. INCOMPLETE
Cubs 7, Browns 1. Pittsburgh N) vs. Hollywood
Washington 7, Athletics 1. Cleveland (A? vs. San Francisco

I

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WOLVERINE RECORD BREAKER ... Charlie Fonville, described
by Track Coach Doherty as "perfection of form."

"-i ,.
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Working on this discovery, Fon-
ville made a conscious effort to
correct the defect. The record
proves that it has paid off.
Many of the qualities that have
made Charlie a great athlete are
reflected in his character.
His likeable, intelligent person-
ality make him one of the easiest
men on the squad to know.
The same kind of hard work and
perfection that have aided him in
throwing the shot has made him a
good student, and he plans to en-
ter dental school upon his gradu-
ation.
All This and Painting, Too
In his two and one half years at
Michigan, Fonville has acquired
an interest in painting which con-
sumes much of his spare time.
He's modest in every sense of the
word. Any discussion of Tor-
rance's record in the past tense
will bring an immediate retort.

Fonville doesn't like to talk
about records at all. "You just
don't think about records," he'll
tell you, "you just throw the thing
as far as you can."
When a shot putter starts
throwing sonsistently in the 55
and 56 foot area, one can't help
but wonder when this marvel of
the field is going to reach his peak.
Fonville himself is completely
silent on this matter. He just isn't
talking. But Ken Doherty has
plenty to say about it.
Doherty Raves
"That boy is still young and he's
improving every day. I can think
of no reason for saying that he's
reached his peak. I think he's go-
ing to keep throwing the shot even
farther."
No one should know better than
Doherty, to whom must go much
of the credit of making Fonville
a world's record holder.

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Big, Nine Title Adds to Hono-rs
Taken By Basketball Mentor

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By ROG GOELZ
A championship in basketball is
new to Michigan cage followers,
but to the manl who has raised the
Wolverine quintet to the Big Nine
title in two years it's an old story.
Coach Ozzie Cowles' first
court championship was won by
the dynamic Michigan mentor's
Rochester, Minnes ota High
school team and since then all
of his teams have been either
champions or close runners-up.
Cowles went from Carleton Col-
lege in Minnesota to Dartmouth,
strangely enough, on the recom-
mendation of the same man,
Fritz Crisler, who brought him to
Michigan after Ozzie's teams had
won seven championships in eight
seasons for the Indians.
At Dartmouth, Cowles' teams
earned the distinction of being
the only one to receive three in-
vitations to participate in the
NCAA basketball championships.
The Indians lost to Wiscon-
sin's Eastern title holders by
one point (51-50) in 1941.
DePaul's mighty 1943 squad

stopped Cowles' quintet in the
1942 play-offs and in the follow-
ing year Dartmouth advanced to
the National finals before bowing
to Stanford.
The background for Cowles' im-
pressive record at Dartmouth was
gained at Carlton College in Min-
nesota where his teams won three
mid-western championships in six
years.
A three letter man in college
sports, Cowles was an all-state
halfback in football at Carlton,
attracted the attention of ma-
jor league scouts in baseball
and was' guard captain on the
basketball quintet averaging 16
points a game.
On Crislgrs recommendation,
Cowles came to Michigan from his
Eastern successes. The Wolverine
football coach and athletic di-
rector, first became associated
with the results of Cowles' coach-
ing ability in his last year as
coach at Princeton when the Wol-
verine cage mentor was directing
the efforts of Carlton in the
middle-thirties.

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As in every other outfit this season,
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Brief little jacket with faring
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So even the ever popular classic jacket
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