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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 14, 1948 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.........__WHX ________________

~LT~AY, M

i

Following are excerpts from
the five prize-winning letters,
as selected by the ]daily senior
editors, in The 'Daily's "If 1
Were Editor" contest which
closed Friday.
* * * I

i

Pens

Jab

at

The

To the Editor:
THE DAILY is a good student
paper. Its trouble is that it is
too much the student paper.
I can see reasons for devoting
the bulk of the editorial page to,
student writings-it makes of the
page a sounding board for student
opinion and a springboard for
student writers. But I seldom read
it. The articles too often stem
from a fund of inexperience-a
wealth of political naivete. I am
capable of that brand of thinking
myself. I prefer to read comments
written by pens better tempered
with experience. In short, I want
more syndicated columnists. Drew
Pearson and Walter Lippman are
my suggestions.
Not only are the comments from
sources that are too local--the
news is plagued by the same limi-
tation. The Daily is the only
newspaper I read. I depend on it
to keep me informed on national

and international happenings. In
stead I get a plethora of colleg
trivia and Ann Arbor addend
about which I don't give a doodl
of beans, and a front page tha
pays only skimpy tribute to hap
penings of world note. Importan
news items are featured-Idon'
deny that. However there are tc
many happenings that overshad
ow the current front page stuf
in both importance and interet
that are completely omitted.
Some typographical errors ar
inevitable in any newspaper.
few are bound to be missed b
the proofreaders. The Dail
however, seems to make a hab
of exceeding its quota of mi
placed lines .. .
With my onions (and criticis.
of them) I present some orchid
The Daily now has a balance tha
it lacked in years gone by. It ha
shown originality in digging u
articles on campus life. One iter
that rates high on my list is th
series that filters worldwide new
through campus channels-name
ly the interpretations of wort
events given by various professor
These comments give the paper

1-
aWinner Asks 'Service'
le To The Editor:
at If I were editor of The Daily I would
1. Make "service to society" the guiding principle of my
at
,t paper. To me this principle is the only basis for true liberalism
and the only means of avoiding a pitfall which The Daily often
- seems to fall into-that of becoming a tool for pressure groups
ff who seem liberal because they want things changed....
st To avoid such a mistake I would
a. Observe the fine distinction between minority group
re ax-grinding and disinterested crusades for needed social change.
A b. Make even more use of the fine resources of professional
y knowledge and judgment found on the University campus.
. Make
it c.. Make the news as complete and accurate as possible'
s- giving the readers a chance to draw their own conclusions...
d. Do more than just allow all sides to be represented in
m the editorial section. I would see Harold E. Evans and the
s. president of the Ralph Neafus Club personally and ask them
at to write parallel editorials. I would publicly urge them and any
as other holders of diametrically opposite views to do this, so that
[p everyone would know of my efforts to print both sides.
m 2. Ask experts to write art, music and drama reviews....
1e 3. Conduct a survey to see whether the space and play
Cis
-_ given to sports news is commensurate with its interest to the
d student body.
s. 4. Revitalize the women's page. The women's section has
a swung from ecstatic burbles about the latest spring frill to a
sterile page of notices. Although this is not necessarily a drop
downward, it isn't progress either. The women's page should
give more consideration to the thousands of students' and Uni-
versity employees' wives who read The Daily, and who would
appreciate ideas on child -rearing, housekeeping and apartment-

pose newspaper. My opinion xs
1 that you should stress campus
dews, and reduce your attempt
o cover world news. You are sell-
igto a youn iidec,-w! i
an older audience which r::od
I ou not because you do a be l
~ob of national coverage thani a
own attitudes or interests. If that Detroit newspaper, but b-cause
is the case, it is natural that they you have something of your own
should plead their cause with fine to offer. Accept that fate. Give
phrases and hotly demand that your second page to world-na
"The Daily gives no real campus tional news. Include on you" fi st
news." But if they really want page only world ncws of sign fi-
The Daily to become some kind cance-of real, personal signifi-
of a polling organization, then cance-to students in college. and
they entertain an idle and im- probably a box bulletin such as
possible dream. The Daily should your present world news at a
never try to adopt a weather vane glance, with the tripe omitted
policy, changing position with the and some of the present brief
winds of opinion and swinging stories reduced to your own form
wild and free in a hopeless attempt of news at a glance column.
to follow the shifting currents of PAGE ONE MAKEUP SHOULD
student sentiment. That is not a BE REVAMPED. Page 1 now is

X

Now,

z~Jitl)ON fra

I

MARY LE TEROOM
F01 ?o 1r Your Conne
SERVING UNTIL 10:30 P.M.
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
323 SouTi STATE - Across from /he Campus

I

policy, it is a fantasy.
The Daily must necessarily
mirror the attitudes and judg-
ment of the staff in the selection
of news stories, the play given
those stories, and the editorial
policy. But the way is always open
for students to win staff positions.
Once on the paper, they must, of
course, exercise judgment. This is
The Daily's present practice-
and it is a. sound one. So, if I
were editor, I would confidently
continue that policy. It is real-
istic and fair. It is a potent an-
swer to those who irresponsibly
or ignorantly raise the cry that
The Daily is in the hands of an
unwise minority-for any student
is a potential member of that
select group.
-Keith McKean.
1320 Wile Court
Willow Run.
To the Editor:
... REVAMP YOUR POLICY,
ACCEPTING YOUR PLACE ASI
A UNIVERSITY NEWSPAPER
AND LEAVING NATIONAL COV-
ERAGE TO OTHER NEWSPA-
PERS. It seems to me you aren't
sure whether you want to be a
school newspaper, or an all-pur-

1'

THE THING FOR SPRING!
dlC/taj e

furnishing..
Mrs.rRupert G. Otto
1443 University Terrace

AND HIS ORCHESTRA

"Ann Arbor's Finest Music"

Phone 2-6675

and IZFA
Preset
JANE EYRE
Also PARE LORENTZ' ''THE CITY"
SUNDAY, March 14 at 3 P.M. and 8:30 P.M.
MONDAY, March 15 at 8:30 P.M.
Admission 50c - Tickets on sale at University fal
KELLOGG AUDITORIUM (Dental School)
PROCEEDS TO JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
TODAY, MONDAY and TUESDAY
A One-Punch Guy-LADD Rough-riding Men .. .
Meets a Two-Man Gal- Heart-stealing Women!
LAMOUR
wi JOSEPH SCHILDKRAUT
Coming "THE LONG NIGHT"
WED.! "MORE THAN A SECRETARY"

sector of considered judgment
that is found in too few period-
icals . . .
-George R. Zuckerman.
1008 Monroe.
To the Editor:
...I for one would like to have
more enlightenment in spheres
other than the political, ad-
mittedly important though that
is today.
Why not regular articles about
the new records, and more ar-
ticles on the current musical
scene and music as an enjoyable
art? How about annotated lists
of records and albums for a basic
collection? If music is something
every well-educated person should
know about, I think it should re-
ceive attention at other times
than when some highly publicized
artist gives a concert.
Why not more news about other
fine arts-painting, sculpture, and
architecture? Photographs of
works of art should be certainly
no less newsworthy in a college
paper than pictures showing the
latest antics of coeds. I believe
that every educated person should
enjoy these arts and that it is
the business of a college news-
paper to increase students' inter-
est in them by reporting fully
on news in the art world.
And literature - couldn't we
have more than one book review
a week? (They publish books on
political topics, too.) Instead of
diluted reports of what some pro-
fessor said at some lecture, why
not articles discussing various
phases of the literary scene?
What about suggesting good ar-
ticles to read in current mag-
azines and listing the books
everyone should read? Of course,
every individual has different
ideas on such lists, but discus-
sion and controversy are what
make lively newspapers .. .
-Humphrey A. Olsen.

To the Editor:
A FEW STUDENTS complain
that The Daily is too much
of this or too little of that. Some
'may be angry merely because
The Daily does not reflect their

+ Classified Advertising +
HELP WANTED TRANSPORTATION
GIRL for counter and fountain work. VETERAN, wife, and baby desire ride
Campus location. Prefer student's to Rochester, N.Y., on or about April
wife. Call 5464. )47 3. Will share expenses and driving.
_____________________ Phone 2-8382. )42
MAGAZINE WRITER who can produce - n_ _ ._)42
lucid, imaginative rewrites on popu- WILL SHARE expenses and driving for
lar science and health. Small, na- transportation to or near Souix City,
tional publication has long-range Iowa-on or near April 3, 2-6582. )60
program of part-time assignments
with remuneration for competent WANTED TO RENT
worker. Please cite qualifications in
full, and available time per week. TIP US OFP on your apartment if you,
Box 72, care of Michigan Daily. )62 expect to leave in June. Quiet couple.
both grad students, need furnished
POSITION WANTED apt.in Jun. Po slble3 yr. occu-
pancy. Thanks. Write Box 67, Michi-
gan Daily. )6
GIRL Grad Student interested in work-
ing for room and evening meal begin- LAWYER and wife desire furnished
ning summer session or possibly this or unfurnished house or apartment.
semester. Preferably near campus. Clean, comfortable and convenient
Write Box 71, Michigan Daily. )52 to law school. Two year lease starting
June 15. Phone 25-9423. )85
VET, 27, with educational, commercial
writing, and musical background, MALE STUDENT to share attractive
B.A. 1942, seeks full time job. Write suite 11 blocks from Angell Hall.
Box 69, Michigan Daily. )39 515 East Jefferson, 2-2945. )64
FOR RENT WANTED
EXCELLENT business opportunity for WANTED-Ride to Colorado for Spring
EXCELEN busnes oportuityfor Vacation, and return. Share driving
registered pharmacist. Newly built and expense. Telephone 6284 after 6.
store complete with modern fixtures. )57
Will rent on percentage basis. Grow-_
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1431 East Michigan, Ypsilanti. )53 school year basis if possible.rCan
place 15-20 men if you have room.
BUSINESS SERVICES We'll guarantee the rent. Call 2-
2205 any evening. )23
TYPING: Theses, term papers, ad-
dresses. Duplicating: notices, form WANTED-Two, three or four-drawer
letress. cA2g: Tngesfrv- filing cabinet. Call Donald Pelz days.
etter,208 Nickel arade, Ph. 9811. ) 31511 ext. 589, evenings and week-
ice,_208_NickelsArcade,_Ph._9811._)28_ ends. 2-7603. )82
THINK OF HILDEGARDE'S when you
think of spring. Let us give your last 35 mm. or Bantam frosted glass slid-
year's wardrobe that new look. Alter- ing back adapter. 2 -3i4camera.
ations a specialty rith prompt serv- Phone 7252 after 5 p.m. )15
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Hildegarde Shop, 109 East Washing-_F_ RSALE
ton, Telephone 2-4669. )87 MIDNIGHT BLUE TAILS, 42 long. Worn
LOST AND FOUND four times, $35. Call 25-9299. )46
FOR SALE: A Royal portable typewrit-
LOST: Attention girls at Acacia House er with French and German accents,
last Saturday night, March 6. Do $50. Call 2-0877. )32
your stadium boots match? If not,
write Marjie Hawthorne, 1864 Textile 1939 Chev. Sedan, good condition, rea-
Rd. I have one of your boots. )61 sonable price. After five daily at
1218 Malden Court, Willow Run. )55
LOST: Brown pigskin gloves misplaced,
Thursday, vicinity West Engineering. FULL DRESS SUIT, size 39 and acces-
I'm freezing! Seen them? Norm sories. Shirt size 15%. Good con-
Steere, 7330. )59 dition. Phone 2-8402. )45
LOST-Slide Rule one State Street, CANARIES, parrakeets, bird supplies
Thursday. Finder please call 2-6675. and cages also Apex radio and Silver-
)54 tone radio-phonograph. 562 South
Seventh, corner Madison. Ph. 5330. )8
MAN'S Elgin Wristwatch back of Haven
Hall. Finder please return to Room 1, WOODSTOCK Standard Typewriter-
University Hall. )58 good condition, $27.50. Collapsible
baby buggy, $11; Small kerosene cook
LOST - Red manila envelope, 8%~x1l, stove, $4. 912 Heath Court, Willow
containing papers. Reward. Write Village )51
Daily, Box 70. )50
REWARD for return of waterproof SACRIFICE SALE! Radios. Spartan
watch. "H. W. Beattie & Son" on dial. Console, $30. Emerson Table model,
Name on back. )56 $15. Philco Portable, $12. 422 E.
Washington, Ken Bissell after 7 p.m.
LOST: On Monday, a black Parker 51 )43
pencil. Lost between Angell Hall and
Jordan. Sentimental value. Reward. SPORT COAT, gray green, 39 long.
Call 2-4561-379. )41 Tailored by De Pinna, 5th Ave. Worn
3 times; like new .Originally $80;
LOST: Wedding present from hus- now $25. Contact Room M-41, Law-
band. Long single strand individually yer's Club. )44
knotted pearls night of Michigan-
Iowa game in Field House or on State RALEIGH 3-SPEED BIKE, enclosed
or Arch Street. Please contact 2-1828. drive. '47 model, cost $85.00 Sell for
Reward. )49 $70.00. Call 2-0504. )63
I :-

regularly a crazy quilt. You pub-
lish too many too short stories
on page on. If the stories are
that small, they don't merit a
headline: Group them together
under some general heading, such
as "News of the Day," "Names in
the News," or what have you.
Page 1 should be given a pattern
which should be used with reason-
able variation but with enough of
a fixed pattern so that the reader
can guess, for example, that col-
umn one will be the dull but
important administrative ruling,
column four and eight will carry
other big and more interesting
stories; that double column heads
usually mean feature stuff
-Stanley G. Harris,
17 Veterans' Housing Project.
Plstie..
(Continued from Page 1)
covering all of Palestine and with
spies in outlying Arab countries.j
These espionage groups are made
up of former Stern gang members
who are working with, but not un-
der, the Hagana.
"100,000 Jews in time not spent
at their work, are guarding the
borders to Palestine," Ingber said.
IHagana has established road
blocks, filling oil drums with ce-
ment and leaving room for one
car to pass so as to check Arab
infiltration.
The Hagana brings in refugees,
gives them food, clothing, quar-
ters and a place to work, all this
with opposition from the British,
Ingber noted.
The Hagana is well equipped
with small arms, some of which
they manufacture themselves, but
they have no big weapons.
They need American help, Ing-
ber said. Money is not enough.
"They will go on fighting because
they have an irrepressible desire
to settle and live peacefully in
their own country."
The Jews in Palestine do not
look like an oppressed minority,
he said.
British soldiers are very cau-
tious about going around in the
cities, Mr. Ingber said. They are
frightened.
Ingber spoke to several refugees
from Russia and said that they
didn't like the USSR. They talked
of fear, propaganda and graft in-
side Russia.
Ingber said, however, that the
Jews in Palestine hate the British
with such fervor, that they will
go to any lengths to get their
independence.
TGDCAY
at REGULAR PRICES

~,eme 1I 9 ? e477ihf 1hH 4f6op!
DANCING EVERY NicalT
(Except Monday)
SODA BAR, HAMBURGERS
SANDWICHES
DINNER 5 to 7 P.M.
DANCING 7:30 to 12
338 Maynard Street
"JUST BEHIND ARCADE"

i
4

1,

You can run a classified ad in the
Doily . . . on a lineage basis! That
means your ad will probably cost you
less. But the results will be as great
as ever. The lineage basis is some-
thing NEW! Try it.
You can place your ad at the Daily
office . . . before 3 P.M. each after-
noon. You can walk away expecting
RESULTS.
MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED DEP'T.

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