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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 11, 1948 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

POOR AMMUNITION:
Eat Green Tomatoes, Leaves
For Vitamins, Says Botaniist

By IVAN KELLEY
When you eat a ripe tomato in-
stead of the leaves of the tomato
plant you are being about as logi-
cal as the slapstick comedian who
eats the wrapper and throws away
the candy bar.
This is one of the conclusions
to be drawn from the vitamin re-
search of Prof. Felix G. Gustafson
of the botany department.
Prof. Gustafson has found that
the concentration of vitamins B2
and B2 in the leaves of the toma-

Damsel.

(Continued from Page 1)
well if they get worms and frogs
to dissect," Nadine explained.I
"The best tiey ever have is a rat
or rabbit."1
The young deer that's doomed
to dissection is one of many who
starve each year during the .spring
thaw. Anticipating these multi-
ple deaths, Detroit newspapers
send their cameramen up to Hig-
gins Lake each year to get gory
pictures of the dying deer.
According to Miss Literaty, "The
conservation officers spend their
free time for several weeks tearing
around the woods finding dead
deer for Detroit reporters."

to is more than twice as great as
it is in the fruit. His research has
shown further that the vitamin
content of green fruit is greater
than that of ripe fruit and that
young, growing leaves are endowed
with more vitamins than old
leaves.
Sheds Light
From a study of these phenom-
ena Prof. Gustafson has concluded
that vitamins are produced in the
growing leaves and that they dif-
fuse from the leaves to the other
parts of the plant, including the
fruit. His research has thrown
light on the process of vitamin
production as well as showing the
location in which the process takes
place.
In one of Prof. Gustafson's ex-
periments some plants were grown
in light varying from very bright
to very dim and other plants were
grown in complete darkness.
Progressively Richer
He found that the plants be-
came progressively richer in vita-
mins as the light intensity was in-
creased and that the plants
grown in darkness were poorest,
of all in vitamins. From this he
concludes that vitamin production
depends very heavily on the ef-
fect of sunlight and that the proc-
ess is probably connected in some
way with photosynthesis.
Regarding the comparative vita-.
min content of tomatoes and to-
mato leaves, Prof. Gustafson con-
cludes that "You can hardly ex-
pect people to eat green tomo-
toes or tomato leaves but they
would be getting more vitamin B1
and B2 if they did."
Delta Tau Delta Officers
Newly-elected officers of Delta
Tau Delta, national social frater-
nity, are Joe Wimsatt, president;
Jack Lee, vice-president; George
Carruthers, treasurer; Dick Bohl,
recording secretary and Bob Hig-
bee, corresponding secretary.

POLICEMAN 'POP' TO EVICTED CHILDREN-Lieut. Patrick Welsh tucks four homeless children
into a police station cot at Pawtucket, R.I., af er their mother, Mrs. Joseph Grimes, walked into
the station distraught after a three-months search for a home. Four other children have lived
with relatives since the family was evicted from their home last December. Children are (left
to right): Emily, six; Ann, 18 months; Patricia, four, and Trudy, two.

Campus
Calendar
Young Republicans-wrganiza-
tional meeting, 7:15 p.m. Union
Terrace.
Young Democrats -- elections,
address by publicity director of
Democratic State Central Com-
mittee; 7:30 p.m. Henderson Room
League.
Forester's Club-Speaker, Stan-
ley G. Fontanna; 7:30 p.m. 2082
Natural Science.
V-2 Rockets Lecture -"2
Rockets in the United States,"
Prof. W. G. Dow; 8 p.m. Rm. 304
Union.
Spanish Lecture - "Quiroga,
Municipio Michoacano," Prof.
Donald D. Brand; 8 p.m. Room D,
Alumni Memorial Hall.
French Lecture-"La situation
politique en France aujour -
d'hui," Dr. Lucien Wolff; 4:15
p.m. Rackham Amphitheatre.
Latin American Lecture - "A
Trip Across Mexico on the Pan-
American Highway," Juan Fran-
yutti; 8 p.m. Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
Student Chapel - meditation
service, 7:30 a.m., League chapel.
Westminister Coffee Flour-3:30
p.m., Presbyterian Church.
Opera - "Dido and Aeneas,"
.'The Telephone," 8 p.m. Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Student Faculty Tea-Romance
Language Department, 4 p.m.,
Russian Tea Room of the League.
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes
Sold,
Bought,
Rented,
Repaired
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St.
G. L Requisitions Accepted

Views of Masaryk's Death

(Continued from Page 1)
Under the "hazy" circumsta -
ces, it is impossible to tell wtmt
Masaryk's death might bring
about, Dr. Manfred C. Vernon, of
the political science department,
declared, and added that it was
possible his death was "not vol-
untary."
At the same time, Abbott Simon,
a representative of the National
Council for American-Soviet
friendship, told The Daily that the
entire situation was "misunder-
stood" by the American people.
Simon was in Ann Arbor yes-
terday to discuss the success of

various council campaigns with
officers of MYDA and the Ralph
Neafus Club, local Communist
Party organ.
He said that if Masaryk killed
himself for political reasons, it was
probably because "he, as spokes-
man of the liberal west, had been
betrayed once again by the West-
ern Powers."
The murder possibility was dis-
missed by Simon as "definitely not
possible."
Memorial services for Masaryk,
who was active in Unitarian
Church work, will be held at 10:30
a.m., Sunday by Rev. Edward H.
Redman, at the Unitarian Church.

4

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"Home of 3-Hour
Odorless Dry Cleaning"
\'CLLAN ERS
630 South Ashley
Phone 4700

LeaueMixer
Will Be Held
Vocalist Jackie Ward will be
featured with Tom McNall's five
piece band at the League Mixer
Dance 2 to 5 p.m. Saturday in the
League Ballroom, Blanche Berger,
chairman of League Dances, an-
nounced yesterday.
The League Dances, which are
planned for every other week in
the future, have been warmly re-
ceived in the past, Miss Berger
pointed out. Here, unattached stu-'
dents have an excellent oppor-
tunity to meet other students of
the opposite sex.
For those who care to indulge,
soft drinks and card playing will
be available.
Rev. Hill To Talk
On Civil Liberties
The Reverend Charles Hill, Bap-
tist minister from Detroit, will
speak on "Civil Liberties in '48"
at 7:30 Sunday at the Hillel foun-
dation.
A "supernar," combination sup-
per and discussion, will be at 63
p.m. Reverend Hill's talk is open
to the public and reservations are
being accepted today for the sup-
per. Those wishing to make reser-
vations should call 2-6585.

I 11E1 ANt) IEUARN

Opportunity 'JIo Study Abroad'
Offered American Students

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first in
a series of artices on going to school
in Europe.)
By DOLORES PALANKER
Now is the time when a student's
fancy turns more earnestly to-
wards what he's been thinking
about for the last semester and a
half-what to do this summer.
If you have the time, the ambi-
tion to learn as well as enjoy your-
self, and-a minor detail---money,
why not go abroad to study at one
of the several universities offering
courses to American students.
Several British colleges and uni-
versities have opened their doors
to 600 Americans who will not only
gain full credit for their studies
but may also apply for scholar-
ships. The colleges and their
fields of concentration are: Ox-
ford, European Civilization in the
20th Century; University of Lon-
don, Contemporary English Liter-
ature; St. Andrew's in Scotland,
Tradition of European Civiliza-
tion.
More Open Doors
The list continues with Birm-
ingham, Shakespeare and Eliza-
bethan Drama; Leeds, Britain's
Economic Future; Nottingham,
Education in England; Southamp-

oil i

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A REAL CREATION
Exhibit of Silver and Copper JEWELRY
in the ABSTRACT Manner shown Exclusively at
Kejpje1' s Il'ainlcr al t 1Mart
802 South State Street-Near Hill
Just a few steps south of campus

ton, Historical and Sociological
Survey of Contemporary Britain;j
and a special four-week course in
medical and scientific studies to be
offered by the Medical School of
the University of Birmingham.
All students who wish to attend
the English universities must send
their applications to the Insti-
tute of International Educational,
2 West 45th St., New York City,
before March 15. Application
blanks may be obtained at the of-
fices of the English, sociology and
history departments of the Uni-
versity.
Practically FrE o
Attendance at one of these sum-
mer sessicns would cost the indi-
vidual no more than $600 includ-
ing travel expenses, room and
board.
Universities in France which
Americans may attend at a not
much greater cost are offering
courses in French cultuire and civ-
ilization. They include: Aix-Mar-
seille, College International de
Cannes, Besancon; Bordeaux, to
be held at Pau; Caen; Dijon;
Grenoble; and Montpellier.
Additional universities are: Par-
is; Alliance Francaise, 11 Boule-
vard Raspail, Paris VIe; Poitiers,
Institut de Touraine, to be held at
Tours; Rennes, to be held at
Saint- Malo: and Royaumont,
Centre Culturel International de
Royaumont.
The Universit y or Fontainebleau
iS conduct inp- courses in music and
fine arts and the University of
Strasbourg courses in German and
French.
Most of these schools can be
contacted directly or through the

MUSICAL
SUPPLIES
REEDS - STRINGS
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MUSICAL REPAIR
209 E. Washington Ph. 8132

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International Edu-

VETS CHECKS
Checks being held for Uie fol-
lowing veterans at the Ann Arbor
Post, Office will be returned to Co-
lumbus March 15: Harry Apoian,
Bruce Douglas Carey, Richard J.
Dobson, James Albert Downes,
Demesthenes G. Efthemiou, Har-
old Greenberg, Clinton U. Haas,
Mark N. Haller Jr., John H. Hoke,
Harold G. Kretchmar, John H.
Lyngklip, James N. Malina, Earl
M. Masson, Emanuel Rose, Otho
Robinson, Ralph C. Smith, Frank
A. Straub, John I1I. Tallett and
James E. Wilson.
Call for Entertainers
Student entertainers who are
interested in appearing in Spring
Varnity Night should call Ext.
2114, Harris Hall for audition ap-
ponitments.
Spring Varsity Night is spon-
sored by the University bands and
the proceeds are to be used for
a scholarship fund for deserving
bandsmen.

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