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March 09, 1948 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-03-09

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TuiEMIChIGANlDAiLY __

BETTER CITIZENS:
Michigan Children's Institute
Cares for Dependent Children

GOOD GRADES HELP:
VA Survey Discloses Keys
To Success in iMedical School

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first
of two articles explaining the prob-
lems and functions of the Michigan
Children's Institute, 1447 Washing-
ton Hgts, Ann Arbor.)
By ANNETTE RICA
Daily Special Writer
"We have grown out of the idea
that all orphans should be taken
care of in an orphanage," declared
Mr. Albert E. Ball, supervisor of
the Michigan Children's Institute.
The institute, resulting from
state planning for the care of
children who would ordinarily be
in an orphanage, is the outgrowth
of the Michigan State Orphanage.
,It supervises the placing of chil-
dren in foster homes.
Main Task
Its main task is to help depend-
ent children develop into good
citizens. This state was one of
the first in the country to set up
such an organization.
An outgrowth of the Menture
system (placing out of children
goes back to 15th century England,
when children were bound to a
family and given a minimum
amount of clothes and education)
YPCM Hears
Tallk Tonight
The legal implications of the de-
tention of four alleged Communist
aliens at Ellis Island will be dis-
cussed by Jerry McCroskey, chair-
man at the University chapter of
the National Lawyers Guild, at
tonight's meeting of the campus
Young Progressive Citizens of
Michigan, at 7:30 p.m. in the Un-
ion.
The confinement without bail
of the four while awaiting depor-
tation proceedings has aroused
heated controversy over the le-
gality of the action. On Saturday
the four were finally released on
bail after a six day hunger strike
in protest against Attorney Gen-
eral Tom Clark's previous refusal
to grant them bail.
The alleged Communists, who
are charged with advocating the
overthrow of the United States
Government, are Gerhart Eisler,
reputed to be top man in the
Communist Party in this country;
John Williamson, labor secretary
of the Communist Party; Ferdi-
nand C. Smith, secretary of the
National Maritime Union, CIO,
and Charles A. Doyle, vice presi-
dent of the United Gas, Coke and
Chemical Workers, CIO.
Read The Daily
Classifreds
JUST INITIATED?
It's a Michigan tradition to
order a Nassau personalized beer
mug at BALFOURS with your
fraternity coat of arms, year, and
nickname.
Only Nassau has the secret of
firing the decoration into the
mug so that it can never wear
off, and Nassau mugs are dis-
tributed exclusvely by the Bal-
four Company.
Be sure you get the original,
traditonal Nassau mug. Special
discounts for group orders of six
or more.
Tom and Meredith Suckling
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 8 University Phone 9533

6
1
t
a
t

the Michigan Children's Institute
has its headquarters in Ann Ar-
bor, close to University Hospital
and various psychological clinics.
The building was occupied in 1939.
Temporary Home
A few children are cared for in
the Receiving Home, which holds,
a maximum of 17 children. It is
carefully designed and used only
for a temporary home in which to
study the children. This home is
also used for children vwio are tak-
ing medical treatment over a pe-
riod of time.
More boys than girls are com-
mitted to the Receiving Home.

Lend an ear and leave off dis-
sectin tht cat you would-be
medicos, tihe keyto success in
medical school ls justbeen re-
vealed.
A recent survey released by the
Veterans Administration discloses
that student veterans are more
likely to complete their medical
training successfully if they are
enrolled in tie medical school at
ISA Offers
Exotic Fare
To Students

Preschool children are sent di-
rectly to foster parents.
Hospital School
The average stay is 4 months,
during which time the children at-
tend the University Hospit al
School. The home has its own
psychologist and psychiatrist, and
several recreational workers. It is
well-equipped, with a carpentry
shop in the basement. Every child
is given a few chores. The average
cost to the state is $1.50 a day.
"We receive children from all
over the state, committed to us
primarily by the probate courts.
They may be referred to us
through a social agency, neighbors,
friends and relatives, sometimes
by the family themselves. We ac-
cept many babies of unmarried
mothers. We become the legal
guardian of the children," Mr. Ball
added.
Broken Homes
Few of the children are orphans
who have lost both parents. Most'
of them come from broken and in-
adequate homes.
It costs half as much to keep a
child under thisaprogram as in the
vocational schools. It is better to
study the child and the home, to
match the two together, than to
make hasty plans for a child and
have them go awry, Dr. Ball de-
clared.
1200 Children
The Institute is caring for 1200
children who are in foster homes.
An additional 800 are wards but
are supervised in their own locali-
ties by social agencies and agents
of the Probate Court, he contin-
ued.
"An example of our work is the
case of a little girl whose mother
is an epileptic and who has a psy-
chotic family history. We find a
home for her. If she gets along,
she has a good chance of adoption.
Then child then shows a nor-
mal mentality and personality,"
Dr. Ball pointed out.

the same institution where they
did their undergraduate work.
Good Grades Help
It was also found, strangely
enough, that good grades, in the
form of a "B" average or better
will contribute materially to suc-
cess. Particular emphasis in this
respect is laid upon natural sci-
ences.
The importance of the "B" aver-
age is indicated by the fact that
in one medical school surveyed,
99 per cent of all failures during
a ten-year period consisted of stu-
dents whose pre-medical grades
averaged below "B" plus.
Quality Not Quantity
Another survey conducted over
a ten-year period showed that the
average grade for medical stu-
dents during the first three years
of the course was about 6.11 per
cent points below their premedical
averages. On the basis of this
survey, it would seem that a vet-
eran with only average premedical
grades has a slim chance of wea-
thering the rough grind in medi-
cal school.
In predicting the likelihood of
success on the basis of grades
made in natural science, the sur-
vey emphasized the quality of
training rather than the number
of courses taken.
With that in mind you had best
get back to the cat and pass that
zoology exam.
"

Do you like Fren('h cuisine
Chinese cooking?

or

ROYAL SUSPENSE-Ex-King Michael of Rumania smiles for the
camera. Possibly he is considering the $1,000 a week offer of the
Detroit Civic Light Opera company to sing the lead role in
Sigmund Romberg's "The Desert Song." Opera Company officials
based their choice on the report of amature theatrics that the
handsome monarch indulged in, in Switzerland.
MANY MISS MESS:
Men on Time for Breakfast
While Women Snooze, .diet

By HERB MADALIN
Are women naturally more lazy
than men, or are men just more
ravenous eaters?
This question was brought up
recently when a check on the
breakfast eating habits of men
and women livingdin University
dormitories showed that while
three-fourths of the men ate
breakfast in the dorms during
week ,days, only two-thirds of the
'women were able to get up enough
.ambition to eat in the wee hours of
the morning.
Student Opinion
Various shades of student opin-
ion were found in regard to the
reasons for this difference of fig-
ures.
Peggy Martin, '49, although not
living in a dorm herself, admitted
that this may be due to two char-
acteristics which the male usually
associates with women-that is:
(1) They are frequently on a diet
or (2) They can't make up their
minds.
Miss Martin explained that
many girls may lie in bed, unable
to decide whether to get up and
eat or get a few minutes more of

"needed sleep." By the time their
mind is made up, it is too late to
eat breakfast. She vehemently de-
nied the insunuation that women
might be'more lazy than men.
West Quadder
Bill Matheson, '51, who lives in
the West Quad, said he believed
the main trouble was that it took
women a longer time to get pre-
sentable to go to breakfast. He said
that by the time they are ready to
eat, it is too late for them to do
so.
Matheson, however, opined that
breakfast is a vulgar invention,
and that he enjoyed his sleep more
than this meal. "A cigarette is
enoumgh to carry me over until
dinner," he remarked.
'U' Dieticians
Miss Kathleen Hamm, Univer-
sity dietician, in urging students
to eat breakfast, pointed out that:
(1) Industrial and school studies
show a result of greater efficiency
during the morning if breakfast is
eaten.
(2) An individual is more apt to
get daily food requirements if eat-
ing three meals a day instead of
two.

. . . ...... ... . ... . .. .. ...

I1

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

1

WANTED
WANTED-Two, three or four-drawer
filing cabinet. Call Donald Pelz days.
31511 ext. 589, evenings and week-
ends. 2-7603. )82
WANTED: High School student or
coed. Will exchange board and room
for part-time housework, Write Box
65, Michigan Daily. )64
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED: 2 passengers to vicinity of
Sioux Falls, South Dakota, driving
afternoon April 2 return April 11. Call
2-7438. )20
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
STUDENTS: Easy cash. One or more
students to buy vending machine
business. No license required. Call
6417 after 5. )14

FOR RENT
ONE-HALF OF A DOUBLE ROOM for
male student. Phone 2-1018. )22
PLEASANT SINGLE ROOM. Men only.
Telephone 5728. )10
WANTED: Male student to share suite
with Christian student, near Uni-
versity Hospital. Call 6637. )17
BUSINESS SERVICES
DRESSMAKING - Suits and Dresses -
Specializing with Vogue - Altera-
tions - Call for appointment. Mrs.
L. Ringinen, 2-2604. )91
THINK OF HILDEGARDE'S when you
think of spring. Let us give your last
year's wardrobe that new look. Alter-
ations a specialty with prompt serv-
ice. Custom clothes and re-styling.
Hildegarde Shop, 109 East Washing-
ton, Telephone 2-4669. )87
WANTED TO RENT
3 or 4 BEDROOM furnished house by
May 1 or 15. Call Northville 322ecol-
lect. ) 48
WANTED TO RENT: Garage, 2 mos.
Call 2-3225. Susan Tabibian. )12
APARTMENT wanted as soon as pos-
sible. Grad student-veteran and wife.
Quiet, considerate. Contact Al Gross,
1120 S. Forest, Ph. 9431 )

f

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Strand of pearls on campus-
Sentimental value. Finder call Lil-
lian Bartlett, 9158. )5
LOST: Kappa Sigma fraternity pin.
Reward. Please call 8612. )19
LOST-Sunburst style pin. Set with
pearls on gold backing. Barbour Gym
and W.A.B. )1
AMYTHEST Ring-Lost J-Hop weekend.
Sentimental value. Reward, Call Cork
at 3-1511, ext. 2147. )2
PEARLS LOST Sunday. Single strand,
screw clasp. Vicinity campus Drug,
St. Andrew's Church, Old German
Restaurant or iYellow cab. Family
heirloom. PLEASE call V. Parrish,
4489. Reward. )11
FOR SALE
FOR SALE - Radio. Brewster Table
Model. 5-Tube. Practically new. $22.50.
Call 4736 after 6 p.m. )63
FOR SALE: Portable typewriter. New
condition. Corona sterling model.
Cost $90. Sell for $74. Call Pete 6226
after 7 p.m. )16
FOR SALE: Size 36 tails. E. Allen
Freiwald. Phone 2-0249. 1601 Wash-
tenaw. )13
35 mm. or Bantam frosted glass slid-
ing back adapter. 2%-3% camera.
Phone 7252 after 5 p.m. )15
ELECTRIC RAZORS, blue suit, macki-
naw, ski pants, sport coat, 10% shoes,
shirts. Phone 2-0278 after, 9 p.m. )7
TYPEWRITER, Monarch portable, de-
luxe, excellent working condition $40.
See at 430 Cross evenings. )18
TWO SHEER DRESSES, two coats, suits
and cottons, size 12. One lady's bicy-
cle reasonably priced. Call 2-1201
for appointment. )21
NEW TAILS-$70 new, now $50. Two
new drape sport coats, 38L. New $40
each, now $25. Phone Ralph, 2-7639.
) 65
CANARIES, parrakeets, bird supplies
and cages also Apex radio and Silver-
tone radio-phonograph combination,
562 South Seventh, corner Madison.
Phone 5330. ) 8
FOR SALE-Everhot Rangette with two
burners, broiler and oven, $30.00. AC-
DC radio-phonograph, $25.00; apart-
ment washing machine and wringer,
$20.00. 1069 Goshen Court, Willow
Village. Ypsi 3596W13. )

Food served with that cosmo-
politan flair can be had every oth-
er Sunday night at the Interna-
tional Center, when the various
foreign student clubs display thei
culinary talent.
The clubs take turns presenting
dinners which are co-sponsored by
the Center and the International
Students Association. Members
make all the preparation and do
the cooking themselves, trying to
feature a national dish.
Tie Flench supper last Sunday,
was a sell-out, perhaps because the
menu listed, among other things,
such delicacies as ham, eggs "mi-
mosa," special French salad, and
Camembert cheese and crackers.
Served in the recreation room at
the Center, the meal was pro-
nounced a complete success by the
guests.
These "adventures in good eat-
ing" are a regular part of the ISA
program. Tickets for them may be
purchased at the Center during
the early part of the week pre-
ceding a "foreign supper."
Other suppers planned for this
semester include a Chinese meal
on March 21; a Turkish meal,
April 18; a Polish or Indian sup-
per, May 9; and an Arab supper,
May 23.
Service Group
Takes Pledc es
Organization Assists
In Student Affairs
The University's chapter of
Alpha Phi Omega, the national
service fraternity is accepting
pledges at their meeting at the
Union this Thursday.
Alpha Phi Omega members are
the ones who act as 'watchers"
in University elections, straighten
out bewildered freshmen during
registration and work actively on
"tag" days. Believing that small
things count, they make regular
Health Service visits to cheer up
sick students, making sure they
get their letters from home.
The basic requirement for mem-
bership is an interest in commun-
ity affairs, work which frequently
is done in conjunction with the
Office of Student Affairs.
The fraternity's newly elected
officers are Louis Horton, pres-
ident, George Meyer, vice-presi-
dent and Dick White, secretary.
Ornithologist
Gets the Bird
Making its virgin flight through
the Arboretum Saturday, a bald
eagle became the first of its species
to be seen in inland Michigan.
By mere chance, Prof. Harry
Hann's ornithology class was at
the same time passing through the
Arb looking for birds. Sharp-eyed
student Florence Olson spotted the
half-dollar decoration as it flew
near, and asked in wonderment,
"Isn't that an eagle?"
Prof. Hann identified the bird
as a bald eagle, the largest mem-
ber of the hawk family. Though
seen occasionally around the
Great Lakes, the eagle had shaken
precedent by coming west from
Lake Erie along the Huron River.
When last seen, this bird was
flying east along the river. It is
not dangerous to anything but
fish.
Senior Class Dues
Seniors in the literary college

wvill have an opportunity to pay
their class dues at a booth from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursday in
University Hall.

Student veterans who acquire
dependents while enrolled in
school under the G.I. Bill as single
persons should notify the Veter-
ans Administration without delay
so that an adjustment may be
made in their subsistence pay-
ments.
Numerous cases have been re-
ported by the VA of veterans who
have married but neglected to
notify VA until several months
later, thereby losing the increased
allowance due to them in the in-
terim. Payments are increased as
of the date of notification and
not retroactively to the date a de-
$endent is acquired.
* * *
Veterans are prohibited from
receiving subsistence allowances
and readjustment payments (52-
20) for the same period, Veterans
Administration officials warned.
Only veterans actively seeking
work and willing to accept suit-
able employment may legally re-
ceive unemployment benefits for
a period during which they receive
no educational or training bene-
fits. Concurrent receipt of both
payments is a violation of the law
and subjects the veteran to prose-
cution.
Bonus payments to 562,746
Michigan veterans of World War
II amount to a total of $203,307,-
930, according to the Adjutant
General's Office, an Associated
Press report said.
Fewer than 30,000 claims remain
to be investigated and approved
the office said. About 75,000 claims
have been returned for correction
and 1,599 claims rejected, the re-
port added.
Payment to each veteran has
averaged $361.
Veterans whose claims have
been delayed were warned by the
Adjutant General to write a letter
of inquiry, rather than file a sec-
ond claim. The latter it was said,
places the veteran in the position
of making a fraudulent state-
ment.
Bands To Present
New Variety Night
A new campus event, Spring
Varsity Night, sponsored by the
University Bands, will make its
debut at 8:30 p.m. March 24 in
Hill Auditorium.
The program will feature both
local and professional talent in a
variety show similar to the tra-
ditional fall Varsity Night.
The band has issued a call for
a limited number of student en-
tertainers. All kinds of novelty and
variety acts, musical, dancing, and
vaudeville -type are welcome.
Those interested may make ap-
pointments by calling Ext. 2114,
Harris Hall.
The purpose of Spring Varsity
Night is to provide a scholarship
fund for band members with out-
standing scholarship and unusual
musical ability.

PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
IN STOCK
Coronas - Underwoods
Remingtons
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
SERVICE CO.
111 South 4th Ave.

S. J. HOLMES
... his book published
* * *
Prof. Holmes
Writes Book
"Life and Morals," a new book
which analyzes present day eco-
nomic and social problems from
the biological and scientific point
of view, has been published by
Prof. S. J. Holmes, a former mem-
ber of the University zoology de-
partment.
The book treats the modern na-
tion as a new kind of organism
which has developed a good many
internal disorders that will re-
quire much doctoring to enable it
to function well.
Holmes is also the author of
some dozen books dealing with the
subjects of animal intelligence, be-
havior and biology, racial evolu-
tionary trends, human penticis,
sociology, and education.
He taught zoology at Michigan
from 1899 to 1905, and has been a
Professor Emeritus of Zoology at
the University of California since
1917.
r h

Have you been looking for a champion of
INDUSTRIAL DEMOCRACY
among the nation's political parties?
Then acquaint yourself with the ob.jectives of the
Socialist Labor Party of America.
Attend the-study class now being conducted
Wednesday evenings at 8:00 P.M.
Third floor, Masonic Temple, 327 S. Fourth Ave.
Ann Arbor, Michigan

MfleerL Finale
Will Feature
Brailowsky
Alexander Brailowsky, Russian
pianist. will p'esent the fifth and
last concert in the University Mu-
sical Society's Extra Concert Se-
,ies at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow at. Hill
Auditorium.
Beethoven's "Appassionata" So-
nata in F minor will be featured in
the concert, which opens with the
Busoni arrangement of Bach's
Toccata and Fugue in D minor,
and Scarlatti's Sonata in A ma-
j 0ti.
A selection of Chopin pieces will
follow, including: Fanatsy-Im-
promptu; Ballade in G minor:
Nocturne on F slarp major; Waltz
in E flat major; and Polonaise in
A flat major.
After an intermission. Brailow-
sky will play: La plus que lente 1 '
Debussy; Ravel's Toccata;tIm-
promptu in F minor by Faure; and
Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsody No. 6.
Tickets for the concert are on
sale at the offices of the Univer-
sity Musical Society in Burton
Tower.
Brailowsky won distinction as an
interpreter of Chopin recently
when he presented his famous
Chopin cycle of six concerts in one
season.
current
O N S AVIN G S
...insured to $5,000.
Any amount opens
your account at
ANN ARBOR
FEDERAL
Savings and Loan Awsn.
116 N. Fourth Avenue
Opposite the Assets Over
Court House$L.014

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LENDING LIBRARY

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14 Nickels Arcade
Phone 4326

TIP US OFF on your apartment if you
expect to leave in June. Quiet couple,
both grad students, need furnished
apt. in June. Possible 3 yr. occu-
pancy. Thanks. Write Box 67, Michi-
gan Daily. )6
LAWYER and wife desire furnished
or unfurnished house or apartment.
Clean, comfortable and convenient
to law school. Two year lease starting
June 15. Phone 25-9423. )85

1

i

ContinuoLjs
Daily
from 1 p.m.

n

Weekdays
35c to 5 P.M.

NOW PLAYING

""""""""

I

.

OPENING TOMORROW 8 P.M.
The DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH and the SCHOOL OF MUSIC present
A DOUBLE BILL OF OPERA

"DIDO AND AENEAS"
by HENRY PURCELL
and
"THE TELEPHONE"
by Gian-Carlo Menotti

R

1

MICHIGAN

Note Time Schedule

I

yE ROMANTIC ADVENTURE!

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MArWTCilWA "1 A r 1

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