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February 26, 1948 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1948-02-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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PAGE I

GEZUNDHEIT!
Hayfever Heritage Should Be
Considered Before Marriage

By SHEILA MILLMAN
If you are contemplating mar-
riage, you had better find out if
your prospective mate has hay-
fever, for according to Dr. Buena-
ventura Jimenez of the allergy
clinic at Health Service, the ten-
dency to allergy is inherited.
"The tendency to allergy is a
dominant hereditary characteris-
tic which may be transmitted by
one or both of the parents to their
children according to Mendelian
law," he stated.
General Allergy
however, specific sensitivities to
particular substances are not car-
ried down from generation to gen-
eration. It is merely the tendency
to all allergy in general which is
inherited; the individual allergy
is determined by the environment,
he added.
Dr. Jimenez estimated that ap-
proximately 56 per cent of the
students entering the University
are sensitized or allergic. Those
who show such danger signals
such as frequent "colds," gastro-
intestinal upsets, hay fever and

asthma are advised to undergo
a series of cutaneous or scratch
tests to determine their allergy.
If the patient does not react to
these substances and the cause
of the sensitivity is not determ-
ined, intradermal tests are then
used.
Complete Relief
"In most cases," Dr. Jimenez
stated, "we are able to determine
and treat the cause of the sensi-
tivity before any pathology occurs.
Our patients usually get 100 per
cent relief."
However, Dr. Jimenez stressed
the fact that best results can be
obtained when the sensitivity has
not advanced into the later stages
where physical damage may oc-
cur.
In cases where engaged couples
find that one or both of them
are allergic and axe afraid of
transmitting the tendency to their
children Dr Jimenez advises that
"If you are in love, get iarried,
and let us worry about the child-
ren."

Enrollments
Remain High
In Psychology'
After a tremendous post-war
boom, psychology enrollments are
levelling off and the department
has settled down to conducting
several large scale research proj-
ects and to training twice the
number of psychology concen-
trates of pre-war years.
The greatest effect of the in-
flux of veterans on the depart-
ment has been the doubling of
staff members with ratings of in-
structor or higher, according to
Prof. Burton D. Thuma, of the
psychology department. Govern-
ment grants for large research ex-
periments have also caused much
reorganization within the depart-
ment.

LAMENT OF THE LAW:
Daredevilish Drivers, Pesky
Pedestrians, Plague Police

By HERBERT ARONSON
A recent impartial survey con-
ducted by an independent, na-
tionally-known testing laboratory
(consisting of one reporter)
showed that the much-abused
cops have a few complaints of
their own to register against the
public.
Arnong policemen who know
Ann Arbor traffic best the vote
was two to one in favor of traffic
violators as the chief source of
gray hair. Careless drivers who
act as though their prime objec-
tive is adding to the accident sta-
tistics were particularly de-
nounced by the law guardians.
Deadly Drivers
In fact, one of the cops report-
ed seeing a driver, 'after knock-
ing down a pedestrian, lean out of

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SOVIET STAR-One of the
foremost Russian actors, Boris
Chirkov, is shown as he appears
in "The Great Glinka," Soviet
film current on display at Lydia
Mendelssohn. The film is pre-
sented by the Art Cinema
I42ague.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 1021
Angell Hall, by 3:00 p.m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a.m. Sat-
urdays).
* *
Notices
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1948
VOL. LVIII, No. 101
Faculty Meeting, College of Lit-
erature Science, and the Arts:
Mon., March 1, 4:10 p.m., Rm.
1025, Angell Hall.
AGENDA
1. Consideration of the minutes
of the meeting of February 9, 1948
(pp. 1406-1408).
2. Resolutions for Professors W.
R. Humphreys and C. F. Love.
3. Consideration of reports sub-
mitted with the call to this meet-
ing.
a. Executive Committee-Prof.
C. D. Thorpe.
b. University Council - Asso.
Prof. F. K. Sparrow. No report.
c. Executive Board of the Grad-
uate School-Prof. I. L. Sharf-
man. No report.
d. Senate Advisory Committee
on University Affairs-Prof. H. M.
Dorr.
e. Deans' Conference - Dean
Hayward Keniston.
4. Interim report of the Com-
mittee on Examinations.
5. Special Order: Report of the
Curriculum Committee.
6. New business.
7. Announcements.
Preferential basketball tickets:
Distribution of tickets for Mon-
day's game with Iowa, 9 a.m.-5
p.m., University Hall booth. ID
cards or cashier's receipts must
be shown and. only two tickets will
be distributed to each student, re-
gardless of the nuniber of ID cards
in his possession.
Graduate Students expecting to
receive the master's or doctor's de-
gree in June must have their di-
ploma applications in the Gradu-
ate School Office no later than
Feb. 28.
Student Organizations wishing
to retain official recognition as
campus groups during the current
semester must submit a member-
ship report for the second semester

to the office of student affairs on
or before Feb. 28. Forms may be
secured in Rm. 2, University Hall
Groups which have not filed this
information will not be included
in the list of approved organiza-
tions.
Approved social events for the
coming week-end:
February 27
Congregational Disciples Guild,
Intercooperative Council, Jordan
Hall, Theta Xi, Zeta Beta Tau
February 28
Acacia, Alpha Chi Sigma, Alpha
Kappa Kappa, Alpha Kappa Psi,
Beta Theta Pi, Chi Psi, Delta Sig-
ma Delta, Delta Tau Delta, Delta
Upsilon, Michigan Christian Fel-
lowship, League Dormitory Girls,
Muriel Lester Cooperative, Phi
Kappa Psi, Phi Sigma Delta, Phi
Sigma Kappa. Sigma Chi, Sigma
Nu, Sigma Phi
February 29
Adelia Cheever (afternoon),
Michigan Cooperative (afternoon)
Freshmen who competed in the
Hopwood contests should call for
their manuscripts at the Hopwood
Room this week.
Senior and graduate member of
Alpha Lambda Delta who have
maintained that organization's
scholastic average throughout col-
lege are eligible to apply for a $750
fellowship offered by the National
Council. Qualified women who
are interested should send their
names to the Dean of Women be-
fore March 15 for consideration.
Summer Employment in For-
estry: All students in the School
of Forestry and Conservation who
desire summer employment in the
western regions of the U. S. For-
est Service must submit applica-1
tions immediately. Forms are
available in Rm. 2048, Natural
Science Bldg.
The Lucinda Goodrich Downs
NEW PORTAB.E
TYPEWRITERS
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AA
e How o o dogs affect the
py of baseball players?
O Who'N rab Jack Kramer's
ar:ateui- tannis crown?
*We o i she superman who
threates . . Olm pic
track aurcls?
a WVlat dos a "king-size"
do;wy have to Io with
h Iketc'IN sors?
Sti E° o i ": r ig 4" 11hreaten-
inJ h:or h tEhbyL ocke!
9 Who wicn the bitter bate

for our top college fcahcal!
star?
Brus] up on all th e answers.
Read Bill Fay's new, lively sports
feat ure exclusively in Collier's
every week. Keep ahead of the
headlines w'A ih the bl:"n iant
young make>r of sckOops. Iia/py

the window and mark an "X" on
th' side of his car.
Pedestrians also come in for
their share of criticism. The stu-
dent pedestrian's most serious of-
fense is walking between parked
cars onto the street, the police
say.
The "Old Look"
Another source of pedestrian
accidents is the student who does
not look about when crossing the
street. This tendency has been ob-
served to be particularly great
among the men when the female
of the species, wearing that "old
look," passes by.
The parking question is another
cause of the short life expectancy
of Ann Arbor's finest. So acute
has this problem become that
Captain Roland Gainsley, head of
the local Traffic Division, stated
in a recent interview that he has
no difficulty in sympathizing with
students who complain about their
parking troubles. "I have to park
nearly three blocks away from
Police Headquarters every day
myself," he confided.

scholarships have been awarded
to Barbara Jean Rattray DuBois,
and Florence Marie Lindamood.
The Children's School of the
Vassar College Summer Institute
is offering student assistantships
to undergraduates in Child Study,
Child Psychology or Home Eco-
nomics. Applications must be filed
by March 15. For further infor-
mation, call at the Bureau of Ap-
pointments.
The Committee on Student Af-
fairs will hold its next meeting on
Tues., March 2, 3 p.m. Petitions to
be presented for consideration at
this meeting must be submitted to
the Office of Student Affairs, Rm.
2, University Hall, not later than
12 noon on Mon., March 1.
Lectures
Thomas M. Cooley Lectures.
General topic: "Our Legal Sys-
tem and How It Operates. Fifth
Lecture: "Interpretation of Stand-
ards," by Burke Shartel, Professor
of Law' 4:15 p.m., Fri., Feb. 27,
Rm. 150, Hutchins Hall. The pub-
lic is invited.
Phi Sigma: Joint open meeting
with Sigma Xi, 8 p.m., Mon., Mar.
1, Rackham Amphitheatre. Dr.
Bradley M. Patten, Chairman of
the Department of Anatomy, will
speak on the topic "The First
Heart Beats and the Beginning of
the Circulation in Living Embryos
as Recorded by Micro-moving Pic-
tures."
French Lecture: Prof. Antoine
Jobin, of the Romance Language
Department, will offer a lecture
entitled "Pierre Le Moyne d'Iber-
ville-Le Cid de la Nouvelle France,"
March 2, 4:10 p.m., Rm. D, Alumni
Memorial Hall; auspices of Le
Cercle Francais.
(Continued on Page 5)

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